Special Issue "Functional Foods and Human Health II"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wojciech Kolanowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Siedlce University, 08-110 Siedlce, Poland
Interests: healthy diet; human nutrition; functional food; food hygiene
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, it is becoming very important for people to maintain health and wellness, primarily by strengthening the immune system. This can be achieved by lifestyle changes, including a diet based on foods with a beneficial effect on health. Functional foods are food products that offer health benefits that extend beyond their nutritional value. They may protect against disease, prevent nutrient deficiencies, and promote proper growth and development. Moreover, these benefits should not only be declared, but proven in clinical trials. Although there is no official definition of a functional food, the market of so-called products currently shows the highest growth rate. The concept of functional food originated in Japan in the 1980s when government agencies started approving foods with proven benefits in an effort to better the health of the general population. Functional foods, also known as nutraceuticals, may by enriched with valuable nutrients or other bio-active substances, or the natural products may contain high levels of these (referred to as “super foods”).

Science and technology go hand in hand in the development of new types of functional foods. The most urgent goal seems to be the work on confirming the impact of bio-active substances that are or may become food ingredients, and which alone or in synergistic action with the whole matrix (i.e., the food product) will be able to strengthen the human immune system to fight pathogens and cancer and beneficially influence metabolism. This is important for every individual, as well as for public health. It requires a great deal of work and presents an opportunity for interesting and necessary research for scientists in the fields of biology, food technology, medicine, dietetics, and animal husbandry and agronomy. We expect that many interesting works will be created in this respect, the results of which will be disseminated and published in this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Wojciech Kolanowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • functional food
  • nutraceuticals
  • health
  • bio-active substances
  • antioxidants
  • immune system
  • superfood

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Yellow Tea Leaves Camellia sinensis on the Quality of Stored Chocolate Confectionery
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 4123; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11094123 - 30 Apr 2021
Viewed by 340
Abstract
Chocolate and tea leaves are considered the most valuable sources of highly bioactive polyphenols due to their potential anti-cancer properties and beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The objective of the present study was the development of a sensory profiling modality [...] Read more.
Chocolate and tea leaves are considered the most valuable sources of highly bioactive polyphenols due to their potential anti-cancer properties and beneficial effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The objective of the present study was the development of a sensory profiling modality that is correlated with the taste of the chocolate enriched with yellow tea phytochemicals. The additive concentration was optimized in white chocolate and the designed product was evaluated using the sensory profiling method. It was shown that the yellow tea extract in chocolate had a significant effect on the taste and color of the product. Addition of 2.0% yellow tea powdered extract increased the value of color acceptance and caused an intensification of the aromas, particularly the leafy taste, compared to the control samples. The next step of the study was to determine the influence of tea addition in white, milk and dark chocolate subjected to 6 months of storage. The designed chocolates were tested for their activity as antioxidants (DPPH, ABTS and ORAC assay) and cholinesterase inhibitors (AChE, BChE assay). It was confirmed that the yellow tea addition affected the activity of prepared chocolates with respect to radical scavenging activity and was highest for dark chocolate with yellow tea where the values were as follows: 4373 mg Tx/100 g (DPPH), 386 mg Tx/100 g (ABTS) and 4363 µM Tx/100 g (ORAC). An increase in the anti-radical activity of chocolate with yellow tea was found after 3 months of storage, but the subsequent 3 months of storage resulted in its reduction. AChE values ranged from 0.118 to 0.730 [µM eserine/g dw] and from 0.095 to 0.480 [µM eserine/g dw] for BChE assay. Total capacity to inhibit AChE and BChE differed depending on the type of chocolate and was negatively influenced by the half-year storage. Summarizing tested values for individual samples were higher, with increasing content of cocoa liquor and yellow tea extract in the product. The results of the research show that the use of yellow tea in confectionery is promising and may appoint a new direction in functional foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods and Human Health II)
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Article
Postharvest UV-B and Photoperiod with Blue + Red LEDs as Strategies to Stimulate Carotenogenesis in Bell Peppers
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(9), 3736; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11093736 - 21 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 525
Abstract
Background: Our objective was to evaluate carotenoid accumulation in bell peppers during shelf life under different light conditions. Methods: Fruit stored for 6 d at 7 °C received a 9 kJ m−2 UV-B treatment, while non-UV-treated were used as control (CTRL). Subsequently, [...] Read more.
Background: Our objective was to evaluate carotenoid accumulation in bell peppers during shelf life under different light conditions. Methods: Fruit stored for 6 d at 7 °C received a 9 kJ m−2 UV-B treatment, while non-UV-treated were used as control (CTRL). Subsequently, all peppers were disposed for a retail sale period of 4 d at 20 °C with a photoperiod of 14 h under fluorescent light (FL) + 10 h under darkness (D), FL, or blue + red LEDs (BR LED). Results: Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was increased by the UV-B treatment and the photoperiods supplemented with FL and BR LED, which was directly related to the carotenoid content. In fact, CTRL peppers (225 mg β-carotene kg−1) under FL+BR LED showed an increase of ~33% of 13-cis-β-carotene, ~24% of all-trans-β-carotene, and ~27.5% of 9-cis-β-carotene compared to FL + D and FL + FL. Capsaicinoids showed an increase by ~22%, ~38%, and ~27% in the content of capsanthin, capsanthin laurate, and capsanthin esters, respectively, after the UV-B treatment, which was even enhanced after the LED-supplemented photoperiod by ~18% compared to FL+D. Conclusions: Illumination with BR LEDs + UV-B during the retail sale period nights is recommended to increase the bioactive content of bell peppers via carotenoid accumulation to 270 mg β-carotene kg−1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods and Human Health II)
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