Special Issue "Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Patrick Tang
Website
Guest Editor
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Interests: building materials; energy-efficient concrete; nanomaterials in cement-based composites; structural lightweight concrete and waste management.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Green concrete is defined as a concrete that uses waste material as at least one of its components, or has a production process that does not lead to environmental destruction, or has high performance in terms of energy efficiency and life cycle sustainability. Natural resources are running out. Using industrial and construction waste as raw materials for the production of cement and concrete can be regarded as a valuable resource for civil infrastructure construction. Green concrete or cement-based composites will not only contribute to a circular economy, but can also help to reduce the amount of embodied energy and CO2 emissions associated with cement manufacturing and aggregate quarrying, as well as to mitigate the environmental threats associated with industrial waste materials.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences “Green Concrete for Better Sustainable Environment” will cover recent advances in the development of green concrete solutions and deliberate on what best can be done to leverage the opportunities.

Proposed Topics

This Special Issue proposes (but is not limited to) the following topics:

  • Environmental friendly concrete
  • Recycled concrete
  • Geopolymer composite
  • Industrial wastes utilization in concrete
  • Energy-efficient concrete
  • Reusable or recyclable construction materials
  • Design for long life and adaptability

Prof. Dr. Patrick Tang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green concrete
  • Industrial by-products
  • Geopolymer
  • Construction and demolition waste
  • Thermal energy storage concrete
  • Recycled materials
  • Supplementary cementitious materials
  • Life-cycle analysis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Environmental Evaluation of Concrete Containing Recycled and By-Product Aggregates Based on Life Cycle Assessment
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7503; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217503 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
This study aims to compare the potential environmental impact of the manufacture and production of recycled and by-product aggregates based on a life cycle assessment and to evaluate the environmental impact and cost when they are used as aggregates in concrete. To this [...] Read more.
This study aims to compare the potential environmental impact of the manufacture and production of recycled and by-product aggregates based on a life cycle assessment and to evaluate the environmental impact and cost when they are used as aggregates in concrete. To this end, the six potential environmental impacts (i.e., abiotic depletion potential, global warming potential, ozone-layer depletion potential, acidification potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and eutrophication potential) of the manufacture and production of natural sand, natural gravel, recycled aggregate, slag aggregate, bottom ash aggregate, and waste glass aggregate were compared using information from life cycle inventory databases. Additionally, the environmental impacts and cost were evaluated when these aggregates were used to replace 30% of the fine and coarse aggregates in concrete with a design strength of 24 MPa. The environmental impact of concrete that incorporated slag aggregate as the fine aggregates or bottom ash aggregate as the coarse aggregates were lower than that of concrete that incorporated natural aggregate. However, concrete that incorporated bottom ash aggregate as the fine aggregates demonstrated relatively high environmental impacts. Based on these environmental impacts, the environmental cost was found to range from 5.88 to 8.79 USD/m3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II)
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Open AccessArticle
A Comparative Study of Random Forest and Genetic Engineering Programming for the Prediction of Compressive Strength of High Strength Concrete (HSC)
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7330; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207330 - 20 Oct 2020
Abstract
Supervised machine learning and its algorithm is an emerging trend for the prediction of mechanical properties of concrete. This study uses an ensemble random forest (RF) and gene expression programming (GEP) algorithm for the compressive strength prediction of high strength concrete. The parameters [...] Read more.
Supervised machine learning and its algorithm is an emerging trend for the prediction of mechanical properties of concrete. This study uses an ensemble random forest (RF) and gene expression programming (GEP) algorithm for the compressive strength prediction of high strength concrete. The parameters include cement content, coarse aggregate to fine aggregate ratio, water, and superplasticizer. Moreover, statistical analyses like MAE, RSE, and RRMSE are used to evaluate the performance of models. The RF ensemble model outbursts in performance as it uses a weak base learner decision tree and gives an adamant determination of coefficient R2 = 0.96 with fewer errors. The GEP algorithm depicts a good response in between actual values and prediction values with an empirical relation. An external statistical check is also applied on RF and GEP models to validate the variables with data points. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) and decision tree (DT) are also used on a given data sample and comparison is made with the aforementioned models. Permutation features using python are done on the variables to give an influential parameter. The machine learning algorithm reveals a strong correlation between targets and predicts with less statistical measures showing the accuracy of the entire model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II)
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Open AccessArticle
The Application of Seabed Silt in the Preparation of Artificial Algal Reefs
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7279; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207279 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
Large amounts of silt have been deposited on the seabed in China’s coastal areas due to intensive coastal development and marine raft aquaculture, which are the main causes of local marine environmental disasters. In this study, seabed silt was tested as a potential [...] Read more.
Large amounts of silt have been deposited on the seabed in China’s coastal areas due to intensive coastal development and marine raft aquaculture, which are the main causes of local marine environmental disasters. In this study, seabed silt was tested as a potential raw material for artificial reefs. The silt was mixed with cement in four proportions to create concrete specimens for use in silt artificial reefs (SARs). The compressive strength development and nutrient dissolution were examined in the SAR specimens. The hydration products of the SAR paste were investigated through X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning election microscope (SEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. The results showed that the compression strength of the SAR specimens was inversely proportional to their seabed silt content. The SAR specimens were able to continuously dissolve nitrogen-containing nutrients. The presence of Ca(OH)2, commonly found in traditional concrete, was not detected, which may help improve the seaweed adhesion and biological effects of artificial reefs. The effective utilization of seabed silt could serve to restore and improve the marine ecological environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II)
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Open AccessArticle
Energy Performance of a High-Rise Residential Building Using Fibre-Reinforced Structural Lightweight Aggregate Concrete
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4489; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134489 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The increasing need for eco-friendly green building and creative passive design technology in response to climatic change and global warming issues will continue. However, the need to preserve and sustain the natural environment is also crucial. A building envelope plays a pivotal role [...] Read more.
The increasing need for eco-friendly green building and creative passive design technology in response to climatic change and global warming issues will continue. However, the need to preserve and sustain the natural environment is also crucial. A building envelope plays a pivotal role in areas where the greatest heat and energy loss often occur. Investment for the passive design aspect of building envelopes is essential to address CO 2 emission. This research aims to explore the suitability of using integral-monolithic structural insulation fibre-reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC) without additional insulation as a building envelope material in a high-rise residential building in the different climatic zones of the world. Polypropylene and steel fibres in different dosages were used in a structural grade expanded clay lightweight aggregate concrete. Physical and thermal properties of fibre reinforced structural LWAC, normal weight concrete (NWC) and bricks were measured in the lab. The [email protected] simulation program was implemented to simulate the energy consumption of a 29-storey residential building with shear wall structural system using the proposed fibre-reinforced LWAC materials. Results showed that energy savings between 3.2% and 14.8% were incurred in buildings using the fibre-reinforced LWAC across various climatic regions as compared with traditional NWC and sand-cement brick and clay brick walls. In conclusion, fibre-reinforced LWAC in hot-humid tropical and temperate Mediterranean climates meet the certified Green Building Index (GBI) requirements of less than 150 kW∙h∙m−2. However, in extreme climatic conditions of sub-arctic and hot semi-arid desert climates, a thicker wall or additional insulation is required to meet the certified green building requirements. Hence, the energy-saving measure is influenced largely by the use of fibre-reinforced LWAC as a building envelope material rather than because of building orientation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Investigation of Chloride Uptake Performances of Hydrocalumite-Like Ca-Al LDHs with Different Microstructures
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 3760; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10113760 - 28 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, hydrocalumite-like Ca2Al-NO3 layered double hydroxides (Ca-Al LDHs) with different microstructures were synthesized. The crystalline properties, structure composition, morphology and particle size distribution of the Ca-Al LDH (CAL) samples were illustrated. To obtain the chloride uptake performances [...] Read more.
In this study, hydrocalumite-like Ca2Al-NO3 layered double hydroxides (Ca-Al LDHs) with different microstructures were synthesized. The crystalline properties, structure composition, morphology and particle size distribution of the Ca-Al LDH (CAL) samples were illustrated. To obtain the chloride uptake performances of CAL, the influences of contact time, initial concentration of Cl, pH of reaction solution and coexistence anions on the chloride uptake were examined systematically. Compared to the CAL samples obtained at a higher aging temperature, CAL synthesized at 60 °C demonstrated the minimum average particle size (6.148 μm) and the best Cl adsorption capacity (211.324 mg/g). Based on the test results, the main adsorption mechanism of chloride ion on CAL was recognized as an interlayer anion exchanging reaction other than the dissolution-precipitate mode. With the increase in the pH value of reaction solution from 7 to 13, it was found that the amount of chloride ion adsorbed by CAL increased slightly, and the solution could remain at relatively high pH value even after the adsorption. The presence of CO32− and SO42− reduced the adsorption capacity of CAL dramatically as compared with OH due to the destruction of layered structure and the formation of precipitates (CaCO3 or CaSO4). The interference sequence of the investigated anions on the chloride uptake of CAL was SO42−, CO32− and OH, and the order of interlayer anionic affinity was Cl > OH > NO3. The results illustrated that the synthesized CAL could be used as a promising chloride ion adsorbent for the corrosion inhibition of reinforcement embedded cement-based materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Concrete for a Better Sustainable Environment II)
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