Musical Instruments: Acoustics and Vibration II

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 2665

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy
Interests: acoustics; room acoustics; musical acoustics; emulation of nonlinear acoustic systems; 3D auralisation; multiple arrays in 3D acoustic measurements; noise barriers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sound and vibration of musical instruments has gathered great attention among scientists, musicians, and artists since the early knowledge of physics, dating back 2500 years. Several important international institutions and museums are collecting musical instruments and studying their history and origins. However, only a small part of the research deals with the physical characteristics of musical instruments, and an even smaller part deals with the sound emitted from them. This Special Issue (SI) intends to give an opportunity to collect several studies about the acoustics and vibration of musical instruments, both considering classical and ethnic MIs, ranging from measurements to emulations, including physical modelling and virtual musical instruments. This SI is intended for scientists, researchers, and curators that intend to propose a high level of unpublished research, using both theoretical and experimental approaches.

Prof. Dr. Lamberto Tronchin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Musical Instruments
  • Modal Analysis
  • Mobility and Admittance
  • Sound Radiation
  • Physical Modelling

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

10 pages, 851 KiB  
Article
Audio Enhancement of Physical Models of Musical Instruments Using Optimal Correction Factors: The Recorder Case
by Konstantinos Bakogiannis, Spyros Polychronopoulos, Dimitra Marini and Georgios Kouroupetroglou
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(14), 6426; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11146426 - 12 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2074
Abstract
A simulation of a musical instrument is considered to be a successful one when there is a good resemblance between the model’s synthesized sound and the real instrument’s sound. In this work, we propose the integration of physical modeling (PM) methods with an [...] Read more.
A simulation of a musical instrument is considered to be a successful one when there is a good resemblance between the model’s synthesized sound and the real instrument’s sound. In this work, we propose the integration of physical modeling (PM) methods with an optimization process to regulate a generated digital signal. Its goal is to find a new set of values of the PM’s parameters’ that would lead to a synthesized signal matching as much as possible to reference signals corresponding to the physical musical instrument. The reference signals can be: (a) described by their acoustic characteristics (e.g., fundamental frequencies, inharmonicity, etc.) and/or (b) the signals themselves (e.g., impedances, recordings, etc.). We put this method into practice for a commercial recorder, simulated using the digital waveguides’ PM technique. The reference signals, in our case, are the recorded signals of the physical instrument. The degree of similarity between the synthesized (PM) and the recorded signal (musical instrument) is calculated by the signals’ linear cross-correlation. Our results show that the adoption of the optimization process resulted in more realistic synthesized signals by (a) enhancing the degree of similarity between the synthesized and the recorded signal (the average absolute Pearson Correlation Coefficient increased from 0.13 to 0.67), (b) resolving mistuning issues (the average absolute deviation of the synthesized from the recorded signals’ pitches reduced from 40 cents to the non-noticeable level of 2 cents) and (c) similar sound color characteristics and matched overtones (the average absolute deviation of the synthesized from the recorded signals’ first five partials reduced from 41 cents to 2 cents). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Musical Instruments: Acoustics and Vibration II)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop