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Fatigue Damage of Additively Manufactured Parts

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2019) | Viewed by 11274

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Chair of Materials Test Engineering (WPT), TU Dortmund University, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
Interests: materials science and engineering; high-resolution microstructure and defect analysis; fatigue behavior with temperature and corrosion superposition; metrological material condition monitoring; fracture mechanics evaluation of damage tolerances; process-structure-property-damage interactions; mechanism-based material modeling and simulation
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Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department, The University of Lahore, Lahore 54890, Pakistan
Interests: additive manufacturing; microstructure; mechanical behavior; fatigue damage; very high cycle fatigue (VHCF); hybrid manufacturing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The design freedom, customization potential, and significant reduction in product development cycle brings additive manufacturing (AM) to the forefront of the fourth industrial revolution. It has developed in the last few years to a level where it results now in mechanically-sound structures. The potential of light-weighting, functional enhancement by design and/or selective material compaction, functional grading as well as development of new alloys specific for additive manufacturing are topics of current interest. The application of the technology to functional components subjected to fatigue loading still needs careful design with respect to the available material data. This Special Issue is focused on scientific contributions to serve as a compendium of research currently available on fatigue of AM parts. Papers are open for all material classes and AM processes. Studies covering the following or associated topics are welcome:

  • Influence of AM-specific microstructure on fatigue behavior
  • Role of remnant porosity in fatigue strength
  • Fracture behavior as compared to conventional alloys
  • Influence of orientation on fatigue and fracture
  • Role of texture in fatigue determination
  • Fatigue of multi-material structures
  • Fatigue of hybrid-processed structures
  • Functional grading for fatigue
  • Fatigue modeling of AM parts
  • Prediction of fatigue life in AM parts
  • Low, high and very high cycle fatigue (LCF/HCF/VHCF) behavior

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Frank Walther
Dr. Abilio M. P. de Jesus
Dr.-Ing. Shafaqat Siddique
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • additive manufacturing
  • fatigue
  • LCF
  • HCF
  • VHCF
  • microstructure
  • porosity,
  • functional grading
  • fatigue life prediction
  • hybrid structures

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2469 KiB  
Article
VHCF Response up to 109 Cycles of SLM AlSi10Mg Specimens Built in a Vertical Direction
by Davide S. Paolino, Andrea Tridello, Jacopo Fiocchi, Carlo A. Biffi, Giorgio Chiandussi, Massimo Rossetto and Ausonio Tuissi
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(15), 2954; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9152954 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2804
Abstract
It is well-known that many manufacturing parameters affect the quasi-static and the fatigue response of additive manufacturing (AM) parts. In particular, due to the layer-by-layer production, the load orientation, with respect to the building direction, plays a fundamental role for the fatigue response. [...] Read more.
It is well-known that many manufacturing parameters affect the quasi-static and the fatigue response of additive manufacturing (AM) parts. In particular, due to the layer-by-layer production, the load orientation, with respect to the building direction, plays a fundamental role for the fatigue response. This paper investigates the fatigue response up to 109 cycles (very high cycle fatigue (VHCF)) of selective laser melting (SLM) AlSi10Mg specimens built in a vertical direction. Ultrasonic tension-compression tests (stress ratio of –1) are carried out on as-built Gaussian specimens with a large loaded volume (2300 mm3). Fracture surfaces are investigated with the scanning electron microscope to analyze the defects originating the VHCF failure. Probabilistic S-N curves are estimated and analyzed. Experimental results confirm that the defect size controls the VHCF response, thus highlighting the importance of testing large risk volumes for a reliable assessment of VHCF behavior. The average value of the VHCF strength is close to that of the hourglass specimen tested in the literature. The variability of the VHCF strength is instead significantly larger, due to the scattered size distribution of the defects located near the specimen surface, which is the most critical region for crack initiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage of Additively Manufactured Parts)
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20 pages, 11112 KiB  
Article
Determination of Influencing Factors on Interface Strength of Additively Manufactured Multi-Material Parts by Material Extrusion
by Raphael Freund, Hagen Watschke, Julius Heubach and Thomas Vietor
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(9), 1782; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9091782 - 29 Apr 2019
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 4569
Abstract
Material composition complexity offered by material extrusion additive manufacturing offers new opportunities for function-driven part design. Nevertheless, since influencing factors on the interface strength between different materials are not well understood, this complexity is only used infrequently, in part, in design thereby restraining [...] Read more.
Material composition complexity offered by material extrusion additive manufacturing offers new opportunities for function-driven part design. Nevertheless, since influencing factors on the interface strength between different materials are not well understood, this complexity is only used infrequently, in part, in design thereby restraining innovation. This paper proposes a systematical approach for identification and quantification of relevant adhesion phenomena that influence interface strength. For this reason, suited test specimen, which utilize the geometric freedom offered by additive manufacturing, are developed for roll peeling tests and peeling resistance of several combinations of rigid and flexible materials is determined. The results show that material choice especially regarding polarity as well as mechanical interlocking in regards to surface roughness and design features have high influence on the interface strength of multi-material parts manufactured by material extrusion. These results are explained through the relevant adhesion mechanisms that determine the interface strength in additively manufactured parts. Finally, criteria that predominantly affect interface strength are deduced and design recommendations for creating functional parts with ill-fitting material combinations are formulated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage of Additively Manufactured Parts)
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18 pages, 4508 KiB  
Article
Simulation of Cyclic Deformation Behavior of Selective Laser Melted and Hybrid-Manufactured Aluminum Alloys Using the Phase-Field Method
by Shafaqat Siddique, Mustafa Awd, Tillmann Wiegold, Sandra Klinge and Frank Walther
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1948; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101948 - 16 Oct 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3194
Abstract
Selective laser melting process has already been developed for many metallic materials, including steel, aluminum, and titanium. The quasistatic properties of these materials have been found to be comparable or even better than their conventionally-manufactured counterparts; however, for their reliable applications in operational [...] Read more.
Selective laser melting process has already been developed for many metallic materials, including steel, aluminum, and titanium. The quasistatic properties of these materials have been found to be comparable or even better than their conventionally-manufactured counterparts; however, for their reliable applications in operational components, their fatigue behavior plays a critical role, which is dominated by several process-related features, like surface roughness, remnant porosity, microstructure, and residual stresses, which are controlled by the processing features, like imparted energy density to the material, its corresponding solidification behavior, the cooling rate in the process, as well as post-processing treatments. This study investigates the influence of these parameters on the cyclic deformation behavior of selective laser melted as well as hybrid-manufactured aluminum alloys. The corresponding microstructural features and porosity conditions are evaluated for developing correlations between the process conditions to microstructure, the deformation behavior, and the corresponding fatigue lives. From the numerical point of view, damage development with respect to process-induced cyclic deformation behavior is assessed by the phase-field method, which has been identified as an appropriate method for the determination of fatigue life at the respective applied stress levels. Fatigue strength of SLM-processed parts is found better than their cast counterparts, while hybridization has further increased fatigue strength. No effect of test frequency on the fatigue life could be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fatigue Damage of Additively Manufactured Parts)
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