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Special Issue "Alcoholic Beverages Aging Technologies"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Fragrances and Flavours".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ignacio Nevares
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
Interests: oxygen; micro-oxygenation; woods for enology; oak barrel; permeability; solubility; automatization; wine aging; oak chips
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. María Del Alamo-Sanza
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
Interests: wine aging; oxygen; oak barrel; oak chips; micro-oxygenation; bottle; woods for enology; analytical chemistry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Barrel aging is a desirable and valuable process, commonly used to improve wine and other alcoholic beverages’ quality, and traditionally carried out in oak wooden casks. The correct use of oak barrels and the ever-increasing demand for barrels in the different production areas of the world has led to a constant search for technological alternatives to reproduce the chemical and physical processes undergone by alcoholic beverages during their stay in barrels.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish a compilation of original research and revision works that cover different aspects of the aging processes of wine, beer, spirits, and other alcoholic beverages in casks and other alternative systems that reproduce, with different technologies, the transformations that take place in the barrel.

Important aspects to be addressed are:

  • The type of technological solutions that exist for barrel aging;
  • The impact of these new technologies on the final product;
  • Comparison of the effect of emerging and traditional technologies on the chemical and sensorial characteristics in aged alcoholic beverages;
  • Differentiation of beverages undergoing different aging systems to avoid fraud
  • characterization of the new materials used in cooperage and in the alternative systems to barrel;
  • Accelerated aging of beverages with wood and oxygen;
  • New woods in cooperage;
  • Reductive aging in bottle and alternative containers (BiB, etc.);
  • Influence of cooperage technologies in the aging process.

Original and review papers dealing with all aspects of alcoholic beverage aging or aging technologies are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Molecules.

Prof. Dr. Ignacio Nevares
Prof. Dr. Maria del Alamo Sanza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wine aging
  • Barrel
  • Alcoholic beverages
  • Micro-oxygenation
  • Alternatives
  • Oxygen
  • Maturation
  • Bottle aging

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Artificial Intelligence Methods for Constructing Wine Barrels with a Controlled Oxygen Transmission Rate
Molecules 2020, 25(14), 3312; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25143312 - 21 Jul 2020
Abstract
Oxygen is an important factor in the wine aging process, and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) is the parameter of the wood that reflects its oxygen permeation. OTR has not been considered in the cooperage industry yet; however, recent studies proposed a nondestructive [...] Read more.
Oxygen is an important factor in the wine aging process, and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) is the parameter of the wood that reflects its oxygen permeation. OTR has not been considered in the cooperage industry yet; however, recent studies proposed a nondestructive method for estimating the OTR of barrel staves, but an efficient method to combine these staves to build barrels with a desired OTR is needed to implement it in the industry. This article proposes artificial intelligence methods for selecting staves for the construction of barrel heads or bodies with a desired target OTR. Genetic algorithms were used to implement these methods in consideration of the known OTR of the staves and the geometry of the wine barrels. The proposed methods were evaluated in several scenarios: homogenizing the OTR of the actual constructed barrels, constructing low-OTR and high-OTR barrels based on a preclassification of the staves and implementing the proposed method in real cooperage conditions. The results of these experiments suggest the suitability of the proposed methods for their implementation in a cooperage in order to build controlled OTR barrels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Aging Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Use of Oak and Cherry Wood Chips during Alcoholic Fermentation and the Maturation Process of Rosé Wines: Impact on Phenolic Composition and Sensory Profile
Molecules 2020, 25(5), 1236; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25051236 - 09 Mar 2020
Abstract
There is a lack of knowledge about the use of different wood species on rosé wine production. Thus, this work focused on the impact of the addition of wood chips from oak and cherry trees during the alcoholic fermentation and maturation process on [...] Read more.
There is a lack of knowledge about the use of different wood species on rosé wine production. Thus, this work focused on the impact of the addition of wood chips from oak and cherry trees during the alcoholic fermentation and maturation process on rosé wine characteristics. Therefore, phenolic composition and sensory characteristics were monitored during the rosé wines’ production. The use of wood chips during alcoholic fermentation induced a significant increase of phenolic content in rosé musts. During rosé wine maturation, the wood chip contact induced significantly higher values of colored anthocyanins, color intensity, and polymeric pigments, and significantly lower values of color hue in the corresponding rosé wines. In terms of sensory profile, a tendency for lower scores of “overall appreciation” were attributed to control rosé wine, while significantly higher scores for “color intensity” descriptor were attributed to all rosé wines matured in contact with wood chips. For the majority of phenolic parameters and individual phenolic compounds quantified, a clear and specific influence of the use of oak and cherry wood chips was not detected, except for (+)-catechin, where the rosé wines produced in contact with cherry chips showed the highest values. This study provides relevant information for winemakers about the impact of the use of wood chips on rosé wine quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Aging Technologies)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Alternative Woods in Enology: Characterization of Tannin and Low Molecular Weight Phenol Compounds with Respect to Traditional Oak Woods. A Review
Molecules 2020, 25(6), 1474; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25061474 - 24 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Wood is one of the most highly valued materials in enology since the chemical composition and sensorial properties of wine change significantly when in contact with it. The need for wood in cooperage and the concern of enologists in their search for new [...] Read more.
Wood is one of the most highly valued materials in enology since the chemical composition and sensorial properties of wine change significantly when in contact with it. The need for wood in cooperage and the concern of enologists in their search for new materials to endow their wines with a special personality has generated interest in the use of other Quercus genus materials different from the traditional ones (Q. petraea, Q. robur and Q. alba) and even other wood genera. Thereby, species from same genera such as Q. pyrenaica Willd., Q. faginea Lam., Q. humboldtti Bonpl., Q. oocarpa Liebm., Q. stellata Wangenh, Q. frainetto Ten., Q. lyrata Walt., Q. bicolor Willd. and other genera such as Castanea sativa Mill. (chestnut), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (false acacia), Prunus avium L. and P. cereaus L. (cherry), Fraxinus excelsior L. (European ash) and F. americana L. (American ash) have been studied with the aim of discovering whether they could be a new reservoir of wood for cooperage. This review aims to summarize the characterization of tannin and low molecular weight phenol compositions of these alternative woods for enology in their different cooperage stages and compare them to traditional oak woods, as both are essential to proposing their use in cooperage for aging wine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Aging Technologies)
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