Special Issue "Diagnostic Methodology and Sensors Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2022 | Viewed by 2948

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mario De Cesare
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Diagnostic Methodologies and Measurement Techniques, Italian Aerospace Research Centre, 81043 Capua, Italy
2. Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 81100 Caserta, Italy
3. Section of Naples, National Institute for Nuclear Physics, 00186 Roma, Italy
Interests: infrared, spectroscopic and nuclear methodology; gamma detection technologies; accelerator mass spectrometry of actinides; plasma wind tunnel for re-entry phase; calibration and verification techniques; thermal protection system characterization; plasma characterization; sustainability and environment monitoring; natural and anthropogenic radionuclides; airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy
Prof. Dr. Marilena Musto
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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; CFD simulation; mechanical engineering; numerical analysis; energy; heat exchangers; numerical simulation; thermal engineering; engineering thermodynamics; modeling and simulation
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Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Rotondo
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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Prof. Dr. Umberto Galietti
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Guest Editor
Politecn Bari, Department of Mech Math & Management DMMM, I-70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: non-destructive techniques; fatigue strength study by means of thermal methods; fracture mechanics behavior of material
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Applications and sensors derived from applied physics and engineering research in avant-garde environments such as aerospace have produced more and more uses for  safeguarding from Space access and return to Earth Observation and Environmental monitoring. However, it is necessary to minimize the gap between predicted and experimental results, and the community now faces new challenges in innovative methodologies, measurement, and uncertainty assessment.

Our ambition in releasing this Special issue is to ensure the rapid dissemination of up-to-date theoretical and research results from a very broad spectrum of topics, including measurement and sensors for aerospace applications, and information harvesting in the field of human safety like Earth Observation and Environmental monitoring. Therefore, papers should also present measurement methods, approaches, and principles for performance assessment through measurement, verification protocols, testing, and validation methods. Interdisciplinary contributions crossing boundaries within methodologies and measurements are especially welcome in the form of research papers, communications, review papers, and letters. There are multiple interconnections between apparently different research environments, and our goal is to combine the best research and technology in one Issue to ensure the safety and protection of humanity and the surrounding environment.

Prof. Dr. Mario De Cesare
Prof. Dr. Marilena Musto
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Rotondo
Prof. Dr. Umberto Galietti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Radiative Parameters
  • Radiative Sensors
  • Nuclear Sensors
  • Linear Accelerator
  • Mass Spectrometry
  • Test Facility
  • Heat Flux
  • Calibration and Verification Techniques
  • Thermal Protection System Properties
  • Plasma Proprieties
  • Sustainability and Environment Monitoring
  • Anthropogenic Characterization and Observation
  • Observation Technologies for Human Safety
  • Airborne Technologies
  • Radiation Hardness

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Noise Analysis in Pre-Amplifier Circuits Associated to Highly Sensitive Optically-Pumped Magnetometers for Geomagnetic Applications
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(20), 7172; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10207172 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 864
Abstract
This paper analyzes the noise sources in photoelectric detection circuits with several low-noise operational amplifiers cores. The fabricated circuits are low-noise pre-amplifiers that are used for optically pumped magnetometers. In the proposed circuits, the noise levels of equivalent output voltage are calculated, and [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes the noise sources in photoelectric detection circuits with several low-noise operational amplifiers cores. The fabricated circuits are low-noise pre-amplifiers that are used for optically pumped magnetometers. In the proposed circuits, the noise levels of equivalent output voltage are calculated, and the results are in accordance with measurements. With a cooperation of several operational amplifiers, we select LT1028 from linear technologies as the core for our detection circuit, which has an output signal-to-noise ratio of more than 2 × 105 up to the frequency of 100 kHz. By analyzing the individual noise sources in the detection circuit, the dominant noise source is confirmed as the photocurrent shot noise below 200 kHz. Beyond this frequency, the voltage noise source in the operational amplifier dominates. Besides, the lamp power, the radio frequency (RF) power, the temperature variations, and their influences on the sensitivity are studied and optimized. Finally, an optically pumped magnetometer with cesium head is established, showing an intrinsic sensitivity of 85 fT/√Hz. This sensitivity is realized under a geomagnetic magnetic field strength of 53 μT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic Methodology and Sensors Technologies)
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Article
A Fast-Response Calorimeter with Dynamic Corrections for Transient Heat Transfer Measurements
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 6143; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10176143 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 911
Abstract
Robust fast-response transient calorimeters with novel calorimeter elements have attracted the attention of researchers as new synthetic materials have been developed. This sensor uses diamonds as the calorimeter element, and a platinum film resistance is sputtered on the back to measure the temperature. [...] Read more.
Robust fast-response transient calorimeters with novel calorimeter elements have attracted the attention of researchers as new synthetic materials have been developed. This sensor uses diamonds as the calorimeter element, and a platinum film resistance is sputtered on the back to measure the temperature. The surface heat flux is obtained based on the calorimetric principle. The sensor has the advantages of high sensitivity and not being prone to erosion. However, non-ideal conditions, such as heat dissipation from the calorimeter element to the surroundings, can lead to measurement deviation and result in challenges for sensor miniaturization. In this study, a novel transient calorimeter (NTC) with two different sizes was developed using air or epoxy as the back-filling material. Numerical simulations were conducted to explain the complex heat exchange between the calorimeter element and its surroundings, which showed that it deviated from the assumption of an ideal calorimeter sensor. Accordingly, a dynamic correction method was proposed to compensate for the energy loss from the backside of the calorimeter element. The numerical results showed that the dynamic correction method significantly improved the measurement deviation, and the relative error was within 2.3% if the test time was smaller than 12 ms in the simulated cases. Detonation shock tunnel experiments confirmed the results of the dynamic correction method and demonstrated a practical method to obtain the dynamic correction coefficient. The accuracy and feasibility of the dynamic correction method were verified in a single detonation shock tunnel and under shock tube conditions. The NTC calorimeter exhibited good repeatability in all experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic Methodology and Sensors Technologies)
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Review

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Review
Advances in Material Wide Range Temperature Determination by Dual-Color Emissivity Free Methodology in Long-Mid-near Infrared Ranges and Non-stationary Aerospace Re-Entry Conditions
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(4), 1385; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11041385 - 03 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 735
Abstract
Dual color emissivity free methodology by thermography allows to obtain 2D (two-dimensional) temperature maps by using local grey body hypotheses and narrowband filters. By using a suitable pair of filters is possible to obtain the ratio between two thermal camera input signals that [...] Read more.
Dual color emissivity free methodology by thermography allows to obtain 2D (two-dimensional) temperature maps by using local grey body hypotheses and narrowband filters. By using a suitable pair of filters is possible to obtain the ratio between two thermal camera input signals that depend only on the temperature and not on the emissive properties of the investigated surface. The aim of this concise review paper is to summarize and discuss the developments and applications from long- to mid-near infrared ranges and in a wide range of temperature values of the dual-color thermographic technique that has been analysed through the use of an analytical model based on the integration of Planck’s law and attenuated with the transmission curves of sensors, optics, filters, and attenuators during the last years. Moreover, the applicability to the non-stationary temperature conditions and finalized to the materials mainly used in the aerospace plasma wind tunnel (PWT) re-entry are shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic Methodology and Sensors Technologies)
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