Special Issue "Sustainable Construction Materials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Martínez-García Carmen
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Environmental and Material Engineering, High Polytechnic School of Linares, University of Jaen, Jaén, Spain
Interests: sustainable materials; circular economy; recycling; lightweight aggregate; materials engineering; advanced materials; construction materials; waste recovery
Prof. Cotes-Palomino María Teresa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Environmental and Material Engineering, High Polytechnic School of Linares, University of Jaen, Jaén, Spain
Interests: sustainable materials; circular economy; recycling; lightweight aggregate; materials engineering; advanced materials. construction materials. waste recovery

Special Issue Information

It is a fact that the materials industry is strategic for the world economy and, thus, a leading technological sector. Therefore, any contribution made to the improvement of this industry is of great scientific and economic interest.

The circular economy model gives waste a fundamental role, based on its intelligent reuse, to convert it into raw material for new technological products, thus, reducing energy expenditure and generating value as an asset for industry and companies.

The technological development points towards a synergetic functioning of the combination of different materials. Therefore, the research and development of multifunctional and sustainable materials that can provide a degree of technological innovation to the various sectors that use them, are essential in any activity where direct and indirect impacts on the environment are generated.

Prof. Martínez-García Carmen
Prof. Cotes-Palomino María Teresa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • materials engineering
  • production technology
  • process engineering
  • clean technologies
  • circular economy
  • life cycle assessment
  • ceramics
  • geopolymerization
  • photocatalytic materials
  • sustainable construction
  • end of waste
  • advanced materials.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability Analysis of the M-30 Madrid Tunnels and Madrid Río after 14 years of Service Life
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7368; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207368 - 21 Oct 2020
Abstract
In 2007, the excavation of the M-30 ring road located in Madrid and the creation of a green corridor either side of the Manzanares river brought significant change to the metropolitan area. The corridor and linear park which it provided were designed to [...] Read more.
In 2007, the excavation of the M-30 ring road located in Madrid and the creation of a green corridor either side of the Manzanares river brought significant change to the metropolitan area. The corridor and linear park which it provided were designed to contribute to the regeneration of the fluvial ecosystem, establish links among residents on each side of the river and promote cultural and leisure activities. This paper provides a sustainability analysis of the excavation of the M-30 (involving the socio-economic and environmental impact) 14 years after its construction. In order to show such an impact, an analysis of the area both prior to the project and after completion, as well as a hypothetical solution that uses improved materials, has been performed. This entails use of the multi-criteria decision-making model named MIVES (initials in Spanish, modelo integrado de valor para una evaluación sostenible). The MIVES method is based on the application of value functions of sustainability indicators selected by socio-economic and environmental criteria, chosen by experts. Results from analysis showed that the excavation of the M-30 considerably improved the sustainability of the area (sustainable index 3.43 and 6.26 both before and after the excavation works). However, use of improved materials in contrast with the application of conventional materials slightly improved the sustainability of the work (Sustainability Index 6.26 and 6.74, respectively, of the conventional materials). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Construction Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Glass-Ceramic Foams from Alkali-Activated Vitrified Bottom Ash and Waste Glasses
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5714; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165714 - 18 Aug 2020
Abstract
Both vitrified bottom ashes (VBAs) and waste glasses are forms of inorganic waste material that are widely landfilled, despite having some economic potential. Building on previous studies, we prepared glass-ceramic foams by the combination of VBA with either soda-lime glass (SLG) or borosilicate [...] Read more.
Both vitrified bottom ashes (VBAs) and waste glasses are forms of inorganic waste material that are widely landfilled, despite having some economic potential. Building on previous studies, we prepared glass-ceramic foams by the combination of VBA with either soda-lime glass (SLG) or borosilicate glass (BSG). Suspensions of fine powders in weakly alkaline solution underwent gelation, followed by frothing at nearly room temperature. Hardened “green” foams were sintered, with concurrent crystallization, at 850–1000 °C. All foams were highly porous (>70%), with mostly open porosity. The glass addition was fundamental in both gelation (promoting the formation of carbonate and silicate hydrated phases) and firing steps. While SLG addition enhanced the viscous flow sintering, without a significant impact on the crystallization of gehlenite, the main crystalline phase from the devitrification of VBA, BSG addition caused a reactive sintering, with remarkable changes in the phase assemblage. The glass addition generally also allowed lower sintering temperatures and yielded products with excellent crushing strength. However, only specific conditions resulted in the complete immobilization of pollutants (e.g., Cr3+ ions). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Construction Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Feasibility of Developing Sustainable Concrete Using Environmentally Friendly Coarse Aggregate
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5207; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155207 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
Quarry aggregate reserves are depleting rapidly within Australia and the rest of the world due to an increasing demand for aggregates driven by expansion in construction. The annual production of premix concrete in Australia is approximately 30 million cubic meters, while 3–5% of [...] Read more.
Quarry aggregate reserves are depleting rapidly within Australia and the rest of the world due to an increasing demand for aggregates driven by expansion in construction. The annual production of premix concrete in Australia is approximately 30 million cubic meters, while 3–5% of concrete delivered to site remains unused and is disposed of in landfill or crushing plants. The production of coarse aggregates using this waste concrete is potentially a sustainable approach to reduce environmental and economic impact. A testing program has been conducted to investigate mechanical performance and permeation characteristics of concrete produced using a novel manufactured coarse aggregate recycled directly from fresh premix concrete. The recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete satisfied the specified 28-day design strength of 25 MPa and 40 MPa at 28 days and a mean compressive strength of 60 MPa at 90 days. Aggregate grading was observed to determine strength development, while low water absorption, low drying shrinkage, and higher packing density indicate that the RCA concrete is a high-quality material with a dense pore structure. The rough fracture surface of the aggregate increased the bond between C-S-H gel matrix and RCA at the interfacial transition zone. Furthermore, a good correlation was observed between compressive strength and all other mechanical properties displayed by the quarried aggregate concrete. The application of design equations as stated in Australian standards were observed to provide a conservative design for RCA concrete structures based on the mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Construction Materials)
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