Special Issue "Application of the Biocomposite Materials on Bone Reconstruction"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yung-Kang Shen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: bone/teeth repair and reconstruction; 3D/4D printing; scaffold fabrication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical materials (also known as biomaterials) are new high-tech materials used to diagnose, treat, repair or replace human tissues, organs or enhance their functions. They involve the health of hundreds of millions of people and are essential for human health. Their application not only saves the lives of tens of millions of critically ill patients but also significantly reduces the mortality of major diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and trauma and plays an important role in improving the quality of life and health of patients and reducing medical costs. The development of biomedical materials also guides the innovation of contemporary medical technology and the development of medical and health services. For example, research and development of vascular stents, interventional catheters, and instruments have promoted the formation and development of minimally invasive and interventional treatment technologies. The development of carrier materials for targeted/smart controlled release systems of active substances (such as drugs, proteins, genes, etc.) will not only lead to revolutionary changes in traditional modes of administration, but also congenital genetic defects, geriatric diseases, and tumors, and refractory treatment will open up new avenues.

Reconstruction or repair of bone function using tissue engineering techniques often requires a biomaterial. Traditionally, the materials use metals, ceramics, and polymers, but the bone itself is a composite material. Therefore, knowing how to use the correct biomedical composite material is important. The different types of materials and their percentage composition in biocomposite materials are the first level, and then the characteristics of biocomposite materials (such as surface properties, strength, hardness, surface roughness, pH value, degradation performance) will affect their applications. The cell culture and animal experiments of biocomposite materials are used to determine the suitability of the future human body. The cell interactions with biocomposite materials are very important in cell culture. Microscale patterning of cells and their environment must be emphasized in cell culture. This Special Issue welcomes innovative research on application of biocomposite materials on bone reconstruction.

Prof. Dr. Yung-Kang Shen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biocomposite materials
  • material composition and percentage
  • material characteristics
  • cell patterning
  • bone reconstruction

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Mechanobiology of Cell Response on Titanium with Multilayered Aluminum Nitride/Tantalum Thin Film
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020645 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
In the present study, the piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN)/tantalum (Ta) (PAT) thin film was investigated as a biocompatible film and osseointegrated with biomedical devices such as implants. The stress variation on the interaction of cells with the PAT surface was investigated using osteoblast-like [...] Read more.
In the present study, the piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN)/tantalum (Ta) (PAT) thin film was investigated as a biocompatible film and osseointegrated with biomedical devices such as implants. The stress variation on the interaction of cells with the PAT surface was investigated using osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and fibroblast cells (NIH3T3). A singular behavior was observed on the PAT film with a (002) texture, in which the MG-63 cells were more dispersed and displayed longer and more filopodia than the NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, the MG-63 cells showed ingrowth, adherence, and proliferation on the PAT film surface. The MG-63 cells had more obvious stress variation than the NIH3T3 cells in the differentiation and proliferation. The mechanobiological reaction to cell differentiation and proliferation not only caused osseointegration, but also reduced the surface activation energy, thus enhancing bone remodeling. The formation of a nanopolycrystalline PAT film is believed to enhance the mechanobiological effect, promoting osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of the Biocomposite Materials on Bone Reconstruction)
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Open AccessArticle
The Potential of a Nanostructured Titanium Oxide Layer with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Biomedical Applications: Surface Properties and Biomechanical Behaviors
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020590 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
This study investigated the surface properties and biomechanical behaviors of a nanostructured titanium oxide (TiO) layer with different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of phosphonate on the surface of microscope slides. The surface properties of SAMs were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, [...] Read more.
This study investigated the surface properties and biomechanical behaviors of a nanostructured titanium oxide (TiO) layer with different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of phosphonate on the surface of microscope slides. The surface properties of SAMs were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and contact angle goniometry. Biomechanical behaviors were evaluated using nanoindentation with a diamond Berkovich indenter. Analytical results indicated that the homogenous nanostructured TiO surface was formed on the substrate surface after the plasma oxidation treatment. As the TiO surface was immersed with 11-phosphonoundecanoic acid solution (PUA-SAM/TiO), the formation of a uniform SAM can be observed on the sample surface. Moreover, the binding energy of O 1s demonstrated the presence of the bisphosphonate monolayer on the SAMs-coated samples. It was also found that the PUA-SAM/TiO sample not only possessed a higher wettability performance, but also exhibited low surface contact stiffness. A SAM surface with a high wettability and low contact stiffness could potentially promote biocompatibility and prevent the formation of a stress shielding effect. Therefore, the self-assembled technology is a promising approach that can be applied to the surface modification of biomedical implants for facilitating bone healing and osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of the Biocomposite Materials on Bone Reconstruction)
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