applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

New Advances in Anaerobic Fermentation for Biogas and Biomethane Production

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 23681

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy
Interests: microbial processes; biofuels; microbial ecology and biogeochemical cycles; environmental impact; near infrared spectroscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: fermentations; biotransformations; applied biocatalysis; near-infrared spectroscopy; energy from biomass; enzymatic reactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biological degradation of the organic matrix under anaerobic conditions determines the formation of different products through simultaneous reactions in which the compounds pass into different oxidation states until they are converted into methane, carbon dioxide and other by-products. The process is carried out by a bacterial consortium and includes a series of biodegradative reactions, the slowest of which, methanogenesis, is the step limiting the process. Each population has a well-defined role in demolition by producing reaction intermediates as catabolites that act as a substrate for the next population in the trophic chain. The microbial consortium includes hydrolytic bacteria, acidifying bacteria (acetogenic and homoacetogenic) and methanogenic bacteria.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight advances in biogas production. Currently, a rapidly growing concern for environmental sustainability is represented by the use of food waste as a substitute for dedicated crops for biogas production. Another very important aspect concerns the condition of the fermentations used and their optimization. Lastly, since it is a process that generates by-products, work concerned with upgrading processes is vital and can be included in this Special Issue.

Dr. Elena Tamburini
Dr. Stefania Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biogas production
  • anaerobic fermentation
  • upgrading processes
  • biomethane production

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 608 KiB  
Article
Bio-Delignification of Green Waste (GW) in Co-Digestion with the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) to Enhance Biogas Production
by Bruno Semeraro, Daniela Summa, Stefania Costa, Federico Zappaterra and Elena Tamburini
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(13), 6061; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11136061 - 29 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1911
Abstract
The organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is recognized as a suitable substrate for the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and is currently considered a mature technology. A promising strategy to enhance biogas yield and productivity is the co-digestion of OFMSW with other [...] Read more.
The organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is recognized as a suitable substrate for the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and is currently considered a mature technology. A promising strategy to enhance biogas yield and productivity is the co-digestion of OFMSW with other organic biomass, such as green waste (GW), a mixture of leaves, grass, and woody materials originated from private yards and public greenspace management. The main limitation to the use of GW for biogas production is the high percentage of the lignocellulosic fraction, which makes necessary a pretreatment of delignification to dissolve the recalcitrant structure. In this study, a new strategy of sustainable bio-delignification using the white-rot fungi Bjerkandera adusta (BA) in comparison with other chemical pretreatments were investigated. Untreated and treated GW were, respectively, submitted to anaerobic co-digestion with OFMSW. AD processes were carried out in a lab-scale plant for 30 days in thermophilic conditions (55 °C). Biogas cumulative production was increased by about 100% in the case of treated GW compared with that of just OFMSW, from 145 to 289 Nm3 CH4/ton SV, and productivity almost doubled from 145 to 283 Nm3/ton FM * day. The measured average methane content values in the cumulative biogas were 55% from OFMSW and 54% from GW. Moreover, over 95% of the biogas was produced in 20 days, showing the potential opportunity to reduce the AD time. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2038 KiB  
Article
Diauxie Studies in Biogas Production from Gelatin and Adaptation of the Modified Gompertz Model: Two-Phase Gompertz Model
by Carolina Scaraffuni Gomes, Martin Strangfeld and Michael Meyer
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1067; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031067 - 25 Jan 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 2709
Abstract
The anaerobic degradation of gelatin results in a two-phase cumulative biogas production curve, i.e., diauxie behaviour. The modified Gompertz model is normally used to fit these curves but due to the diauxie it would result in a less accurate representation. Furthermore, this inhibition [...] Read more.
The anaerobic degradation of gelatin results in a two-phase cumulative biogas production curve, i.e., diauxie behaviour. The modified Gompertz model is normally used to fit these curves but due to the diauxie it would result in a less accurate representation. Furthermore, this inhibition slows down the production of biogas in batch reactors. This study adapted the modified Gompertz model to fit cumulative biogas production curves with diauxie behaviour and to investigate the inhibition that leads to this diauxie. Results show that the two-phase Gompertz model can fit diauxie curves with high accuracy and that diauxie curves are not a direct consequence of the accumulation of volatile fatty acids produced in the process of anaerobic digestion. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1607 KiB  
Article
Biomethane Potential of Sludges from a Brackish Water Fish Hatchery
by Francesco da Borso, Alessandro Chiumenti, Giulio Fait, Matia Mainardis and Daniele Goi
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(2), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11020552 - 8 Jan 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2186
Abstract
The development of intensive aquaculture is facing the challenge of the sustainable management of effluents. The reproductive sectors (i.e., hatcheries) mainly use water recirculation systems (RAS), which discharge a portion of wastewater. Anaerobic digestion (AD) could reduce the environmental impact of this waste [...] Read more.
The development of intensive aquaculture is facing the challenge of the sustainable management of effluents. The reproductive sectors (i.e., hatcheries) mainly use water recirculation systems (RAS), which discharge a portion of wastewater. Anaerobic digestion (AD) could reduce the environmental impact of this waste stream while producing biogas. The study is focused on the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of brackish fish hatchery sludges. Wastewater was concentrated by microfiltration and sedimentation and thickened sludges were treated in a BMP system with different inoculum/substrate (I/S) volatile solids ratios (from 50:1 to no inoculum). The highest I/S ratio showed the highest BMP (564.2 NmL CH4/g VS), while different I/S ratios showed a decreasing trend (319.4 and 127.7 NmL CH4/g VS, for I/S = 30 and I/S = 3). In absence of inoculum BMP resulted of 62.2 NmL CH4/g VS. The kinetic analysis (modified Gompertz model) showed a good correlation with the experimental data, but with a long lag-phase duration (from 14.0 to 5.5 days) in particular with the highest I/S. AD applied to brackish water sludges can be a promising treatment with interesting methane productions. For a continuous, full-scale application further investigation on biomass adaptation to salinity and on retention times is needed. Further experimental tests are ongoing. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

27 pages, 2025 KiB  
Review
Biogas Plants in Renewable Energy Systems—A Systematic Review of Modeling Approaches of Biogas Production
by Mathias Heiker, Matthias Kraume, Anica Mertins, Tim Wawer and Sandra Rosenberger
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 3361; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083361 - 8 Apr 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 11311
Abstract
Biogas production is a relevant component in renewable energy systems. The paper addresses modeling approaches from an energy system, as well as from a process optimization, point of view. Model approaches of biogas production show different levels of detail. They can be classified [...] Read more.
Biogas production is a relevant component in renewable energy systems. The paper addresses modeling approaches from an energy system, as well as from a process optimization, point of view. Model approaches of biogas production show different levels of detail. They can be classified as white, gray, and black box, or bottom-up and top-down approaches. On the one hand, biogas modeling can supply dynamic information on the anaerobic digestion process, e.g., to predict biogas yields or to optimize the anaerobic digestion process. These models are characterized by a bottom-up approach with different levels of detail: the comprehensive ADM1 (white box), simplifications and abstractions of AD models (gray box), or highly simplified process descriptions (black box). On the other hand, biogas production is included in energy system models. These models usually supply aggregated information on regional biogas potentials and greenhouse gas emissions. They are characterized by a top-down approach with a low level of detail. Most energy system models reported in literature are based on black box approaches. Considering the strengths and weaknesses of the integration of detailed and deeply investigated process models in energy system models reveals the opportunity to develop dynamic and fluctuating business models of biogas usage. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 2609 KiB  
Review
Halophyte Plants and Their Residues as Feedstock for Biogas Production—Chances and Challenges
by Ariel E. Turcios, Aadila Cayenne, Hinrich Uellendahl and Jutta Papenbrock
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 2746; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11062746 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4609
Abstract
The importance of green technologies is steadily growing. Salt-tolerant plants have been proposed as energy crops for cultivation on saline lands. Halophytes such as Salicornia europaea, Tripolium pannonicum, Crithmum maritimum and Chenopodium quinoa, among many other species, can be cultivated [...] Read more.
The importance of green technologies is steadily growing. Salt-tolerant plants have been proposed as energy crops for cultivation on saline lands. Halophytes such as Salicornia europaea, Tripolium pannonicum, Crithmum maritimum and Chenopodium quinoa, among many other species, can be cultivated in saline lands, in coastal areas or for treating saline wastewater, and the biomass might be used for biogas production as an integrated process of biorefining. However, halophytes have different salt tolerance mechanisms, including compartmentalization of salt in the vacuole, leading to an increase of sodium in the plant tissues. The sodium content of halophytes may have an adverse effect on the anaerobic digestion process, which needs adjustments to achieve stable and efficient conversion of the halophytes into biogas. This review gives an overview of the specificities of halophytes that needs to be accounted for using their biomass as feedstocks for biogas plants in order to expand renewable energy production. First, the different physiological mechanisms of halophytes to grow under saline conditions are described, which lead to the characteristic composition of the halophyte biomass, which may influence the biogas production. Next, possible mechanisms to avoid negative effects on the anaerobic digestion process are described, with an overview of full-scale applications. Taking all these aspects into account, halophyte plants have a great potential for biogas and methane production with yields similar to those produced by other energy crops and the simultaneous benefit of utilization of saline soils. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop