Organic Chemical Emissions: Sources, Measurements and Characteristics

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmospheric Techniques, Instruments, and Modeling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2022) | Viewed by 6487

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Occupational Safety and Hygiene, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung City 83102, Taiwan
Interests: solid-phase microextraction sampling and analysis; VOCs and odor treatment; control of VOC emissions; management of occupational health; VOCs analysis; atmospheric pollution monitoring and sampling using drones

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Guest Editor
Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan
Interests: advanced oxidation technologies; photothermocatalytic oxidation and reduction; air pollutants sampling and analysis; marine aerosols; atmospheric speciated mercury
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic chemical compounds emitted from anthropogenic sources, including stationary, mobile and fugitive sources, as well as natural emission sources, are potentially hazardous for the atmospheric environment and human health. Because the emission sources are complex, the concentrations of pollutants can easily change with time and transportation distance, and because organic compounds further react with the components in the atmosphere, the measurement of ambient organic chemical emission compounds is an essential issue worthy of further study.

This Special Issue provides a technology exchange platform and aims to cover the most recent progress and advancements in the field of novel techniques for the sampling, monitoring, and measurement of organic chemical emissions from different anthropogenic and natural sources. We especially welcome the submission of research contributions regarding novel sampler, sensor, and monitor techniques, as well as rapid indicators for organic chemical compounds. With these novel measurement or detection technologies, potential authors are highly encouraged to make in-depth investigations and discussions on the emission characteristics of chemical emission sources. Studies on innovative techniques regarding measurements of organic chemical emissions indoors and in workplaces are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Wen-Hsi Cheng
Prof. Dr. Chung-Shin Yuan
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • organic chemical emissions
  • air quality
  • monitoring and sampling
  • volatile organic compounds
  • air pollution measurement

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 894 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Photochemical Reactions with VOCs Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques on Data from Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations
by Edward Ming-Yang Wu and Shu-Lung Kuo
Atmosphere 2022, 13(9), 1489; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13091489 - 13 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1043
Abstract
This study assesses the concentrations of the 54 ozone precursors (all being volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) detected at the four photochemical assessment monitoring stations that are part of the air quality monitoring network in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area in Taiwan. Factor and cluster analyses [...] Read more.
This study assesses the concentrations of the 54 ozone precursors (all being volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) detected at the four photochemical assessment monitoring stations that are part of the air quality monitoring network in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area in Taiwan. Factor and cluster analyses of the multivariate statistical analysis are performed to explore the interrelationship among the 10 VOCs of relatively higher concentrations selected from the 54 ozone precursors to identify significant factors affecting ozone pollution levels in the study area. Moreover, the multivariate statistical analysis can faithfully reflect why the study area has been affected by photochemical pollution. First, results of the factor analysis suggest that the factors affecting how photochemical reactions occur in the study area can be divided into the following: “pollution from mobile sources”, “pollution from stationary sources”, and “pollution from energy sources”. Among them, mobile sources have the greatest impact on photochemical pollution levels. Second, the impacts of photochemical pollution on air quality in the study area can be classified into four clusters via cluster analysis. Each cluster represents how the 10 VOCs affect air quality, with different characteristics, and how they contribute to photochemical pollution in the study area. If there are more types and samples of photochemical pollutants when performing a multivariate statistical analysis, the analysis results will be more stable. This study adopts data on VOC monitoring over a period of nearly two years, which can effectively improve the validity and reliability of the factor analysis results, while helping environmental agencies review the effectiveness of air quality management in the future and serving as reference for the effectiveness of reducing photochemical pollution in the atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Chemical Emissions: Sources, Measurements and Characteristics)
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18 pages, 4780 KiB  
Article
Qualifying and Quantifying the Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from the Coking Process in a Steel Plant Using an Innovative Sampling Technique
by Cheng-Tsung Shao, Wen-Hsi Cheng, Yuan-Chung Lin, Ken-Lin Chang, Kang-Shin Chen and Chung-Shin Yuan
Atmosphere 2022, 13(9), 1363; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13091363 - 26 Aug 2022
Viewed by 1633
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to quantify the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a coke oven in a steel plant in Taiwan and estimate the emission factors of VOCs using an innovative sampling technique. The identification of VOCs emissions [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to quantify the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a coke oven in a steel plant in Taiwan and estimate the emission factors of VOCs using an innovative sampling technique. The identification of VOCs emissions was referred to in the AP-42 report issued by the USEPA and the field measurement data of fugitive emissions. VOCs were sampled using a self-designed closed sampling system. A total of six emission points, including quenching emissions, charge lid emissions, combustion stack emissions, door emissions, charging emissions, and coke pushing emissions, were identified in the coking process after comparing with the report of AP-42, and the emission factor of VOCs was 0.030 kg/ton-coke. It showed that the emission factor of VOCs via field measurement was approximately 56% of that reported by Taiwan EPA. Therefore, VOCs emissions estimated by the Taiwan EPA would be highly overestimated than those from the coke oven in the site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Chemical Emissions: Sources, Measurements and Characteristics)
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13 pages, 2150 KiB  
Article
Characteristics and Impact of VOCs on Ozone Formation Potential in a Petrochemical Industrial Area, Thailand
by Nattaporn Pinthong, Sarawut Thepanondh, Vanitchaya Kultan and Jutarat Keawboonchu
Atmosphere 2022, 13(5), 732; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13050732 - 3 May 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3251
Abstract
In this study, the ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were intensively measured from January 2012 to December 2016 using an evacuated canister and were analyzed using a gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS) based on the US EPA TO-15 in the community and [...] Read more.
In this study, the ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were intensively measured from January 2012 to December 2016 using an evacuated canister and were analyzed using a gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS) based on the US EPA TO-15 in the community and industrial areas of the largest petroleum refinery and petrochemical industrial complex in Map Ta Phut Thailand. The ternary diagram was used to identify the source of VOCs. Reactivity of VOCs on their ozone formation potential (OFP) were quantified by the maximum incremental reactivity coefficient method (MIR) and propylene-equivalent concentration methods. Results from the study revealed that aromatic hydrocarbon was the dominant group of VOCs greatly contributing to the total concentration of measured VOCs. Among the measured VOCs species, toluene had the highest concentration and contributed as the major precursor to ozone formation. The ternary analysis of benzene:toluene:ethybenzene ratios indicated that VOCs mainly originated from mobile sources and industrial processes. Within the industrial area, measured VOC concentration was dominated by halogenated hydrocarbons, and alkene was the highest contributor to ozone formation. The propylene-equivalent concentration method was also used to evaluate the reactivity of VOCs and their role in ozone formation, and secondly to support findings from the MIR method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Chemical Emissions: Sources, Measurements and Characteristics)
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