Special Issue "Analysis of Oceanic and Terrestrial Atmospheric Moisture Sources"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land - Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Vicente Pérez Muñuzuri

Group of Nonlinear Physics, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nonlinear physics; geophysical fluid dynamics; Lagrangian transport; meteorological and oceanographical modelling
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Raquel Nieto

EPhysLab (Environmental Physics Laboratory), Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, Ourense, Spain
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Phone: +34-988-387248
Interests: sources of moisture; Lagrangian models; atmospheric transport; climate diagnoses; synoptic meteorology; modes of variability
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francina Dominguez

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
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Interests: precipitation and hydrometeorological processes; climate modeling and climate change analysis; climate processes and interactions
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gonzalo Miguez Macho

Group of Nonlinear Physics, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: precipitation and hydrometeorological processes; climate modeling; climate processes and interactions
Guest Editor
Dr. Jorge Eiras-Barca

EPhysLab (Environmental Physics Laboratory), Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, Ourense, Spain or Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sources and sinks of moisture; atmospheric transport; synoptic meteorology; Lagrangian and Eulerian models; atmospheric rivers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent improvements in the analysis of precipitation trends and moisture advection processes have been revealing the growing importance of proper identification of the origin of the moisture associated with major hydrometeorological systems. This appropriate identification of the moisture sources involved in the primary atmospheric mechanisms resulting in precipitation events will help to better understand and conveniently predict their future evolution.

This Special Issue entitled “Analysis of Oceanic and Terrestrial Atmospheric Moisture Sources” aims to encompass novel manuscripts related to moisture sources which may be analyzed together with the associated sinks and transport processes. Works related to atmospheric rivers, low-level jets, extreme precipitation, hydrological cycle, moisture tracers, and Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis of the moisture spatial evolution are very welcome, along with any other related work that could help the current state of the art of hydroclimatology processes.

Best Regards,
Prof. Dr. Vicente Pérez-Muñuzuri
Prof. Dr. Raquel Nieto
Prof. Dr. Francina Dominguez
Prof. Dr. Gonzalo Miguez-Macho
Dr. Jorge Eiras-Barca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • moisture sources
  • Lagrangian methods
  • Eulerian tracers
  • moisture transport
  • evaporation and precipitation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Different Roles of Water Vapor Transport and Cold Advection in the Intensive Snowfall Events over North China and the Yangtze River Valley
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070368
Received: 10 June 2019 / Revised: 25 June 2019 / Accepted: 28 June 2019 / Published: 2 July 2019
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Abstract
Intensive snowfall events (ISEs) have a profound impact on the society and economy in China during winter. Considering that the interaction between northerly cold advection and southerly water vapor transport (WVT) is generally an essential condition for the occurrence of ISEs in eastern [...] Read more.
Intensive snowfall events (ISEs) have a profound impact on the society and economy in China during winter. Considering that the interaction between northerly cold advection and southerly water vapor transport (WVT) is generally an essential condition for the occurrence of ISEs in eastern China, this study investigates the different roles of anomalous southerly WVT and northerly cold advection during the ISEs in the North China (NC) and Yangtze River valley (YRV) regions based on a composite analysis of seventy ISE cases in NC and forty ISE cases in the YRV region from 1961 to 2014. The results indicate that the ISEs in NC are mainly associated with a significant pre-conditioning of water vapor over NC induced by southerly WVT anomalies over eastern China, whereas the ISEs in the YRV region are mainly associated with a strengthened Siberian High (SH) and strong northerly cold advection invading the YRV region. These results suggest a dominant role of anomalous southerly WVT in triggering the ISEs in NC and a dominant role of northerly cold advection in triggering the ISEs in the YRV region. The different roles of anomalous southerly WVT and northerly cold advection in the ISEs over the NC and YRV regions are largely attributed to the different winter climate in the NC and YRV regions—during winter, the NC (YRV) region is dominated by cold and dry (relatively warm and moist) air flow and hence southerly WVT (northerly cold advection) is the key factor for triggering the ISEs in NC (the YRV region). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Oceanic and Terrestrial Atmospheric Moisture Sources)
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Open AccessArticle
The Moisture Sources and Transport Processes for a Sudden Rainstorm Associated with Double Low-Level Jets in the Northeast Sichuan Basin of China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(3), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10030160
Received: 14 February 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 17 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
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Abstract
A sudden rainstorm that occurred in the northeast Sichuan Basin of China in early May 2017 was associated with a southwest low-level jet (SWLJ) and a mountainous low-level jet (MLLJ). This study investigates the impact of the double low-level jets (LLJs) on rainfall [...] Read more.
A sudden rainstorm that occurred in the northeast Sichuan Basin of China in early May 2017 was associated with a southwest low-level jet (SWLJ) and a mountainous low-level jet (MLLJ). This study investigates the impact of the double low-level jets (LLJs) on rainfall diurnal variation by using the data from ERA5 reanalysis, and explores the characteristics of water vapor transport, including the main paths and sources of moisture, by using the HYSPLIT-driven data of the ERA—interim, GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System), and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. The analysis shows that the sudden rainstorm in the mountain terrain was located at the left side of the large-scale SWLJ at 700 hPa, and at the exit region of the meso-scale MLLJ at 850 hPa. The double LLJs provide favorable moisture conditions, and the enhancement (weakening) of the LLJs is ahead of the start (end) of the rainstorm. The capacity of the LLJ at 850 hPa with respect to moisture convergence is superior to that at 700 hPa, especially when the MLLJ and the southerly LLJ at 850 hPa appear at the same time. The HYSPLIT backward trajectory model based on Lagrangian methods has favorable applicability in the event of sudden rainstorms in mountainous terrain, and there is no special path of moisture transport in this precipitation event. The main moisture sources of this process are the East China Sea–South China Sea, the Arabian Sea–Indian Peninsula, the Bay of Bengal, and the Middle East, accounting for 38%, 34%, 17% and 11% of the total moisture transport, respectively. Among them, the moisture transport in the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea–East China Sea is mainly located in the lower troposphere, which is below 900 hPa, while the moisture transport in the Arabian Sea–Indian Peninsula and the Middle East is mainly in the middle and upper layers of the troposphere. The moisture changes of the transport trajectories are affected by the topography, especially the high mountains around the Sichuan Basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Oceanic and Terrestrial Atmospheric Moisture Sources)
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