Special Issue "Innovative Textiles in the Era of Circular Economy"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rocco Furferi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Technology, University of Florence, Italy. Via di Santa Marta 3, 50139, Firenze, Italy
Interests: textile engineering; machine vision; artificial neural networks; spectrophotometry; colorimetry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is in the context of the “Sustainable Industry”, with particular reference to the development of “advanced production systems” and the development of “advanced materials” in the textile sector.
The Issue aims to promote papers related to the textile field aiming at the development of a range of sustainable processes, technologies, products, and actions for the improvement of human wellbeing and social equity, significantly reducing environmental risks and ecological shortcomings related to the development of textile products.
Contributing papers can vary from basic science to practical methods and from new developments in textiles to future perspectives.
In the Special Issue, we want to address, in particular, but not exclusively, recent advances in the following topics:

  • Circular Economy approaches for the textile industry;
  • Design of new generation of yarns, fabrics, and garments;
  • Design of fashion textile products using regenerated wool;
  • Design of textile products using sustainable materials (e.g., organic cotton);
  • Design of textile products improving health and wellness;
  • Ecofriendly processes for fabric manufacturing (including dyeing and finishing)’
  • Life Cycle Assessment of textiles manufacturing;
  • Sustainable processes;
  • Environment impact of the textile industry;
  • Textile waste management;
  • Smart materials;
  • Bio-based materials;
  • Smart processes;
  • New generation of yarns and fabrics quality assessment systems;
  • Sustainable nonwoven fabrics.

Prof. Dr. Rocco Furferi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • regenerated wool
  • sustainable fabrics
  • textile design
  • life cycle assessment
  • ecofriendly textiles
  • ecofriendly dyeing and finishing
  • bio-based meterials
  • sustainable process
  • nonwoven sustainable fabrics
  • circular economy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Design and Manufacturing of an Innovative Triple-Layer Thermo-Insulated Fabric
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020680 - 18 Jan 2020
Abstract
Materials used for creating fabrics featuring insulation and thermoregulation are typically made of multi-layer materials consisting of two outer layers and inner padding, traditionally made from goose or duck feathers or even with synthetic materials. In this context, the development of a fabric [...] Read more.
Materials used for creating fabrics featuring insulation and thermoregulation are typically made of multi-layer materials consisting of two outer layers and inner padding, traditionally made from goose or duck feathers or even with synthetic materials. In this context, the development of a fabric in which the insulation is carried out directly thanks to the structure of its weave, i.e., where the thermoregulation function is entrusted to one of the yarns (suitably volumized to reduce its density and trap the air) may be an important improvement compared to the state of the art. Accordingly, the present work describes the development of a new kind of triple-layer thermo-insulated innovative fabric (named T4Innovation), in which the thermal insulation is not obtained by means of a padding but rather through the use of appropriate volumized yarns, able to ensure thermal insulation in a reduced thickness. This fabric is manufactured in a single weaving phase, greatly facilitating the subsequent operations of the garment maker. The designed and manufactured fabric was extensively tested to assess its performance. The test demonstrated the effectiveness of such a new class of textile product in terms of thermal performance, which is comparable to the ones of a padded material. Since T4Innovation demonstrates aesthetic properties very close to that of traditional unpadded fabrics, its future commercialization could open new horizons in terms of design, fashion, and style, which are cornerstones of the fashion textile industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Textiles in the Era of Circular Economy)
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