Special Issue "Air-Sea Interaction and Ocean Dynamics"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land–Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2021) | Viewed by 1831

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francois G. Schmitt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Oceanology and Geosciences, UMR LOG, 28 avenue Foch, 62930 Wimereux, France
Interests: turbulence; nonlinear processes in geosciences; oceanography
Dr. Fangda Cui
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: air-sea interaction; wind waves; wave dynamics; Langmuir circulation; atmosphere boundary layer
Dr. Bo Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: heat and mass transfer; aerosol transport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Air–sea interaction is one of the essential processes for ocean dynamics. Air–sea exchange of heat, vapor, particles, contaminants and momentum can affect ocean waves/currents, sea surface temperature, and seawater composition. Our understanding of air–sea interaction on ocean dynamics remains lacking or nebulous in many areas due in large part to incomplete fundamental knowledge, the large range of scales involved, the scarcity of measurements, and inadequate representation in models, such as the effects of air–sea heat and momentum fluxes on upper ocean turbulence, wind-wave generation and Langmuir circulation, and ocean biochemistry. In this context, this Special Issue is aimed at addressing the most outstanding issues in these areas in the hope of capturing the most up-to-date advancement of air–sea interaction science with a focus on ocean dynamics.

Dr. Francois G. Schmitt
Dr. Fangda Cui
Dr. Bo Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • air-sea fluxes
  • marine atmospheric boundary layer
  • marine surface layer modeling
  • coupling between surface winds and ocean waves
  • wind waves and langmuir circulation
  • turbulence scaling within atmospheric/ocean boundary layer
  • offshore wind energy
  • coupling atmospheric models with oceanic models
  • see breeze dynamics
  • storms and rogue waves
  • aerosols transport over sea surface

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Turbulence of Landward and Seaward Wind during Sea-Breeze Days within the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer
Atmosphere 2021, 12(12), 1563; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12121563 - 26 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Reynolds stress anisotropy is estimated from the stress spheroids, based on 20 Hz ultrasonic anemometer measurements, performed in the coastal area of northern France, over a 1.5-year long period. Size and shape variation (i.e., prolate, oblate, disk, rod, etc.) of stress spheroids are [...] Read more.
Reynolds stress anisotropy is estimated from the stress spheroids, based on 20 Hz ultrasonic anemometer measurements, performed in the coastal area of northern France, over a 1.5-year long period. Size and shape variation (i.e., prolate, oblate, disk, rod, etc.) of stress spheroids are used for the characterization of energy redistribution by turbulent eddies. The sea-breeze (SB) events were identified using a change in wind direction from seaward (SWD) to landward (LWD) during the day time. We found that the LWD wind creates more turbulent anisotropic states than SWD wind. The prolate-shaped stress spheroids correspond to small-scale turbulence observed during LWD wind, while oblate spheroids are found during SWD winds. Moreover, it was found that during LWD winds, large turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in the flow field produces large stress spheroids. On the contrary, during SWD winds, a smaller level of TKE is responsible for small-size stress spheroid formation. The average volume of the corresponding Reynolds stress spheroids during the LWD is 13% larger than that of during SWD wind. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air-Sea Interaction and Ocean Dynamics)
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Article
Diagnostic Analysis of the Generative Mechanism of Extratropical Cyclones in the Northwest Pacific and Northwest Atlantic
Atmosphere 2021, 12(10), 1326; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12101326 - 11 Oct 2021
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Abstract
We investigated the early-stage development of cyclones occurring in the strong baroclinic regions in the Northwest Pacific and the Northwest Atlantic based on European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis-Interim (ERA-Interim) data. The composite background conditions corresponding to the cyclones on the onset [...] Read more.
We investigated the early-stage development of cyclones occurring in the strong baroclinic regions in the Northwest Pacific and the Northwest Atlantic based on European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis-Interim (ERA-Interim) data. The composite background conditions corresponding to the cyclones on the onset day are characterized by upper troposphere divergence of westerly jet ahead of a trough, low troposphere convergence of westerly jet behind a trough, and strong meridional air temperature gradient (baroclinicity) both in the Northwest Pacific and the Northwest Atlantic, but with stronger baroclinicity in the Northwest Pacific. The composite velocity and temperature fields of the cyclone on the onset day show a clear horizontal front and a westward and northward vertical tilting of cyclonic circulation to the cold zone. The composite Northwest Pacific cyclone filed on the onset day has a warm core, whereas the composite Northwest Atlantic cyclone field has a cold core in the low troposphere. The leading adiabatic processes that contribute to the developing of the cold core cyclone in the Northwest Atlantic on the onset day is the temperature advection, while stronger vertical motion induces stronger adiabatic warming in the Northwest Pacific cyclones, which has a significant contribution to the development of warm core cyclones on the onset day. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air-Sea Interaction and Ocean Dynamics)
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