Special Issue "Advanced Methods for Seismic Performance Evaluation of Building Structures"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Sang Whan Han
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, 222, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul, Korea, 04763
Interests: seismic design and performance evaluation; structural dynamics; seismic hazard and risk analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Earthquakes are one of the most dangerous natural events inflicting damage and collapse of buildings and infrastructures. In particular, 10,000 people lose their lives on average from earthquakes each year. Not only do earthquakes come in different sizes, they could also occur anywhere in the globe. The demand to reduce the risk associated with earthquakes has been growing every year and leading to a greater research focus on seismic design and seismic performance evaluation. Recently, the performance-based seismic engineering approach has been adopted in the earthquake engineering community. In this approach, multiple seismic performance objectives are specified explicitly, which are defined with combinations of seismic hazard levels and structural and non-structural performance levels, unlike conventional prescriptive design approaches. Critical components of performance-based seismic design and evaluation procedures include state-of-art technologies relating seismic hazard analyses, robust numerical simulation frameworks, and sophisticated performance-based seismic design and assessment methodologies. Although major technologies have been developed, many challenging obstacles have to be solved to make them implemented in code provisions. The Special Issue of the journal Applied Sciences on “Advanced Methods for Seismic Performance Evaluation of Building Structures” aims to cover recent advances in the development of major components of seismic performance evaluation and design.

Prof. Sang Whan Han
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Numerical models
  • Model parameters
  • Analysis algorithm
  • Seismic performance evaluation
  • Seismic risk
  • Seismic hazards
  • Seismic force resisting systems
  • Energy dissipaters
  • Seismic design and mitigation
  • Assessment method
  • Ground motions
  • Nonlinear response

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Retrofit Existing Frame Structures to Increase Their Economy and Sustainability in High Seismic Hazard Regions
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5486; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245486 (registering DOI) - 13 Dec 2019
Abstract
The study proposes a retrofitting method with an optimum design of viscous dampers in order to improve the structural resistant capacity to earthquakes. The retrofitting method firstly uses a 2D frame model and places the viscous dampers in the structure to satisfy the [...] Read more.
The study proposes a retrofitting method with an optimum design of viscous dampers in order to improve the structural resistant capacity to earthquakes. The retrofitting method firstly uses a 2D frame model and places the viscous dampers in the structure to satisfy the performance requirements under code-specific design earthquake intensities and then performs an optimum design to increase the structural collapse-resistant capacity. The failure pattern analysis and fragility analysis show that the optimum design leads to better performance than the original frame structure. For regular structures, it is demonstrated that the optimum pattern of viscous damper placement obtained from a 2D frame model can be directly used in the retrofitting of the 3D frame model. The economic loss and repair time analyses are conducted for the retrofitted frame structure under different earthquake intensities, including the frequent earthquake, the occasional earthquake, and the rare earthquake. Although the proposed method is based on time-history analyses, it seems that the computational cost is acceptable because the 2D frame model is adopted to determine the optimum pattern of viscous damper placement; meanwhile, the owner can clearly know the economic benefits of the retrofitting under different earthquake intensities. The retrofitting also causes the frame to have reduced environmental problems (such as carbon emission) compared to the original frame in the repair process after a rare earthquake happens. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Finite Element Steady-State Vibration Analysis Considering Frequency-Dependent Soil-Pile Interaction
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(24), 5371; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9245371 - 09 Dec 2019
Abstract
The vibration response of equipment foundation structures is not only affected by the structural stiffness and mass, but also greatly influenced by the degree of a soil-foundation structural interaction. Furthermore, the vibratory performance of equipment foundation structures supported by pile systems largely depends [...] Read more.
The vibration response of equipment foundation structures is not only affected by the structural stiffness and mass, but also greatly influenced by the degree of a soil-foundation structural interaction. Furthermore, the vibratory performance of equipment foundation structures supported by pile systems largely depends on the soil-pile dynamic stiffness and damping, which are variable in nature within the speed range that machines operate at. This paper reviews a method for evaluating effective soil-pile stiffness and damping that can be computed by Novak’s method or by commercial software (DYNA6, University of Western Ontario). A series of Finite Element (FE) time history and steady-state analyses using SAP2000 have been performed to examine the effects of dynamic soil-pile-foundation interaction on the vibration performance of equipment foundations, such as large compressor foundations and steam/gas turbine foundations. Frequency-dependent stiffness is estimated to be higher than frequency-independent stiffness, in general, and, thus, affects the vibration calculation. This paper provides a full-spectrum steady-state vibration solution, which increases the reliability of the foundation’s structural design. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Seismic Behavior of Steel Plate-Concrete Shear Walls with Holes
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5255; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235255 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Steel plate-concrete shear walls (SPSW) are used as the containment in nuclear power stations. However, the influence of holes and axial loading on the behavior of steel plate-concrete shear walls is neglected in most studies. Thus, it is necessary to understand the seismic [...] Read more.
Steel plate-concrete shear walls (SPSW) are used as the containment in nuclear power stations. However, the influence of holes and axial loading on the behavior of steel plate-concrete shear walls is neglected in most studies. Thus, it is necessary to understand the seismic behavior of SPSW members with holes in order to avoid the potential risks for nuclear power stations. In this study, a series of specimens were tested by low-cycle reciprocal loading. The specimens were designed with different holes to simulate real members in nuclear power stations. A hysteretic curve of specimens was obtained from a low-cycle reciprocal test to discuss the seismic behavior of steel plate-concrete shear walls (SPSW). Moreover, effects of axial compression ratio, hole size, thickness of the steel plate, and hole position on the hysteretic performance of SPSW were analyzed. The horizontal ultimate bearing capacity of SPSW specimens was estimated using the norms of the Architecture Institute of Japan and the calculation method of Ono reduction rate. Results provide theoretical references for the design and application of SPSW with holes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Calibration Factor for ASCE 41-17 Modeling Parameters for Stocky Rectangular RC Columns
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(23), 5193; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9235193 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
Existing old reinforced concrete (RC) buildings could be vulnerable to large earthquake events. Most columns in such buildings have insufficient reinforcement details, which may experience failure during an early loading stage. The failure of columns may lead to partial or complete collapse of [...] Read more.
Existing old reinforced concrete (RC) buildings could be vulnerable to large earthquake events. Most columns in such buildings have insufficient reinforcement details, which may experience failure during an early loading stage. The failure of columns may lead to partial or complete collapse of entire building systems. To prepare for an adequate retrofit plan for columns, it is necessary to simulate the cyclic behavior of columns using a numerical model with adequate values of constituent modeling parameters. The nonlinear component modeling parameters are specified in ASCE 41-17. However, the experiments on stocky RC columns suggest that ASCE 41-17 nonlinear component modeling parameters do not reflect the RC column behavior adequately. To accurately simulate the nonlinear load–deformation responses of stocky RC columns with low span-to-depth ratio, this study proposes a calibration factor for ASCE 41-17 RC column modeling parameters. For this purpose, this study collected test data of 47 stocky column specimens. Based on the test data, empirical equations including the calibration factor for modeling parameters “a” and “b” in ASCE 41-17 were proposed. The accuracy of the proposed equation was verified by comparing the measured and calculated envelope curves. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Development of an ANN-Based Lumped Plasticity Model of RC Columns Using Historical Pseudo-Static Cyclic Test Data
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(20), 4263; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9204263 - 11 Oct 2019
Abstract
This study explores the possibility of using an ANN-based model for the rapid numerical simulation and seismic performance prediction of reinforced concrete (RC) columns. The artificial neural network (ANN) method is implemented to model the relationship between the input features of RC columns [...] Read more.
This study explores the possibility of using an ANN-based model for the rapid numerical simulation and seismic performance prediction of reinforced concrete (RC) columns. The artificial neural network (ANN) method is implemented to model the relationship between the input features of RC columns and the critical parameters of the commonly used lumped plasticity (LP) model: The strength and the yielding, capping and ultimate deformation capacity. Cyclic test data of 1163 column specimens obtained from the PEER and NEEShub database and other sources are collected and divided into the training set, test set and validation set for the ANN model. The effectiveness of the proposed ANN model is validated by comparing it with existing explicit formulas and experimental results. Results indicated that the developed model can effectively predict the strength and deformation capacities of RC columns. Furthermore, the response of two RC frame structures under static force and strong ground motion were simulated by the ANN-based, bi-linear and tri-linear LP model method. The good agreement between the proposed model and test results validated that the ANN-based method can provide sufficiently accurate model parameters for modeling the seismic response of RC columns using the LP model. Full article
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