applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Microgrid and Smart Grid: Latest Advances and Prospects

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 3499

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Information Science and Technology, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051, China
Interests: microgrids; renewable energy; power electronics; MATLAB simulation; power converters
Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: wind power and power systems; power electronics; microgrids; HVDC

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. “One Thousand Experts Plan”, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
2. Faculty of Electric and Electronics Engineering, Holon Institute of Technology, Holon 5810201, Israel
Interests: energy conversion; power electronics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Research on Microgrids, AAU Energy, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Interests: microgrids; space power systems; psychobiology; brain networks
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Engineering, Information Technology and Physical Sciences, Federation University Australia, Mount Helen, VIC 3353, Australia
Interests: sustainable energy systems & power electronics (wind turbine systems, solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, grid integration of renewable energy sources); microgrids & smart grid technologies; electric drives & electric vehicle technologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting submissions to the Special Issue on “Microgrid and Smart Grid: Latest Advances and Prospects”.

Nowadays, the smart grid has been one of the key technologies used in solving energy and environmental problems. Microgrids are active components and the main control entities of smart grids. Their use is an important way to realize autonomous self-healing, interaction between supply and demand, and the marketability of distribution systems in the future. To regulate microgrids, which is a complex network system, the hierarchical control method is commonly used. The structure of hierarchical control can be divided into the bottom physical layer, the middle information layer, and the top service layer. It can also be divided into the primary control for the stability control of the local system, the secondary control for the frequency/voltage recovery, and the tertiary control for the power flow scheduling optimization after grid connection. Due to the existence of heterogeneous renewable energy sources, online optimization and real-time power balance control should be taken into account. Opportunity charging of electric vehicles (EVs) in a microgrid for power balancing, voltage/frequency controls, etc., can also be a good consideration. To smoothen power fluctuations, energy storage systems need optimal planning, designs, and controls of their centralized/distributed forms. Stable operation is very important for microgrids. Thus, small-signal and transient stability analysis of microgrids with a high penetration of grid-forming converter-based generations should be conducted. In addition, fault ride-through operations of power converters can enhance the reliability and resilience of microgrids. For interlinking microgrid clusters, high-power solid-state transformers are the control objectives.

In this Special Issue, regarding the topics of “Microgrids and Smart Grids”, submissions about cutting-edge theoretical and experimental studies, as well as recent advances detailed in comprehensive reviews, are welcome.

Dr. Yinghao Shan
Dr. Zilin Li
Prof. Dr. Adrian Ioinovici
Prof. Dr. Josep M. Guerrero
Dr. Jiefeng Hu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microgrid
  • smart grid
  • hierarchical control
  • droop control (grid-forming converter)
  • model predictive control
  • cyber-physical system
  • artificial intelligence algorithms
  • economic optimization
  • heterogeneous renewable energy generations
  • fault ride-through operations
  • centralized/distributed energy storage systems
  • opportunity charging of EVs
  • solid-state transformers
  • stability analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 6377 KiB  
Article
Transactive Demand–Response Framework for High Renewable Penetrated Multi-Energy Prosumer Aggregators in the Context of a Smart Grid
by Wei Lou, Shenglong Zhu, Jinjin Ding, Taiyun Zhu, Ming Wang, Licheng Sun, Feili Zhong and Xiaodong Yang
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10083; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810083 - 7 Sep 2023
Viewed by 994
Abstract
Demand–response (DR) can provide the economic flexibility required to adapt a high proportion of renewable energy in the context of a smart grid. This paper proposes a transactive DR framework to enable the multi-time-scale proactive participation of demand-side flexible multi-energy resources. In this [...] Read more.
Demand–response (DR) can provide the economic flexibility required to adapt a high proportion of renewable energy in the context of a smart grid. This paper proposes a transactive DR framework to enable the multi-time-scale proactive participation of demand-side flexible multi-energy resources. In this framework, the distribution system operator distributes the real-time DR request and the high renewable penetrated multi-energy prosumer aggregators provide the ancillary services based on their adjustable potential. To facilitate such multi-time-scale prosumer–operator interactions, a flexibility potential evaluation method is developed for the quantification and pricing of prosumer flexibility. The positive and negative flexibility potential of the demand-side prosumer aggregators are defined as deviations from the optimal pre-dispatch operation, which are further quantified using the aspects of flexible time and power. Based on the introduction of a flexibility pricing mechanism to identify the economically optimal ancillary service requirements, each prosumer aggregator performs an optimal real-time DR scheduling. Case studies over several DR schemes are performed to confirm the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method on the economy and flexibility of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microgrid and Smart Grid: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 9114 KiB  
Article
Dynamic Interactions between Parallel Grid-Forming Inverters in a Microgrid
by Sulaiman Z. Almutairi
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 6989; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13126989 - 9 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1435
Abstract
The potential instability issues caused by the dynamic interactions between parallel grid-forming inverters are examined. The approach adopted for analysis is s-domain admittance-based eigenvalue and mode shape analysis. This admittance is based on a five-node circuit diagram after the conversion of each [...] Read more.
The potential instability issues caused by the dynamic interactions between parallel grid-forming inverters are examined. The approach adopted for analysis is s-domain admittance-based eigenvalue and mode shape analysis. This admittance is based on a five-node circuit diagram after the conversion of each electric circuit element and inverter control unit into impedance models. Eigenvalue analysis results show that unstable resonance modes may exist due to the interactions of two parallel inverters. Impacts of transmission line length, the converter control’s virtual impedance unit, and the voltage feed-forward unit are examined via the eigenvalue and mode shape analysis. The results show that the virtual impedance control has a negligible influence on the resonance while the voltage feed-forward unit stabilizes the resonance. Finally, the stability analysis is validated using electromagnetic transient (EMT) simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microgrid and Smart Grid: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop