Special Issue "Non-transfusional Hemocomponents in Oral Surgery and Implantology: From Biology to the Clinic"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Nicolin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, 34129 Trieste, Italy
Interests: molecular mechanisms; bone turnover; clinical anatomy
Dr. Claudio Stacchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, 34129 Trieste, Italy
Interests: oral implantology; maxillary sinus floor elevation; bone regeneration
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of non-transfusional hemocomponents represents a novelty in all surgical disciplines and aesthetic medicine. The advantages of their use range from the enhancement of tissue healing to the acceleration of repair processes; from more favorable post-operative courses to a lower incidence of infections. These encouraging results have paved the way for the clinical use of non-transfusional hemocomponents in oral surgery and implantology.

We invite authors to submit basic research and clinical articles about non-transfusional hemocomponents applied to the interconnected fields of oral implantology, periodontology, and oral surgery. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also welcome if they provide new sound scientific evidence in these fields.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Non-transfusional hemocomponents and bone regeneration;
  • Non-transfusional hemocomponents and soft tissue management;
  • Non-transfusional hemocomponents and patient-centered outcomes;
  • New technologies and protocols for the preparation of non-transfusional hemocomponents.

We hope that new ideas will promote a rapid development of these exciting topics, and we invite you to submit your best research activities to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Nicolin
Dr. Claudio Stacchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-transfusional hemocomponents
  • platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)
  • platelet-rich plasma (PRP)
  • plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF)
  • oral surgery
  • oral implantology
  • periodontology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Autologous Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) as an Adjunct in the Management of Osteoradionecrosis and Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws. Case Series in A Single Centre
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 3365; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083365 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 685
Abstract
Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws and medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) are uncommon but serious diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial region with clinically similar appearance but distinct pathophysiology. Management of ORN and MRONJ is inherently challenging and the treatment outcomes are [...] Read more.
Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws and medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) are uncommon but serious diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial region with clinically similar appearance but distinct pathophysiology. Management of ORN and MRONJ is inherently challenging and the treatment outcomes are unpredictable. The use of autologous platelet concentrates (APCs) to promote hard and soft tissue healing is well described in the literature, and the efficacy of leucocyte and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) has been well documented in a number of clinical studies. The aim of this study was to present our treatment strategy and the outcomes of incorporating L-PRF as a surgical adjunct in management of ORN and MRONJ in our centre. Methods: eight cases of ORN and MRONJ were treated with a combination of sequestrectomy and L-PRF as a surgical adjunct. Results: the overall success was 87.5%. Using L-PRF as an adjunct, we were able to predictably manage ORN and MRONJ without causing significant morbidity. Conclusion: our experience shows that L-PRF may be used as a valuable and cost-effective adjunct to surgical management of ORN and MRONJ. However, due to a limited number of patients, and a short period of review, the true effectiveness of the method is yet to be demonstrated in a longer follow-up study including a greater number of patients, besides the inclusion of a control group. Full article
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Article
Effects of Leukocyte-Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L–PRF) on Pain, Soft Tissue Healing, Growth Factors, and Cytokines after Third Molar Extraction: A Randomized, Split-Mouth, Double-Blinded Clinical Trial
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(4), 1666; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041666 - 12 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1347
Abstract
This study assessed the effects of leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L–PRF) on soft tissue healing and the correlation with the local concentration of growth factors (GF) and cytokines in the dental socket of lower third molars. Forty lower-third molars (20 participants) were included in this [...] Read more.
This study assessed the effects of leukocyte-platelet-rich fibrin (L–PRF) on soft tissue healing and the correlation with the local concentration of growth factors (GF) and cytokines in the dental socket of lower third molars. Forty lower-third molars (20 participants) were included in this randomized, double-blinded, split-mouth study. After extractions, randomized sides received alveolar filling with L–PRF on one side and a natural blood clot on the other side. The pain was assessed for up to seven days and soft tissue healing (Landry index) for 14 days post-extraction. Swabs were collected from the surgical sites for GF and cytokine assessment by flow luminometry. Participants reported lower postoperative pain on the sides grafted with L–PRF, which also presented increased tissue healing scores (p < 0.05). There were increased levels of all GFs and several cytokines at the L–PRF site at day one, while vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL–10, and IL1–RA remained higher throughout for seven days (p < 0.05). VEGF concentration at L–PRF sites correlated positively with the participants’ blood platelet content (ρ = 0.769). PDGF correlated negatively with pain experience on days 2 and 3, and positively with soft tissue healing scores, while FGFb presented a weak correlation with a reduction of pain on day 3. The use of L–PRF improves the soft tissue healing process and decreases postoperative pain after the third molar extractions, which correlates with an increase in the local concentration of growth factors such as PDGF and FGFb. Full article
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Article
Role of Autologous Platelet Gel (APG) in Bone Healing: A Rabbit Study
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010395 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 610
Abstract
Purpose: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence and efficacy of autologous platelets on bone regeneration in a rabbit defects model. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 critical size tibial defects were produced in six New Zealand rabbits: [...] Read more.
Purpose: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence and efficacy of autologous platelets on bone regeneration in a rabbit defects model. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 critical size tibial defects were produced in six New Zealand rabbits: A total of six defects were filled with autologous platelet gel (APG) and six defects were maintained as untreated controls. No membranes were used to cover the bone osteotomies. The histology and histomorphometry were performed at four weeks on retrieved samples of both groups. Results: No complications were reported in any of the animals nor for the defects produced. A significantly higher lamellar and woven bone percentage was reported for the APG group with a lower level of marrow spaces (p < 0.05). Evidence of newly formed bone was found in the superficial portion of the bone defect of APG samples where no aspects of bone resorption were observed. Conclusions: The evidence of the present research revealed that APG increases new bone formation restricted to the cortical portion and induces more rapid healing in rabbit bone defects than in untreated defects. Full article
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Article
Concentrated Growth Factors vs. Leukocyte-and-Platelet-Rich Fibrin for Enhancing Postextraction Socket Healing. A Longitudinal Comparative Study
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(22), 8256; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10228256 - 20 Nov 2020
Viewed by 643
Abstract
Platelet concentrates (PCs) have been used for over 20 years in dentistry, as an adjunct to oral surgery procedures, to improve hard and soft tissue healing and control postoperative symptoms. Among various PCs, Leukocyte and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) has become very popular due [...] Read more.
Platelet concentrates (PCs) have been used for over 20 years in dentistry, as an adjunct to oral surgery procedures, to improve hard and soft tissue healing and control postoperative symptoms. Among various PCs, Leukocyte and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) has become very popular due to its excellent cost-effectiveness ratio, and to the simple preparation protocol, but comparative clinical studies with other PCs are lacking. The aim of this split-mouth cohort study was to evaluate the effect of Concentrated Growth Factors (CGF), a recently introduced PC, as compared to L-PRF for enhancing post-extraction socket healing. Methods: Patients in need of bilateral tooth extractions were included. Each side was treated with either CGF or L-PRF. Pain, socket closure and healing index were the main outcomes. Results: Forty-five patients (24 women), aged 60.52 ± 11.75 years (range 37–87 years) were treated. No significant difference in outcomes was found, except for Pain at day 1 (p < 0.001) and socket closure in the vestibulo-palatal/lingual dimension at day 7 post-extraction (p = 0.04), both in favor of CGF. Conclusions: based on the present results, CGF proved to be as effective and safe as L-PRF, representing a valid alternative option for improving alveolar socket healing and reducing postoperative discomfort. Full article
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