Special Issue "Effect of Oxidative Stress on Reproduction and Development"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giulia Guerriero
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Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Interests: antioxidative physiological defence; steroids and steroid receptors; antioxidants under steroid control; reproductive health assessment; reprotoxicity monitoring; endangered species and validation of non-destructive examination methods; biodiversity conservation microassays
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Gerardino D’Errico
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Interests: oxidative stress monitoring; reactive oxygen species; analytical and physico-chemical methods; electron paramagnetic resonance; non-invasive environmental monitoring; spectroscopic methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a growing amount of literature on the effects of oxidative stress resulting from the imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants. Stressors, by inducing physiological and reproductive disorders, determine failures in various cellular processes, such as development, differentiation, growth, regeneration, and regression, threating the survival of the living species. Although a definite role of free radicals and antioxidants is well-established, there is sparse knowledge of their role in a multitude of stressors such as temperature fluctuations, osmotic stress, alterations in oxygen availability, and other anthropogenic impacts, all factors which can directly affect free radical chemistry during reproduction and development. Therefore, we cordially invite authors to contribute to this Special Issue with original research articles and reviews on how global warming, plastics, biofoulants, metals, etc. induce oxidative stress effects on animal and vegetal reproduction. Critical and objective perspectives on hormones and vitamins and on factors that limit or facilitate fertility and fertilization also fall within the scope of this Special Issue. Data collected on this issue may represent a new opportunity to answer basic questions on conservation and sustainability, and indicate to us how we can perform assessments by oxidant and/or antioxidant detection.

Prof. Dr. Giulia Guerriero
Prof. Dr. Gerardino D’Errico
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • free radicals and antioxidants;
  • oxidative stress;
  • endocrine disruption;
  • thermal fertility limit (TFL);
  • biodiversity conservation and sustainability;
  • hormones and vitamins;
  • reproduction;
  • development and nutrigenomics;
  • methods for reactive oxygen species detection and antioxidant property determination;
  • investigations on the mechanism of action of new antioxidants under steroid control.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Composition of Royal Jelly (RJ) and Its Anti-Androgenic Effect on Reproductive Parameters in a Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) Animal Model
Antioxidants 2020, 9(6), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9060499 - 07 Jun 2020
Abstract
Royal jelly (RJ) has been shown to contribute its positive effects upon imbalance in the reproductive system. However, it remains unknown as to whether RJ has an anti-androgenic effect on reproductive parameters in a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) animal model. Composition of RJ [...] Read more.
Royal jelly (RJ) has been shown to contribute its positive effects upon imbalance in the reproductive system. However, it remains unknown as to whether RJ has an anti-androgenic effect on reproductive parameters in a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) animal model. Composition of RJ was assessed by phytochemical screening and the LC–MS method. Forty immature female rats (3 weeks, 40–50 g) were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 per group), i.e., control, testosterone (T), T+100RJ (100 mg/kg/day), T+200RJ (200 mg/kg/day RJ), and T+400RJ (400 mg/kg/day RJ) groups. Hyperandrogenism was induced by daily subcutaneous injection of T propionate for 3 weeks, followed by oral RJ for 4 weeks. The T+200RJ group had a significantly higher follicle-stimulating hormone level, and significantly lower luteinizing hormone, testosterone, and estradiol levels in comparison to the T group. Malondialdehyde level and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly lower, while total antioxidant capacity level was significantly higher in the T+200RJ group compared to the T group. Histologically, the T+200RJ group showed recovery of various stages of ovarian follicular development. RJ at 200 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks significantly improved reproductive parameters in PCOS rats partly due to its anti-androgenic effect through antioxidant action and probably due to modulation on estrogenic activity, which needs further study to evaluate its exact mechanism of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Oxidative Stress on Reproduction and Development)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Oxidative Stress and BPA Toxicity: An Antioxidant Approach for Male and Female Reproductive Dysfunction
Antioxidants 2020, 9(5), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9050405 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a non-persistent anthropic and environmentally ubiquitous compound widely employed and detected in many consumer products and food items; thus, human exposure is prolonged. Over the last ten years, many studies have examined the underlying molecular mechanisms of BPA toxicity [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a non-persistent anthropic and environmentally ubiquitous compound widely employed and detected in many consumer products and food items; thus, human exposure is prolonged. Over the last ten years, many studies have examined the underlying molecular mechanisms of BPA toxicity and revealed links among BPA-induced oxidative stress, male and female reproductive defects, and human disease. Because of its hormone-like feature, BPA shows tissue effects on specific hormone receptors in target cells, triggering noxious cellular responses associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. As a metabolic and endocrine disruptor, BPA impairs redox homeostasis via the increase of oxidative mediators and the reduction of antioxidant enzymes, causing mitochondrial dysfunction, alteration in cell signaling pathways, and induction of apoptosis. This review aims to examine the scenery of the current BPA literature on understanding how the induction of oxidative stress can be considered the “fil rouge” of BPA’s toxic mechanisms of action with pleiotropic outcomes on reproduction. Here, we focus on the protective effects of five classes of antioxidants—vitamins and co-factors, natural products (herbals and phytochemicals), melatonin, selenium, and methyl donors (used alone or in combination)—that have been found useful to counteract BPA toxicity in male and female reproductive functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Oxidative Stress on Reproduction and Development)
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