Special Issue "Exploration and Sustainable Management of Groundwater Resources in Geologically Complex Terrain"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Earth Sciences and Geography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Shih-Meng Hsu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No.2, Beining Rd., Jhongjheng District, Keelung City 202, Taiwan
Interests: groundwater exploration in hard rock aquifers; applied hydrogeology; gohazard investigation and assessment; statistical analysis of hydrogeological data; disaster prevention education
Prof. Dr. Cheng-Haw Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Resources Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan, 70101, Taiwan.
Interests: groundwater flow; fracture hydrogeology; groundwater resources; hydraulic tomography; subsurface hydrology; contaminant transport modeling
Prof. Dr. Liang-Cheng Chang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
Interests: groundwater system characterization and modeling; sustainable groundwater management;· conjunctive use of surface and subsurface water; data-driven analysis of groundwater systems; micromodel study of multiphase flows

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Groundwater is a precious and limited resource. Due to overexploitation and pollution, the available groundwater resources are declining globally. In addition, climate change poses unavoidable uncertainties to the supply and management of groundwater resources. Such influences drastically disrupt sustainable groundwater development. For sustainable use of groundwater resources, we must explore new groundwater resources from unexploited sites (e.g., groundwater abstraction from fractured bedrock aquifers) and promote advanced groundwater management. This will require more precise information on groundwater quantity and quality. Two primary obstacles for obtaining this goal are the characterization of aquifer systems and the identification of emerging groundwater resources. Particularly, if potential or contaminated groundwater occurs in complex geologic environments, these investigations become challenging. Advanced techniques (for example, single well or cross-borehole hydraulic tests, geophysical approaches, hydrogeophysical techniques, geochemistry and isotopes, remote sensing and GIS, numerical models, integrated interdisciplinary methods, etc.) and adaptive management strategies should be developed and proposed for sustainable use of groundwater resources.

This Special Issue welcomes original research papers and reviews focusing on recent advances and novelties in the field, as well as modeling approaches in groundwater investigation and management. Multidisciplinary investigations are strongly encouraged. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Groundwater exploration in geologically complex terrain;
  • Emerging technologies for groundwater investigation, monitoring, and numerical modeling;
  • Climate change impact on groundwater resources;
  • Innovative methods for subsurface characterization and modeling;
  • Advanced approaches for improved understanding of subsurface processes;
  • Sustainability and adaptive management of groundwater resources.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Shih-Meng Hsu
Prof. Dr. Cheng-Haw Lee
Prof. Dr. Liang-Cheng Chang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • groundwater exploration
  • sustainable groundwater management
  • climate change impacts on groundwater resources
  • hydrogeological investigation techniques
  • Groundwater modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Integrating In-Situ Data and RS-GIS Techniques to Identify Groundwater Potential Sites in Mountainous Regions of Taiwan
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 4119; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124119 - 15 Jun 2020
Abstract
Due to rapid urbanization, the development of megacities and metropolises worldwide is creating water scarcity, social-environmental risk, and challenges to the regions where water supply from rivers and alluvial aquifers is insufficient and unstable. Groundwater exploration in fractured bedrock of mountainous regions is [...] Read more.
Due to rapid urbanization, the development of megacities and metropolises worldwide is creating water scarcity, social-environmental risk, and challenges to the regions where water supply from rivers and alluvial aquifers is insufficient and unstable. Groundwater exploration in fractured bedrock of mountainous regions is thus a crucial issue in the search for substitute water resources. To achieve cost effectiveness on groundwater exploration, the use of comprehensive remote sensing (RS)- and geographic information system (GIS)-based models appears feasible. The required parameters selected and analyzed from the literature depend on the hydrogeological characteristics. This study intends to investigate and improve the proposed parameters and data sources upon those presented in the literature. A total of 17 hydrogeological units of concern was delineated from 105 complex geological formations of the geological sections and main rock types. The other parameters related to groundwater potential were derived from the digital elevation model and Landsat imagery. In addition, 118 drilling cores were inspected and in-situ well yield data from 72 wells were employed to assess the normalized groundwater potential index in the raster-based empirical GIS model with a higher spatial resolution. The results show that the accuracy of the interpretation of groundwater potential sites improved from 48.6% to 84.7%. The three-dimensional (3D) visualization of a thematic map integrated with satellite imagery is useful as a cost-effective approach for assessing groundwater potential. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Groundwater Level Fluctuation Analysis in a Semi-Urban Area Using Statistical Methods and Data Mining Techniques—A Case Study in Wrocław, Poland
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3553; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103553 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Long-term groundwater level analysis, which is usually based on traditionally defined hydrological years is essential in an era of global warming and other climatic and environmental changes, especially in urban areas. A complex interplay of multiple factors influencing the groundwater level makes the [...] Read more.
Long-term groundwater level analysis, which is usually based on traditionally defined hydrological years is essential in an era of global warming and other climatic and environmental changes, especially in urban areas. A complex interplay of multiple factors influencing the groundwater level makes the investigation of their interdependencies a challenge. Based on multiple data sets and a long time series available as well as specific geological and hydrological conditions, a semi-urban district of Wrocław/Poland was selected as a case study for investigating these dependencies. This paper presents an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of groundwater level fluctuations by combining mathematics, signal processing, hydrogeology, and meteorology. Applying well-known methods from disciplines other than hydrogeology, the authors investigated seasonal behavior and similarity of groundwater level fluctuations during 15 hydrological years. Based on segmentation and agglomerative clustering (AHP), five classes of groundwater levels fluctuations for predefined hydrologic years and the corresponding seasons were identified and compared to the classification scheme by Pleczyński. Additionally, the relationship between precipitation and groundwater level was investigated using Pearson, Kendall and Spearman correlations. This led to the identification of “typical” and “untypical” seasons for the correlation between the cumulative precipitation sum and groundwater levels. The results presented here will be used for further investigations of groundwater level fluctuations using additional factors and statistical methods. These aim to identify periods that describe similarities better than the commonly used hydrological year. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigation on the Efficiency of Subsurface Drainage for Large-Scale Landslides
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3346; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103346 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
This paper presents a field monitoring study with emphasis on the design and construction of a subsurface drainage system and evaluation of its stabilization efficiency on the slope of You-Ye-Lin landslide using a three-dimensional finite element method program (Plaxis 3D) for the groundwater [...] Read more.
This paper presents a field monitoring study with emphasis on the design and construction of a subsurface drainage system and evaluation of its stabilization efficiency on the slope of You-Ye-Lin landslide using a three-dimensional finite element method program (Plaxis 3D) for the groundwater flow and slope stability analyses. The subsurface drainage system consists of two 4-m diameter drainage wells with multi-level horizontal drains and was installed to draw down the groundwater level and stabilize the unstable slope of the landslide. Results demonstrate that the subsurface drainage system is functional and capable of accelerating the drainage of the infiltrated rainwater during torrential rainfalls during the typhoon season. The large groundwater drawdown by the subsurface drainage system protects the slopes from further deterioration and maintains the slope stability at an acceptable and satisfactory level. Full article
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