Special Issue "Functional Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Bioimaging"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Carolina Carrillo-Carrión

BioNanoTools lab at CIQUS, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: analytical chemistry; material science; nanoparticles’ synthesis and functionalization; sensing; imaging; delivery; cell-nanoparticle interactions
Guest Editor
Dr. Ester Polo

BioNanoTools lab at CIQUS, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biochemistry; molecular and cellular biology; nanomaterial synthesis; bionano-interface; bionanointerface

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rapid progress in the biosensing and bioimaging research fields have significantly benefited from the development of functional smart nanomaterials and their huge potential as signal transducers, enabling novel integrated solutions for diagnostics.

On the one hand, the unique properties of nanomaterials, such as optical, electrical, magnetic, and catalytical, and the fact that they are easily tunable by altering their compositions, sizes, shapes, and doping, providing interesting opportunities for improving the bioperformance of well-known biosensors and the development of sensing and imaging approaches based on different transduction techniques. On the other hand, the myriad of existing surface functionalization strategies allows modifying the surface chemistry of such nanomaterials with the aim of introducing recognition units for the detection of specific target compounds for sensing, and targeting moieties to label specific region of interest (e.g., cells and intracellular organelles) for imaging. Altogether, nanomaterials and surface chemistry strategies constitute a powerful and versatile toolbox to design functional nanomaterials with specific requirements depending on the desired application, that is, following a 'design-for-purpose' approach.

Analytical features, such as sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and reliability are the key points for improving the performance of these functional nanomaterials for both sensing and imaging purposes. This is challenging when working with complex samples as in the case of biological samples, where many potential interferences are present, and much more especially with cells and organisms. In addition, biocompatibility is a fundamental prerequisite that must be met by these nanomaterials for their use in in vivo applications. Despite all the recent advances, the application of functional nanomaterials in in vivo sensing and/or imaging is still in its infancy, and therefore, new nanomaterials with improved performance are required. Additionally, the combination of sensing and imaging capabilities in one single multifunctional nanomaterial that is able of monitoring and visualizing specific cellular and molecular events in vivo will pave the path towards more reliable diagnostic tools.

In this Special Issue, we seek unique research and development efforts to engineer novel platforms for precise disease diagnosis by designing multimodal functional materials for early detection, screening, and image-guided treatments. This Special Issue aims to promote exchange of ideas and knowledge among researchers in the fields of materials science, chemistry, biology and biomedicine.

Dr. Carolina Carrillo-Carrión
Dr. Ester Polo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticles
  • Surface functionalization
  • Biocompatibility
  • Biosensor
  • Imaging
  • Multimodal

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Applications of Nanomaterials for Immunosensing
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040104
Received: 25 September 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
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Abstract
In biomedical science among several other growing fields, the detection of specific biological agents or biomolecular markers, from biological samples is crucial for early diagnosis and decision-making in terms of appropriate treatment, influencing survival rates. In this regard, immunosensors are based on specific
[...] Read more.
In biomedical science among several other growing fields, the detection of specific biological agents or biomolecular markers, from biological samples is crucial for early diagnosis and decision-making in terms of appropriate treatment, influencing survival rates. In this regard, immunosensors are based on specific antibody-antigen interactions, forming a stable immune complex. The antigen-specific detection antibodies (i.e., biomolecular recognition element) are generally immobilized on the nanomaterial surfaces and their interaction with the biomolecular markers or antigens produces a physico-chemical response that modulates the signal readout. Lowering the detection limits for particular biomolecules is one of the key parameters when designing immunosensors. Thus, their design by combining the specificity and versatility of antibodies with the intrinsic properties of nanomaterials offers a plethora of opportunities for clinical diagnosis. In this review, we show a comprehensive set of recent developments in the field of nanoimmunosensors and how they are progressing the detection and validation for a wide range of different biomarkers in multiple diseases and what are some drawbacks and considerations of the uses of such devices and their expansion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Bioimaging)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Advanced Nanoscale Approaches to Single-(Bio)entity Sensing and Imaging
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040100
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
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Abstract
Individual (bio)chemical entities could show a very heterogeneous behaviour under the same conditions that could be relevant in many biological processes of significance in the life sciences. Conventional detection approaches are only able to detect the average response of an ensemble of entities
[...] Read more.
Individual (bio)chemical entities could show a very heterogeneous behaviour under the same conditions that could be relevant in many biological processes of significance in the life sciences. Conventional detection approaches are only able to detect the average response of an ensemble of entities and assume that all entities are identical. From this perspective, important information about the heterogeneities or rare (stochastic) events happening in individual entities would remain unseen. Some nanoscale tools present interesting physicochemical properties that enable the possibility to detect systems at the single-entity level, acquiring richer information than conventional methods. In this review, we introduce the foundations and the latest advances of several nanoscale approaches to sensing and imaging individual (bio)entities using nanoprobes, nanopores, nanoimpacts, nanoplasmonics and nanomachines. Several (bio)entities such as cells, proteins, nucleic acids, vesicles and viruses are specifically considered. These nanoscale approaches provide a wide and complete toolbox for the study of many biological systems at the single-entity level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Bioimaging)
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