Special Issue "Functional Foods in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wojciech Kolanowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Siedlce University, 08-110 Siedlce, Poland
Interests: healthy diet; human nutrition; functional food; food hygiene
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A healthy diet is one of the basic conditions for a healthy lifestyle. However, to implement a healthy diet, it is necessary to have access to food with high nutritional value, containing significant amounts of health-promoting ingredients with a preventive effect against the rapidly spreading so-called life-style diseases. These include cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, diabetes, cancer, as well as depression, or a generalized decline in immunity increasing susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections. Many natural food ingredients can lower the risk to one’s health, such as polyphelols, omega-3 LC PUFA, vitamins, minerals, and many other bioactive substances of plant and animal origin.

Science and technology go hand in hand in food enhancement, in terms of preserving and enhancing nutritional value and desirable health influence. The most urgent goal seems to be to work on confirming the effect of bioactive substances, which are or can become food ingredients, and which, alone or in synergy with the entire matrix (i.e., a food product), will be able to strengthen the human immune system in fighting diseases and have a positive effect on metabolism. It requires a lot of work and provides an opportunity for interesting and necessary research for scientists in the fields of biology, food technology, medicine, dietetics, animal husbandry, and agronomy. We expect that many interesting papers will be created in this area, the results of which will be disseminated and published in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Wojciech Kolanowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Health-promoting ingredients
  • Bioactive substances
  • Disease prevention
  • Functional food.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Fermented Antler Improves Endurance during Exercise Performance by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Muscle Strength in Mice
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(12), 5386; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11125386 - 10 Jun 2021
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Abstract
In this study, we investigated whether antler fermented with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle strength in vitro and in vivo. LAB from a strain library were grown in antler extract agar at the Yakult Central Research Institute of Korea. [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated whether antler fermented with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle strength in vitro and in vivo. LAB from a strain library were grown in antler extract agar at the Yakult Central Research Institute of Korea. Isolated LAB, named Lactobacillus curvatus HY7602, were used to ferment antlers. Analysis of the effects of fermented antler (FA) revealed that it enhanced the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), signaling pathway and mitochondrial metabolic activity in mouse skeletal myotube (C2C12) cells. Next, we evaluated the effect of non-fermented antler (NFA) and FA on exercise performance in C57BL/6J mice. The results showed that HY7602-FA increased treadmill exercise capacity and forced swimming endurance. Furthermore, blood markers associated with muscle fatigue, endurance, and energy supply (e.g., alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, creatine kinase, and lactate) in the FA-intake group were lower than in the NFA-intake group. In addition, the expression index of genes associated with muscle protein synthesis, and with mitochondrial energy production and supply, in muscle tissue was remarkably higher in the FA group than in the control and NFA groups. Taken together, these results suggested that HY7602-FA may be an effective functional food and health supplement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion)
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Article
Functional Properties of Chlorella vulgaris, Colostrum, and Bifidobacteria, and Their Potential for Application in Functional Foods
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 5264; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11115264 - 06 Jun 2021
Viewed by 385
Abstract
The market for new functional foods and food supplements is rapidly evolving, with a current emphasis on using natural sources. Algae, probiotics, and colostrum are rich sources of nutrients and bioactive compounds with positive effects on human and animal health. To determine the [...] Read more.
The market for new functional foods and food supplements is rapidly evolving, with a current emphasis on using natural sources. Algae, probiotics, and colostrum are rich sources of nutrients and bioactive compounds with positive effects on human and animal health. To determine the potential for developing new functional foods combining these components, we evaluated their synergistic effects. We assessed the growth of selected bifidobacteria in a medium supplemented with Chlorella vulgaris and its immunomodulatory and cytotoxic effects on the human peripheral mononuclear cells and colon cancer cell lines Caco-2 and HT29. The hypocholesterolemic effects of Chlorella powder and bovine colostrum fermented by Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12® on lipid metabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet were also determined. Chlorella addition promoted Bifidobacteria growth, with significantly increased inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) levels following 1.0% (w/v) Chlorella stimulation. Rats fed diets containing fermented colostrum with 0.5% (w/v) added Chlorella powder exhibited significantly decreased triglyceride, very low-density lipoprotein, and alanine and aspartate aminotransferase levels, compared to those of the control group. These results support that C. vulgaris is not cytotoxic in intestinal cell models and affords prebiotic and immunomodulatory effects, as well as synergistic triglyceride-lowering effects with bovine colostrum and B. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion)
Article
Functional Food Product Based on Nanoselenium-Enriched Lactobacillus casei against Cadmium Kidney Toxicity
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 4220; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11094220 - 06 May 2021
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Abstract
This paper demonstrates the ability of a functional food based on probiotics and selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) to annihilate the toxic effect of cadmium on the kidneys. SeNPs were obtained by eco-friendly method used Lactobacillus casei. The morphological features and size of SeNPS [...] Read more.
This paper demonstrates the ability of a functional food based on probiotics and selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) to annihilate the toxic effect of cadmium on the kidneys. SeNPs were obtained by eco-friendly method used Lactobacillus casei. The morphological features and size of SeNPS were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). Two kind of SeNPs were used, purified and Lacto-SeNPs (LSeNPs), administered by gavage at three concentrations (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/Kg b.w.) for 30 days in a mouse model of cadmium renal toxicity. The blood marker of renal injury (creatinine) significantly decreased in groups where the mice were treated with both form of SeNPs. The antioxidant capacity of plasma was evaluated by Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay and revealed that SeNPs in co-treatment with Cd, promotes maintaining antioxidant activity at the control level. Histopathological analysis of kidneys demonstrated morphological alteration in the group that received only cadmium and restored after administration of SeNPs or LSeNPs. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis revealed anti-apoptotic effects through reduction of pro-apoptotic bax and increasing of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expressions. Moreover, co-administration of Cd with SeNPs significantly decreased gene expression of kidneys inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-6, NF-ĸB) in a dose dependent manner, with the best results for LSeNPs at highest dose (0.4 mg/kg). Therefore, the L. casei strain is a potential SeNPs-enriched probiotic for application as functional food in the future to annihilate cadmium-induced kidneys toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion)
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Communication
Salmonids as Natural Functional Food Rich in Omega-3 PUFA
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2409; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052409 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 443
Abstract
Salmonids are valuable fish in the human diet due to their high content of bioactive omega-3 very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC PUFA). The aim of this study was to assess the omega-3 VLC PUFA content in selected salmonid fish present on the [...] Read more.
Salmonids are valuable fish in the human diet due to their high content of bioactive omega-3 very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (VLC PUFA). The aim of this study was to assess the omega-3 VLC PUFA content in selected salmonid fish present on the food market regarding whether they were farm-raised or wild. It was assumed that farm-raised fish, by eating well-balanced feed enriched with omega-3 PUFA, might contain omega-3 VLC PUFA in levels similar to that of wild fish. Fat content, fatty acid composition and omega-3 VLC PUFA content in fish fillets were measured. Farm-raised salmon from Norway, wild Baltic salmon, farm-raised rainbow trout and brown trout were bought from a food market whereas wild trout (rainbow and brown) were caught alive. The fat content in fish ranged from 3.3 to 8.0 g/100 g of fillet. It was confirmed that although wild salmonid fish contain 10–25% more omega-3 VLC PUFA in lipid fraction, the farm-raised ones, due to the 60–100% higher fat content, are an equally rich source of these desirable fatty acids in the human diet. One serving (130 g) of salmonid fish fillets might provide a significant dose of omega-3 VLC PUFA, from 1.2 to 2.5 g. Thus, due to very high content of bioactive fatty acids eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosapentaenoic (DPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) in their meat, salmonid fish currently present on the food market, both sea and freshwater as well as wild and farm-raised, should be considered as natural functional food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion)
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