Special Issue "Mind–Body Interventions for Psychological and Cognitive Benefits"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Albert S. Yeung

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mind-body interventions (Tai Chi, Qigong, and Yoga); mental health; cognitive behavioral therapy; mindfulness; relaxation technique
Guest Editor
Dr. Liye Zou

Department of Sports Science & Physical Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mind-body exercises from neurophysiological mechanism to psychosomatic health; early intervention for motor, cognitive, and social development; evidence-based research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, mind–body interventions (MBI) have received substantial attention from scholars worldwide. MBIs emphasize the interaction between mind, body, and behavior, and examples include, but are not limited to, Yoga, Tai Chi, Qigong, Pilates, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, breathing technique, relaxation, and stress management and resiliency training (SMART).

The emerging evidence indicates that mind–body interventions have beneficial effects on somatic-psychological outcomes and cognitive function among both healthy people (e.g., pregnant women, highly stressed workers, mental health professionals) and patients with medical and psychiatric conditions (e.g., musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, cognitive impairment, depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, insomnia). To provide better recommendations to health professionals for disease prevention and symptomatic managements, more evidence-based research needs to be conducted to substantiate the health benefits of MBIs on psychological outcomes and cognitive function.

Thus, we have the privilege of inviting you to submit your unpublished work in the form of a systematic review of existing literature, meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, or research articles with sound scientific methods and innovative statistical analyses.

Dr. Albert Yeung
Dr. Liye Zou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mindful practice
  • mindfulness
  • mind–body movement/exercise
  • Tai Chi, Yoga, Qigong
  • meditative movement
  • breathing exercise
  • meditation
  • relaxation technique
  • psychological outcomes
  • cognitive function
  • memory
  • cognitive flexibility
  • cognitive control
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • mental health
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • stress

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Meditation-Induced States, Vagal Tone, and Breathing Activity Are Related to Changes in Auditory Temporal Integration
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9050051
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 4 May 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1361 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study is based on the relationship between meditation, the present moment, and psychophysiology. We employed the metronome task to operationalize the extension of the present moment. A pre-post longitudinal study was conducted. The performance in the metronome task was compared before and [...] Read more.
This study is based on the relationship between meditation, the present moment, and psychophysiology. We employed the metronome task to operationalize the extension of the present moment. A pre-post longitudinal study was conducted. The performance in the metronome task was compared before and after the interventions (meditation, story). The aim was to assess whether physiological changes (heart, breathing) during meditation influence the temporal-integration (TI) of metronome beats. Mindfulness meditators either meditated (n = 41) or listened to a story (n = 43). The heart and breathing activity were recorded during the intervention and compared to a resting-state condition. By applying path analyses we found that meditation led to an increase of the duration of integration intervals at the slowest metronome frequency (inter-stimulus interval, ISI = 3 s). After meditation, the higher the heart-rate variability (i.e., the root mean square of successive differences, RMSSD), the longer the duration of integration intervals at the fastest frequency (ISI = 0.33 s). Moreover, the higher the breathing rate during meditation, the greater the integration of intervals at ISI = 1 s. These findings add evidence to meditation-induced changes on the TI of metronome beats and the concept of the embodiment of mental functioning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mind–Body Interventions for Psychological and Cognitive Benefits)
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Open AccessArticle
Less Binge Eating and Loss of Control over Eating Are Associated with Greater Levels of Mindfulness: Identifying Patterns in Postmenopausal Women with Obesity
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9040036
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
PDF Full-text (272 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is a public health concern resulting in widespread personal, social, and economic burden. Many individuals with obesity report feeling unable to stop eating or to control their food intake (i.e., a loss of control over eating) despite their best efforts. Experiencing [...] Read more.
Obesity is a public health concern resulting in widespread personal, social, and economic burden. Many individuals with obesity report feeling unable to stop eating or to control their food intake (i.e., a loss of control over eating) despite their best efforts. Experiencing loss of control over eating predicts further eating pathology and is a key feature of binge eating. Mindfulness (i.e., awareness and acceptance of current thoughts, feelings, sensations, and surrounding events) has emerged as a potential strategy to treat such eating disorder behaviors, but it is not known whether there is merit in investigating this strategy to address binge eating in postmenopausal women with obesity. Thus, this study aimed to examine the relationships between binge eating and mindfulness in postmenopausal women with obesity seeking weight loss treatment. Participants (n = 101) were assessed with the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, the Loss of Control over Eating Scale, the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, and the Langer Mindfulness Scale. Participants´ overall scores on both mindfulness scales were significantly and negatively correlated with binge eating frequency or the severity of loss of control over eating. Moreover, participants who reported fewer binge eating episodes were significantly more mindful than those who reported greater frequencies of binge eating episodes within the past 28 days. These findings suggest a merit in investigating the use of mindfulness-based therapies to treat binge eating in postmenopausal women with obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mind–Body Interventions for Psychological and Cognitive Benefits)
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