Special Issue "Climate Extremes in the Pannonian Basin: Current Approaches and Challenges"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Adina-Eliza Croitoru
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical and Technical Geography, Faculty of Geography, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: climate change; climate extremes; urban climate; climate change impact

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, most of the regions around the world have experienced increasingly significant climate changes. Changes in climate extremes are one of the most important topics in modern climate science, due to their major impact on the environment and society. The aim of this Special Issue is to address different approaches and methodologies in analysing climate extremes in the Pannonian Basin, which is the focus area of the Pannonian Basin Experiment (PannEx) Regional Hydroclimate Project of the Global Energy and Water Exchanges Project of the World Meteorological Organisation (GEWEX). This Special Issue intends to cover topics to support our ability to understand and predict climate extremes on both continental and local scales by improving the knowledge of environmental water and energy exchanges on a regional scale related to: the analysis of observation data; synoptic and seasonal conditions generating climate extremes and their impact on a local scale; changes detected in the historical records or estimated based on the modelled data; the social, economic, and environmental impacts of climate extremes; perception, public policies and strategies to be implemented at urban, local and/or regional levels. We invite researchers to submit papers for this Special Issue focusing on climate extremes in the Pannonian Basin region.

This Special Issue is open to all publications on climate extremes (research or review papers) in the Pannonian Basin.

Prof. Dr. Adina-Eliza Croitoru
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • climate extremes
  • climate extremes impact
  • climate extreme policy
  • climate change
  • Pannonian Basin

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis between Daily Extreme Temperature and Precipitation Values Derived from Observations and Gridded Datasets in North-Western Romania
Atmosphere 2021, 12(3), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12030361 - 09 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Climate gridded datasets are highly needed and useful in conducting data analysis for research and practical purposes. They provide long-term information on various climatic variables for large areas worldwide, making them suitable for use at any spatial level. It is essential to assess [...] Read more.
Climate gridded datasets are highly needed and useful in conducting data analysis for research and practical purposes. They provide long-term information on various climatic variables for large areas worldwide, making them suitable for use at any spatial level. It is essential to assess the accuracy of gridded data by comparing the data to measured values, especially when they are used as input parameters for hydro-climatic models. From the multitude of databases available for North-western Romania, we selected three, particularly the European Climate Assessment and Dataset (E-OBS), the Romanian Climatic Dataset (ROCADA), and the Climate of the Carpathian Region (CARPATCLIM). In this paper, we analyse the extreme precipitation and temperature data derived from the above-mentioned datasets over a common 50-year period (1961–2010) and compare the data with raw values to estimate the degree of uncertainty for each set of data. The observation data, recorded at two meteorological stations located in a complex topography region, were compared to the output of the gridded datasets, by using descriptive statistics for the mean and extreme annual and seasonal temperature and precipitation data, and trend analyses. The main findings are: the high suitability of the ROCADA gridded database for climate trend analysis and of the E-OBS gridded database for extreme temperature and precipitation analysis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Weather in the Hungarian Lowland from the Point of View of Humans
Atmosphere 2021, 12(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12010084 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 588
Abstract
Weather at different locations in the Hungarian lowland in different seasons (winter, summer) and times of day (morning, noon) is investigated from the human biometeorological point of view. Human thermal load characteristics of weather are described in terms of clothing resistance and operative [...] Read more.
Weather at different locations in the Hungarian lowland in different seasons (winter, summer) and times of day (morning, noon) is investigated from the human biometeorological point of view. Human thermal load characteristics of weather are described in terms of clothing resistance and operative temperature. Individual human thermal load–thermal sensation relationships have been estimated to study weather variation in the cities of Sopron (cooler part of Hungary) and Szeged (warmer part of Hungary). In the clothing resistance model, the humans are walking at a speed of 1.1 ms−1 in outdoor conditions without sweating. The main findings are as follows. (1) In the early summer mornings, the weather is sensed as “neutral” or “cool”, in these cases the inter-person variation effect is very small. (2) At noon in summer, heat stresses (clothing resistance parameter values less than −2 clo) are registered. In these cases, high temperature and irradiation, as well as low or moderate wind, characterized the atmospheric environment. Then, the inter-person variation effect is clearly visible. (3) The strength of summer heat excess at noon seems to be larger than the strength of winter heat deficit in the early morning. (4) Clothing resistance differences caused by inter-person variations and by weather variations between the cities of Sopron and Szeged are comparable in the majority of cases. When they are not comparable, the site variation effect is much larger than the inter-person variation effect. The clothing resistance model is constructed for individual use and it can be equally applied on both weather and climate data. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Aridity in the Central and Southern Pannonian Basin
Atmosphere 2020, 11(12), 1269; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121269 - 24 Nov 2020
Viewed by 744
Abstract
For the investigation of geographical, monthly, seasonal, and annual distributions of aridity and its annual trend in the region of the Central and Southern Pannonian Basin (CSPB), which includes the territories of Hungary and Vojvodina (Northern Serbia), the De Martonne Aridity Index (DMAI) [...] Read more.
For the investigation of geographical, monthly, seasonal, and annual distributions of aridity and its annual trend in the region of the Central and Southern Pannonian Basin (CSPB), which includes the territories of Hungary and Vojvodina (Northern Serbia), the De Martonne Aridity Index (DMAI) was used. The DMAI was originally calculated from a total of 78 meteorological stations with the maximum available time series of climatological data in three cases: 1931–2017 for Hungary; 1949–2017 for Vojvodina; and 1949–2017 for Hungary and Vojvodina jointly. The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was used to control the DMAI results. Temperature and precipitation trends were also investigated to understand their effects on the aridity trend. Three aridity types are distinguished on the annual level, five on the seasonal level, and four on the monthly level. The annual aridity had no trends in all three periods. It seems that aridity can be considered a more stable climate indicator of climate change than the temperature, at least in the CSPB. Full article
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