Special Issue "Wastewater Treatment Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jaecheul Yu
Website
Guest Editor
Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Korea
Interests: conventional and advanced wastewater treatment; biological waste treatment; biological nitrogen removal… shortcut nitrogen removal; microbial electrochemical wastewater treatment; microbial community

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wastewater treatment technology has a history spanning thousands of years, while the activated sludge process is only 100 years old. Wastewater treatment technology has been developed by combining basic science such as chemistry, microbiology, and biochemistry with various engineering technologies such as civil engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology.

To solve global problems such as water shortage and energy crisis, wastewater is recognized as a resource, and various wastewater treatment technologies are being researched.

Thus, this Special Issue aims to collect and present all breakthrough research on all wastewater treatment technologies, including activated sludge, anaerobic digestion, membrane bioreactor, membrane aerated biofilm reactors, microbial electrochemical technology and others, removal mechanisms, and microbial communities. The scope of this Special Issue covers but is not limited to the following topics:

  • Conventional and advanced wastewater treatment technologies (including AS, AD, MBR and others);
  • Energy-neutral or low-energy wastewater treatment technologies (MABR, ANAMMOX, and others);
  • Nitrogen or phosphorus removal technologies;
  • Removal mechanism and microbial communities in wastewater treatment processes.

Dr. Jaecheul Yu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater treatment (conventional, advanced, & biological)
  • nutrient removal (nitrogen & phosphorus)
  • nitrogen removal (nitrification, denitrification, & ANANMMOX)
  • energy-neutral or low energy wastewater treatment
  • microbial electrochemical wastewater treatment
  • microbial community

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effects of a Hydraulic Series Connection and Flow Direction on Electricity Generation in a Stack Connected with Different Volume MFCs
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031019 - 23 Jan 2021
Abstract
Three microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with different volumes (S-, M-, and L-MFCs) were operated at individual flow (phase I) and serially connected flow modes (phase II for forward flow and phase III for reverse flow) at the same flow rate. The three MFCs [...] Read more.
Three microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with different volumes (S-, M-, and L-MFCs) were operated at individual flow (phase I) and serially connected flow modes (phase II for forward flow and phase III for reverse flow) at the same flow rate. The three MFCs showed different voltages and power generation according to the hydraulic and electric connection modes. The M- and L-MFCs showed a similar voltage at hydraulic series-forward flow mode (phase II). The principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson correlation showed that voltage generation and power density were affected by volume, hydraulic retention time (HRT), chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate, removed COD, and internal resistances. When they were connected electrically in series and parallel, the stack showed relatively lower voltage loss (28–30%) compared to the voltage losses of the other stacks (43–94%). These results suggest an easy way to connect MFCs with different volumes can be a new option to avoid voltage reversal and minimize energy loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Treatment Technologies)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Marine Actinobacteria Bioflocculant: A Storehouse of Unique Biotechnological Resources for Wastewater Treatment and Other Applications
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7671; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217671 - 30 Oct 2020
Abstract
The bioactive compounds produced by actinobacteria have played a major role in antimicrobials, bioremediation, biofuels, enzymes, and anti-cancer activities. Biodegradable microbial flocculants have been produced by bacteria, algae, and fungi. Microbial bioflocculants have also attracted biotechnology importance over chemical flocculants as a result [...] Read more.
The bioactive compounds produced by actinobacteria have played a major role in antimicrobials, bioremediation, biofuels, enzymes, and anti-cancer activities. Biodegradable microbial flocculants have been produced by bacteria, algae, and fungi. Microbial bioflocculants have also attracted biotechnology importance over chemical flocculants as a result of degradability and environmentally friendly attributes they possess. Though, freshwater actinobacteria flocculants have been explored in bioflocculation. Yet, there is a paucity of information on the application of actinobacteria flocculants isolated from the marine environment. Similarly, marine habitats that supported the biodiversity of actinobacteria strains in the field of biotechnology have been underexplored in bioflocculation. Hence, this review reiterates the need to optimize culture conditions and other parameters that affect bioflocculant production by using a response surface model or artificial neural network. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Treatment Technologies)
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