Seepage Problems in Geotechnical Engineering

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 3 July 2026 | Viewed by 2082

Special Issue Editors

School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
Interests: soil mechanics; in situ tests; soil microstructure
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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071, China
Interests: geotechnical engineering; soil mechanics; special soil
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China
Interests: residual soil; weathered rock; structured clay; mudstone
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As an area of study, seepage mechanics is an important scientific discipline that focuses on the patterns of fluid flow in porous media and covers theoretical, experimental, numerical simulation, and other studies. Since its inception, it has found a wide range of applications in the development of geotechnical engineering, such as in landslides, groundwater, shale gas, geothermal energy, nuclear energy, and other projects. Meanwhile, researchers in the field of seepage mechanics have made great progress in the study of geological hazards, water loss and soil erosion, ground water pollution diffusion, biological–physical–chemical percolation, and other scientific and technological problems. However, this subject is facing new challenges in the fields of non-Darcy, non-Newtonian, nonlinear media, as well as in multi-scale, multi-phase, and multi-field percolation theory and their coupled effects. As a result, seepage problems have become a theoretical and applied foundation for scientific and technical fields of geotechnical engineering. Suggested topics related to this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  1. New progress, opportunities, and challenges of seepage problems;
  2. Seepage mechanics in geotechnical and hydraulic engineering;
  3. Seepages in conventional and unconventional energy;
  4. Seepage mechanics of rock and coal;
  5. Water loss and soil erosion;
  6. Dry shrinkage and cracking of soil;
  7. groundwater pollution percolation and and its countermeasures;
  8. Bioseepage mechanics;
  9. Heat and mass transfer analysis of porous media;
  10. Other fields related to geotechnical seepage.

Dr. Ran An
Prof. Dr. Yixian Wang
Dr. Xianwei Zhang
Dr. Xinyu Liu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • seepage mechanics
  • porous media
  • soil and water conservation
  • groundwater pollution percolation
  • numerical simulation
  • theoretical model

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5815 KiB  
Article
Effect of the Mid-Layer on the Diversion Length and Drainage Performance of a Three-Layer Cover with Capillary Barrier
by Ayşenur Aslan Fidan and Mehmet Muhit Berilgen
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010021 - 19 Dec 2023
Viewed by 681
Abstract
The capillary barrier is a type of soil cover system commonly used in various geotechnical applications, such as limiting infiltration for slopes or landfills or providing cover for solid waste. It serves to prevent the movement of water through the soil layers by [...] Read more.
The capillary barrier is a type of soil cover system commonly used in various geotechnical applications, such as limiting infiltration for slopes or landfills or providing cover for solid waste. It serves to prevent the movement of water through the soil layers by utilizing contrasting particle sizes. This paper focuses on investigating the effect of the granular layer on the performance of a three-layer cover with a capillary barrier, integrating the granular layer within clayey sand. The investigation involved one-dimensional infiltration tests utilizing four uniform granular soils with varying grain sizes. These tests were instrumental in calibrating soil water characteristic curves and hydraulic conductivity curves via back analysis. Subsequently, numerical analyses were conducted using a 15 m long model for each of the four distinct cover types. The results indicated that the fine gravel significantly improved the barrier performance beyond one-dimensional tests, owing to its high permeability and the influence of the slope. After the capillary barrier failure, the intermediate layers transitioned into efficient drainage layers, particularly in the gravel layer with the highest lateral drainage capacity. Clayey sand at the bottom delayed percolation, thereby supporting the conversion of the intermediate layer into an effective drainage component. Overall, the multi-layer system showed superior percolation performance compared to the clayey sand cover lacking a granular layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seepage Problems in Geotechnical Engineering)
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21 pages, 10974 KiB  
Article
Mechanical Response Law and Parameter Influence Analysis of Karst Tunnel Dynamic Excavation
by Gang Han, Penghui Xue, Yanyan Wang, Xian Li, Hanbing Bian, Yixian Wang and Panpan Guo
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(16), 9351; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13169351 - 17 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 682
Abstract
To ensure the stability of the tunnel structure, this paper simulates the excavation process of shield tunneling in karst areas, and monitors the top of the arch, the bottom of the arch and the waist of the arch within the influence of the [...] Read more.
To ensure the stability of the tunnel structure, this paper simulates the excavation process of shield tunneling in karst areas, and monitors the top of the arch, the bottom of the arch and the waist of the arch within the influence of the cave. It obtains the displacement and stress change laws under the influence of the upper cave and the lower cave. Finally, the main factors causing karst collapse in tunnels are explored through orthogonal tests. The results indicate that the displacement of the surrounding rock within the influence of the cave decreases and the stress increases. When the cavity and the tunnel reach the safety limit distance, the effect of the lower cavity on the stress around the tunnel is more obvious than that of the upper cavity. The results of the orthogonal test show that when the cavity is above the tunnel, the tunnel burial depth has the greatest influence on the stability of the surrounding rock; when the cavity is below the tunnel, the cavity height has the greatest influence on the stability of the surrounding rock. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seepage Problems in Geotechnical Engineering)
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