Special Issue "Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Han-Sheng Chuang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University; Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
Interests: biomicrofluidics; MEMS/NEMS; optical diagnostics; biosensors; C. elegans

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is continually raging around the world, rapid and precise screening has become one effective measure to impede its fast spread. This urgent need for controlling the epidemic raises the necessity of developing more powerful biosensing technologies. As a result, this Special Issue aims to present the most advanced biosensing technologies which can be used for various biological entities. In that sense, a broad range of topics in this area, from integration methods to novel microfluidic-based sensors in medical applications, will be covered. Considering the pandemic has yet to show a sign of mitigation, I sincerely invite all experts who are working in the relevant fields to contribute your articles to this Special Issue on “Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications”. Your articles may inspire potential solutions to end the escalating pandemic. Most importantly, the dissemination of innovative knowledge through the academic platform can form a potent defense for humans and help to prepare well for the next devastating disease outbreak.

Prof. Dr. Han-Sheng Chuang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Microfluidic devices
  • Biochips
  • Diagnostics
  • Lab-on-chip
  • Bio-MEMS/Bio-NEMS
  • Point-of-care
  • Precision medicine
  • Sensitivity/specificity/accuracy
  • Rapid detection

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
2LTRZFP Interacts Specifically to HIV-1 DNA without Off-Target Effects as Determined by Biolayer Interferometry
Biosensors 2021, 11(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11030076 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 570
Abstract
Protein and DNA interactions are crucial for many cellular processes. Biolayer Interferometry (BLI) is a label-free technology for determining kinetic biomolecular interactions with high accuracy results. In the present study, we determined the kinetic binding of a zinc finger scaffold, 2LTRZFP, which formerly [...] Read more.
Protein and DNA interactions are crucial for many cellular processes. Biolayer Interferometry (BLI) is a label-free technology for determining kinetic biomolecular interactions with high accuracy results. In the present study, we determined the kinetic binding of a zinc finger scaffold, 2LTRZFP, which formerly constructed the interfering effect on HIV-1 integration process using BLI. The competitive Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to initially show the specific binding of 2LTRZFP. The percentages of inhibition were 62% and 22% in double-stranded 2LTR (ds2LTR) and irrelevant DNA (dsNeg), respectively. Consequently, the binding affinity of 2LTRZFP against ds2LTR target analyzed by BLI was 40 nM, which is stronger than the interaction of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme to the 2LTR circle junction. Additionally, the 2LTRZFP did not interact with the genomic DNA extracted from SupT1 cell line. This result indicates that 2LTRZFP did not exhibit off-target effects against human genome. The knowledge obtained from this study supports the prospect of using 2LTRZFP in HIV-1 gene therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications)
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Article
Developing Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing for Motile/Non-Motile Bacteria Treated with Antibiotics Covering Five Bactericidal Mechanisms on the Basis of Bead-Based Optical Diffusometry
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110181 - 19 Nov 2020
Viewed by 668
Abstract
Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is an effective measure in the treatment of infections and the prevention of bacterial drug resistance. However, diverse antibiotic types and bacterial characteristics have formed complicated barriers to rapid diagnosis. To counteract these limitations, we investigated the interactions [...] Read more.
Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is an effective measure in the treatment of infections and the prevention of bacterial drug resistance. However, diverse antibiotic types and bacterial characteristics have formed complicated barriers to rapid diagnosis. To counteract these limitations, we investigated the interactions between antibiotic-treated bacteria and functionalized microbeads in optical diffusometry. The conjugation with bacteria increased the effective microbead complex size, thereby resulting in a temporal diffusivity change. The yielded data were sorted and analyzed to delineate a pattern for the prediction of antimicrobial susceptibility. The outcome showed that a completed rapid AST based on the trend of microbead diffusivity could provide results within 3 h (2 h measurement + 1 h computation). In this research, we studied four bacterial strains, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus, and six antibiotics. Despite the different inhibitory effects caused by various antibiotics, similar trends in diffusivity alteration for all susceptible and resistant cases in the last 40 min of the 2-h measurement period were deduced. In addition, the AST results obtained using optical diffusometry showed good agreement with those acquired from the commercial instrument and conventional culture methods. Finally, we conducted a single-blinded clinical test, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the system reached 92.9%, 91.4%, and 91.8%, respectively. Overall, the developed optical diffusometry showcased rapid AST with a small sample volume (20 μL) and low initial bacterial count (105 CFU/mL). This technique provided a promising way to achieve early therapy against microbial diseases in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications)
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Article
Colorimetric Diagnostic Capillary Enabled by Size Sieving in a Porous Hydrogel
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10100130 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1017
Abstract
Handy and disposable point-of-care diagnostics facilitate the early screening of severe diseases in resource-limited areas. To address urgent needs in inconvenient sites, a simple colorimetric diagnostic device equipped with a capillary tube with porous hydrogel and immunocomplex particles was developed for the rapid [...] Read more.
Handy and disposable point-of-care diagnostics facilitate the early screening of severe diseases in resource-limited areas. To address urgent needs in inconvenient sites, a simple colorimetric diagnostic device equipped with a capillary tube with porous hydrogel and immunocomplex particles was developed for the rapid detection of biomarkers (16 min). In this device, probe particles attach to capture particles (dp = 40 µm) and form sandwiched immunocomplexes in the presence of target biomarkers, and a red color progressively emerges when the sandwiched immunocomplex particles are blocked by the porous hydrogel embedded inside the glass capillary. Colorimetric aggregation was recorded using a smartphone and analyzed with imaging software. The limit of detection reached 1 ng/mL and showed a maximum of 79% accuracy compared with that obtained through a conventional spectrophotometric technique. The level of a diabetic retinopathy (DR) biomarker, lipocalin-1 (LCN-1), was measured in 1 µL of a human tear sample and used in testing the practicability of the proposed device. All healthy subjects showed lower intensity levels than the other diabetic counterparts (proliferative DR or nonproliferative DR patients), implying the potential of this device in clinical applications. Overall, the diagnostic device facilitates point-of-care-testing and provides a low-cost (~1 USD), compact, and reliable tool for early diagnosis in resource-limited areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications)
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Article
CO2 Laser Photoacoustic Spectrometer for Measuring Acetone in the Breath of Lung Cancer Patients
Biosensors 2020, 10(6), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10060055 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1943
Abstract
A CO2 laser has the advantages of being high in power and having many laser lines in the 9–11 µm infrared region. Thus, a CO2 laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) can have a multi-component measurement capability for many gas compounds that have [...] Read more.
A CO2 laser has the advantages of being high in power and having many laser lines in the 9–11 µm infrared region. Thus, a CO2 laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) can have a multi-component measurement capability for many gas compounds that have non-zero absorption coefficients at the laser lines, and therefore can be applied for measuring several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the human breath. We have developed a CO2 laser PAS system for detecting acetone in the human breath. Although acetone has small absorption coefficients at the CO2 laser lines, our PAS system was able to obtain strong photoacoustic (PA) signals at several CO2 laser lines, with the strongest one being at the 10P20 line. Since at the 10P20 line, ethylene and ammonia also have significant absorption coefficients, these two gases have to be included in a multi-component measurement with acetone. We obtained the lowest detection limit of our system for the ethylene, acetone, and ammonia are 6 ppbv, 11 ppbv, and 31 ppbv, respectively. We applied our PAS system to measure these three VOCs in the breath of three groups of subjects, i.e., patients with lung cancer disease, patients with other lung diseases, and healthy volunteers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications)
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Review

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Review
Biomolecules and Electrochemical Tools in Chronic Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance: A Systematic Review
Biosensors 2020, 10(9), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10090121 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1178
Abstract
Over recent three decades, the electrochemical techniques have become widely used in biological identification and detection, because it presents optimum features for efficient and sensitive molecular detection of organic compounds, being able to trace quantities with a minimum of reagents and sample manipulation. [...] Read more.
Over recent three decades, the electrochemical techniques have become widely used in biological identification and detection, because it presents optimum features for efficient and sensitive molecular detection of organic compounds, being able to trace quantities with a minimum of reagents and sample manipulation. Given these special features, electrochemical techniques are regularly exploited in disease diagnosis and monitoring. Specifically, amperometric electrochemical analysis has proven to be quite suitable for the detection of physiological biomarkers in monitoring health conditions, as well as toward the control of reactive oxygen species released in the course of oxidative burst during inflammatory events. Besides, electrochemical detection techniques involve a simple and swift assessment that provides a low detection-limit for most of the molecules enclosed biological fluids and related to non-transmittable morbidities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biosensing Technologies in Medical Applications)
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