Special Issue "Wine Aging Technologies"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. María del Alamo-Sanza

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ignacio Nevares

Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wine aging is a desirable and valuable process, commonly used to improve wine quality, and traditionally carried out in oak wooden casks. The correct use of oak barrels and the ever-increasing demand for barrels in the different production areas of the world has led to a constant search for technological alternatives to reproduce the chemical and physical processes undergone by wines during their stay in barrels.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish a compilation of original research and revision works that cover different aspects of the ageing processes of wine in casks and other alternative systems that reproduce, with different technologies, the transformations that take place in the barrel.

Important aspects to be addressed are:

  • the type of technological solutions that exist for wine aging
  • the impact of these new technologies on the final product
  • comparison of the effect of emerging and traditional technologies on the wine aged
  • differentiation of wines undergoing different systems to avoid fraud
  • characterization of the new materials used in barrel production
  • accelerated aging of wines with wood and oxygen

Original and review papers dealing with all aspects of wine aging or aging technologies are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Beverages.

Prof. Dr. María del Alamo-Sanza
Prof. Dr. Ignacio Nevares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Oxygen Consumption by Red Wines under Different Micro-Oxygenation Strategies and Q. Pyrenaica Chips. Effects on Color and Phenolic Characteristics
Received: 9 August 2018 / Revised: 31 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
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Abstract
The use of alternative oak products (AOP) for wine aging is a common practice in which micro-oxygenation (MOX) is a key factor to obtain a final wine that is more stable over time and with similar characteristics as barrel-aged wines. Therefore, the oxygen
[...] Read more.
The use of alternative oak products (AOP) for wine aging is a common practice in which micro-oxygenation (MOX) is a key factor to obtain a final wine that is more stable over time and with similar characteristics as barrel-aged wines. Therefore, the oxygen dosage added must be that which the wine is able to consume to develop correctly. Oxygen consumption by red wine determines its properties, so it is essential that micro-oxygenation be managed properly. This paper shows the results from the study of the influence on red wine of two different MOX strategies: floating oxygen dosage (with dissolved oxygen setpoint of 50 µg/L) and fixed oxygen dosage (3 mL/L·month). The results indicated that the wines consumed all the oxygen provided: those from fixed MOX received between 3 and 3.5 times more oxygen than the floating MOX strategy, the oxygen contribution from the air entrapped in the wood being more significant in the latter. Wines aged with wood and MOX showed the same color and phenolic evolution as those aged in barrels, demonstrating the importance of MOX management. Despite the differences in the oxygen consumed, it was not possible to differentiate wines from the different MOX strategies at the end of the aging period in contact with wood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Aging Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Novel Method for the Identification of the Variety of Grape Using Their Capability to Form Gold Nanoparticles
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 19 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
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Abstract
Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been obtained using musts (freshly prepared grape juices where solid peels and seeds have been removed) as the reducing and capping agent. Transmission Electron Microscope images show that the formed AuNPs are spherical and their size increases with the
[...] Read more.
Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been obtained using musts (freshly prepared grape juices where solid peels and seeds have been removed) as the reducing and capping agent. Transmission Electron Microscope images show that the formed AuNPs are spherical and their size increases with the amount of must used. The size of the AuNPs increases with the Total Polyphenol Index (TPI) of the variety of grape. The kinetics of the reaction monitored using UV-Vis shows that the reaction rates are related to the chemical composition of the musts and specifically to the phenols that can act as reducing and capping agents during the synthesis process. Since the particular composition of each must produces AuNPs of different sizes and at different rates, color changes can be used to discriminate the variety of grape. This new technology can be used to avoid fraud. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Aging Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Fining Agents, Reverse Osmosis and Wine Age on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) Taint in Wine
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
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Abstract
Trans-2-decenal and tridecane are compounds found in wine made from brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)-contaminated grapes. The effectiveness of post-fermentation processes on reducing their concentration in finished wine and their longevity during wine aging was evaluated. Red wines containing trans-2-decenal were
[...] Read more.
Trans-2-decenal and tridecane are compounds found in wine made from brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)-contaminated grapes. The effectiveness of post-fermentation processes on reducing their concentration in finished wine and their longevity during wine aging was evaluated. Red wines containing trans-2-decenal were treated with fining agents and put through reverse osmosis filtration. The efficacy of these treatments was determined using chemical analysis (MDGC-MS) and sensory descriptive analysis. Tridecane and trans-2-decenal concentrations in red and white wine were determined at bottle aging durations of 0, 6, 12 and 24 months using MDGC-MS. Reverse osmosis was found to be partially successful in removing trans-2-decenal concentration from finished wine. While tridecane and trans-2-decenal concentrations decreased during bottle aging, post-fermentative fining treatments were not effective at removing these compounds. Although French oak did not alter the concentration of tridecane and trans-2-decenal in red wine, it did mask the expression of BMSB-related sensory characters. Because of the ineffectiveness of removing BMSB taint post-fermentation, BMSB densities in the grape clusters should be minimized so that the taint does not occur in the wine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Aging Technologies)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Innovations in Wine Aging: Simulating Oak Aging Flavor with an Oak Bottle
Authors: Encarna Gómez-Plaza, Oscar Ballesta, Ana Belen Bautista-Ortín
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Abstract: The organoleptic improvement of wines achieved by aging in oak barrels has been widely studied. One of the most important improvements in this respect concerns wine aroma, the complexity of which increases due to the extraction of certain compounds present in the wood. These are transferred to wine during the aging period, although several months are necessary to attain a good level of these aroma compounds, especially if the barrels used are old. On the negative side, barrels are expensive, take up a lot of space in a winery, and their lifetime is limited. Alternatives have been developed to simplify the aging process while ensuring that the wood-originated volatiles are released into the wine. One of these techniques consists of adding small pieces of oak, commonly known as oak chips, to the wine, which is kept in stainless steel tanks.
Here, we present an new innovation: an oak bottle capable of enriching wine with oak volatile compounds in just a few hours. Our study was designed to study the extraction and accumulation of oak-derived volatile compounds in wines stored in this bottle and to compare the results with those of wines aged with oak chips or barrels.

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