Special Issue "Storm Surge Modeling – Capturing the Wind"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land - Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Stephen C. Medeiros

Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: storm surge; remote sensing; lidar; machine learning; UAS; autonomous systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustained, high-velocity winds induced by tropical cyclones grip the surface of our oceans and push water towards our valuable and vulnerable coastlines. The ability of scientists and engineers to accurately simulate storm surge in a variety of natural and built environments is essential to the assessment of risk and the design of resilient coastal infrastructure. This Special Issue of Atmosphere is focused on disseminating basic and applied research findings on the connection between wind and storm surge. Under the stated emphasis on the measurement, encoding, and implementation of tropical cyclone winds in storm surge models, we specifically encourage submissions involving the following topics:

  • Boundary layer interactions including momentum transfer, wind drag, and aerodynamic roughness characterization;
  • Quantification of the uncertainty associated with air/sea interaction;
  • Computational methods for wind-driven surge simulation including advances to high performance distributed computing architecture, data assimilation, and machine learning;
  • Parameterization and validation techniques based on in-situ sensor measurements, remote sensing, photogrammetry, etc.;
  • Innovative metrics to assess model performance.

Dr. Stephen C. Medeiros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • storm surge
  • tropical cyclones
  • wind
  • surface roughness
  • coastal risk
  • boundary layer processes
  • sensors
  • remote sensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Potential Highest Storm Tide Hazard in Taiwan Based on 40-Year Historical Typhoon Surge Hindcasting
Atmosphere 2019, 10(6), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10060346
Received: 29 May 2019 / Revised: 18 June 2019 / Accepted: 22 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
PDF Full-text (7803 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Typhoon-induced storm surges are catastrophic disasters in coastal areas worldwide, although typhoon surges are not extremely high in Taiwan. However, the rising water level around an estuary could be a block that obstructs the flow of water away from the estuary and indirectly [...] Read more.
Typhoon-induced storm surges are catastrophic disasters in coastal areas worldwide, although typhoon surges are not extremely high in Taiwan. However, the rising water level around an estuary could be a block that obstructs the flow of water away from the estuary and indirectly forms an overflow in the middle or lower reaches of a river if the occurrence of the highest storm surge (HSS) coincides with the highest astronomical tide (HAT). Therefore, assessing the highest storm tide (HST, a combination of the HSS and HAT) hazard level along the coast of Taiwan is particularly important to an early warning of riverine inundation. This study hindcasted the storm surges of 122 historical typhoon events from 1979 to 2018 using a high-resolution, unstructured-grid, surge-wave fully coupled model and a hybrid typhoon wind model. The long-term recording measurements at 28 tide-measuring stations around Taiwan were used to analyze the HAT characteristics. The hindcasted HSSs of each typhoon category (the Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan classified typhoon events into nine categories according to the typhoon’s track) were extracted and superposed on the HATs to produce the individual potential HST hazard maps. Each map was classified into six hazard levels (I to VI). Finally, a comprehensive potential HST hazard map was created based on the superposition of the HSSs from 122 typhoon events and HATs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storm Surge Modeling – Capturing the Wind)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of the Surface Wind Field Representation in the Operational Storm Surge Model of the National Hurricane Center
Atmosphere 2019, 10(4), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10040193
Received: 17 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
PDF Full-text (4320 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model is the operational storm surge model of the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Previous studies have found that the SLOSH model estimates storm surges with an accuracy of ±20%. In this study, through hindcasts [...] Read more.
The Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model is the operational storm surge model of the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Previous studies have found that the SLOSH model estimates storm surges with an accuracy of ±20%. In this study, through hindcasts of historical storms, we assess the accuracy of the SLOSH model for four coastal regions in the Northeastern United States. We investigate the potential to improve this accuracy through modification of the wind field representation. We modify the surface background wind field, the parametric wind profile, and the maximum wind speed based on empirical, physical, and observational data. We find that on average the SLOSH model underestimates maximum storm surge heights by 22%. The modifications to the surface background wind field and the parametric wind profile have minor impacts; however, the effect of the modification to maximum wind speed is significant—it increases the variance in the SLOSH model estimates of maximum storm surges, but improves its accuracy overall. We recommend that observed values of maximum wind speed be used in SLOSH model simulations when possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storm Surge Modeling – Capturing the Wind)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of the paper: Article
Tentative title: Assessment of Typhoon Surge Hazard Along the Coast of Taiwan Based on 40-year Model Hindcasts
Authors: Wei-Bo Chen; Chih-Hsin Chang; Hung-Ju Shih; Lee-Yaw Lin
Affiliations: National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction
Abstract:
Typhoon-induced storm surge is a catastrophic disaster in the coastal area worldwide, although typhoon surge is not extremely high in Taiwan. However, rising water level around estuary is a block that obstruct water volume flow away, and indirectly forming an overflow in middle or lower reaches of a river. Therefore, assessing storm surge hazard level along the coastal of Taiwan is particularly important to early warning for riverine inundation. This study hindcasted the storm surge of 126 historical typhoon events from 1978 to 2018 using a high-resolution, unstructured-grid, surge-wave fully coupled model and a fifth-generation atmospheric reanalysis typhoon wind fields (ERA5) from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECWMF). The maximum surges of each typhoon category (the Central Weather Bureau CWB of Taiwan classifies typhoon events into nine categories) were extracted to create individual storm surge hazard maps. Each map was classified into five hazard levels (I to V) corresponding to less than 5, exceeding 5, 20, 50 and 100 years return periods of the storm surge. A comprehensive storm surge hazard map was created based on the maximum surges from 126 typhoon events.
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