Special Issue "Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of the Natural Products"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jose M. Prieto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK
Interests: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities of the natural products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Guillermo R. Schinella
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Chair of Basic Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of La Plata, La Plata, Argentina
Interests: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities of the natural products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For several years, it has been clear that inflammation and cancer are intimately interlinked, and that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a fundamental role in the origin and maintenance of both conditions. Tumor-induced inflammation is widely recognized as a characteristic hallmark of cancer and it actively contributes to tumor progression and metastasis. 

While our understanding of the role of ROS in both inflammation and cancer has matured significantly, it is still uncertain how to harness antioxidants as a valid therapeutic approach: at moderate concentration, ROS activates the cancer cell survival signaling cascade while, at high concentrations, ROS can cause cancer cell apoptosis.  To complicate matters further, many of the reports on the anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects of antioxidants are regarded as pseudoscience due to an abuse of irrelevant in vitro models at non-physiological concentrations. Despite this complex situation, we strongly believe that the modulation of ROS levels has clinical potential.

Therefore, this Special Issue of Antioxidants (MDPI) will highlight the profound links between ROS-mediated specific and unspecific oxidative processes, inflammation, and cancer. We welcome submissions that contribute to this area of research in any fashion although we encourage bench-to-bedside approaches with either synthetic or natural products.

Dr. Jose M. Prieto
Dr. Guillermo R. Schinella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Free radicals
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Cancer
  • Inflammation
  • Antioxidants

Published Papers (11 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
The Herbal Formula JI017 Induces ER Stress via Nox4 in Breast Cancer Cells
Antioxidants 2021, 10(12), 1881; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10121881 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 190
Abstract
Chemotherapy is a powerful anti-tumor therapeutic strategy; however, resistance to treatment remains a serious concern. To overcome chemoresistance, combination therapy with anticancer drugs is a potential strategy. We developed a novel herbal extract, JI017, with lower toxicity and lesser side effects. JI017 induced [...] Read more.
Chemotherapy is a powerful anti-tumor therapeutic strategy; however, resistance to treatment remains a serious concern. To overcome chemoresistance, combination therapy with anticancer drugs is a potential strategy. We developed a novel herbal extract, JI017, with lower toxicity and lesser side effects. JI017 induced programmed cell death and excessive unfolded protein response through the release of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium in breast cancer cells. JI017 treatment increased the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, including p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4, and CHOP, via the activation of both exosomal GRP78 and cell lysate GRP78. The ROS inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium and N-acetyl cysteine suppressed apoptosis and excessive ER stress by inhibiting Nox4 in JI017-treated breast cancer cells. Furthermore, in paclitaxel-resistant breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7R and MDA-MB-231R, a combination of JI017 and paclitaxel overcame paclitaxel resistance by blocking epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes, such as the downregulation of E-cadherin expression and the upregulation of HIF-1α, vimentin, Snail, and Slug expression. These findings suggested that JI017 exerts a powerful anti-cancer effect in breast cancer and a combination therapy of JI017 and paclitaxel may be a potential cancer therapy for paclitaxel resistant breast cancer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Protective Effect of Polymethoxyflavones Isolated from Kaempferia parviflora against TNF-α-Induced Human Dermal Fibroblast Damage
Antioxidants 2021, 10(10), 1609; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101609 - 13 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 547
Abstract
Similar to other organs, the skin undergoes a natural aging process. Moreover, constant direct exposure to environmental stresses, including ultraviolet irradiation, causes the signs of skin aging to appear rather early. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory responses accelerate skin damage in extrinsic [...] Read more.
Similar to other organs, the skin undergoes a natural aging process. Moreover, constant direct exposure to environmental stresses, including ultraviolet irradiation, causes the signs of skin aging to appear rather early. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory responses accelerate skin damage in extrinsic aging. In this study, we aimed to investigate the skin protective effects of polymethoxyflavones found in Kaempferia parviflora against oxidative stress and inflammation-induced damage in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The experimental data identified 5,7,4′ trimethoxyflavone (TMF) as the most potent constituent in preventing TNF-α-induced HDF damage among the tested compounds and it was not only effective in inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) production but also in stimulating collagen, type I, and alpha 1 (COLIA1) expression. TMF suppressed TNF-α-stimulated generation of ROS and pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in HDFs. TMF also inhibited the pathways regulating fibroblast damage, including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), activator protein 1 (AP-1), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). In conclusion, TMF may be a potential agent for preventing skin aging and other dermatological disorders associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Burmannic Acid Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Oxidative Stress Response of Oral Cancer Cells
Antioxidants 2021, 10(10), 1588; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101588 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 452
Abstract
Burmannic acid (BURA) is a new apocarotenoid bioactive compound derived from Indonesian cinnamon; however, its anticancer effect has rarely been investigated in oral cancer cells. In this investigation, the consequences of the antiproliferation of oral cancer cells effected by BURA were evaluated. BURA [...] Read more.
Burmannic acid (BURA) is a new apocarotenoid bioactive compound derived from Indonesian cinnamon; however, its anticancer effect has rarely been investigated in oral cancer cells. In this investigation, the consequences of the antiproliferation of oral cancer cells effected by BURA were evaluated. BURA selectively suppressed cell proliferation of oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27) but showed little cytotoxicity to normal oral cells (HGF-1). In terms of mechanism, BURA perturbed cell cycle distribution, upregulated mitochondrial superoxide, induced mitochondrial depolarization, triggered γH2AX and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA damage, and induced apoptosis and caspase 3/8/9 activation in oral cancer cells. Application of N-acetylcysteine confirmed oxidative stress as the critical factor in promoting antiproliferation, apoptosis, and DNA damage in oral cancer cells. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Antioxidant Activity and Cytotoxicity against Cancer Cell Lines of the Extracts from Novel Xylaria Species Associated with Termite Nests and LC-MS Analysis
Antioxidants 2021, 10(10), 1557; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10101557 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 462
Abstract
Xylaria species associated with termite nests or soil have been considered rare species in nature and the few which have been reported upon have been found to act as a rich source of bioactive metabolites. This study evaluated 10 ethyl acetate extracts of [...] Read more.
Xylaria species associated with termite nests or soil have been considered rare species in nature and the few which have been reported upon have been found to act as a rich source of bioactive metabolites. This study evaluated 10 ethyl acetate extracts of five new Xylaria species associated with termite nests or soil for their antioxidant activity, and cytotoxicity against different cancer and normal cell lines. DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities of the extracts demonstrated strong capacity with low IC50 values. The highest observed activities belonged to X. vinacea SWUF18-2.3 having IC50 values of 0.194 ± 0.031 mg/mL for DPPH assay and 0.020 ± 0.004 mg/mL for ABTS assay. Total phenolic content ranged from 0.826 ± 0.123 to 3.629 ± 0.381 g GAE/g crude extract which correlated with antioxidant activities. The high total phenolic content could contribute to the high antioxidant activities. Cytotoxicity was recorded against A549, HepG2, HeLa and PNT2 and resulted in broad spectrum to specific activity depending on the cell lines. The highest activities were observed with X. subintraflava SWUF16-11.1 which resulted in 11.15 ± 0.32 to 13.17 ± 2.37% cell viability at a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Moreover, LC-MS fingerprints indicated over 61 peaks from all isolates. There were 18 identified and 43 unidentified compounds compared to mass databases. The identified compounds were from various groups of diterpenoids, diterpenes, cytochalasin, flavones, flavonoids, polyphenols, steroids and derivatives, triterpenoids and tropones. These results indicate that Xylaria spp. has abundant secondary metabolites that could be further explored for their therapeutic properties. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Lysimachiae Herba Inhibits Inflammatory Reactions and Improves Lipopolysaccharide/D-Galactosamine-Induced Hepatic Injury
Antioxidants 2021, 10(9), 1387; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10091387 - 30 Aug 2021
Viewed by 469
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects of Lysimachiae Herba ethanolic extract (LHE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and in a LPS/D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute hepatitis mouse model. Then, the production of inflammatory mediators and the activation of related pathways in macrophages [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects of Lysimachiae Herba ethanolic extract (LHE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and in a LPS/D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute hepatitis mouse model. Then, the production of inflammatory mediators and the activation of related pathways in macrophages were explored. Finally, we assessed the serum aminotransferase levels and the expression of inflammatory/antioxidant molecules in liver tissues in mice. Results revealed that LHE treatment significantly inhibited the production of inflammatory mediators in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Molecular data showed that LHE remarkably increased the activities of the antioxidant pathway and inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase as well as the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB induced by LPS. Furthermore, it prevented acute liver damage caused by LPS/D-GalN-induced hepatitis by inhibiting aminotransferase levels and histopathological changes in mice. Moreover, treatment with LHE significantly inhibited the activation of inflammatory pathways and increased the expression of antioxidant molecules including heme oxygenase-1/Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2. In conclusion, LHE has potent anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects in LPS-stimulated macrophages and the LPS/D-GalN-induced acute hepatitis mouse model. Thus, it can be a treatment option for inflammation, hepatitis, and liver injury. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activity of Extracts from Some Commercial Apple Cultivars in Two Colorectal and Glioblastoma Human Cell Lines
Antioxidants 2021, 10(7), 1098; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10071098 - 08 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1080
Abstract
Cancer initiation and development are closely related to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate apple extracts and individual tritepenes antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities. Dry extracts of apple were analyzed by HPLC-PDA. A hyaluronidase inhibition assay [...] Read more.
Cancer initiation and development are closely related to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate apple extracts and individual tritepenes antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities. Dry extracts of apple were analyzed by HPLC-PDA. A hyaluronidase inhibition assay was selected to determine the anti-inflammatory effect. Cytotoxic activities against human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (HT-29) and human glioblastoma cell line (U-87) were determined using MTT, cell colony formation, and spheroid growth assays. Radical scavenging and reducing activities were evaluated using DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and CUPRAC assays, respectively. The apple extracts inhibited hyaluronidase from 26.38 ± 4.4% to 35.05 ± 3.8%. The AAW extract possessed the strongest cytotoxic activity (EC50 varied from 113.3 ± 11.11 µg/mL to 119.7 ± 4.0 µg/mL). The AEW extract had four and five times stronger antiradical activity when determined by ABTS and DPPH, and two and eight times stronger reducing activity when evaluated by CUPRAC and FRAP, respectively. Understanding the mechanisms of apple extracts and individual triterpenes as hyaluronidase inhibitors and antioxidants related in cancer development may be a benefit to future study in vivo, as well as cancer prognosis or the development of new, innovative food supplements, which could be used for chronic disease prevention. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Eupatilin Impacts on the Progression of Colon Cancer by Mitochondria Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants 2021, 10(6), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10060957 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1170
Abstract
Colon cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer types. Some colon cancer cases resist standard anticancer drugs. Therefore, many studies have focused on developing therapeutic supplements using natural products with low side effects and broad physiological activity. Eupatilin is a flavonoid [...] Read more.
Colon cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer types. Some colon cancer cases resist standard anticancer drugs. Therefore, many studies have focused on developing therapeutic supplements using natural products with low side effects and broad physiological activity. Eupatilin is a flavonoid that is mainly extracted from artemisia and promotes apoptosis in numerous cancer types. However, since the current understanding of its physiological mechanisms on colon cancer cells is insufficient, we investigated how eupatilin affects the growth of two colon cancer cell lines, namely HCT116 and HT29. Our results showed that eupatilin inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis accompanied by mitochondrial depolarization. It also induces oxidative stress in colon cancer cells and regulates the expression of proteins involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic process. Moreover, eupatilin may target the PI3K/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in colon cancer cells. It also prevents colon cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, eupatilin has a synergistic effect with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a standard anticancer drug) on 5-FU-resistant HCT116 cells. These results suggest that eupatilin can be developed as an adjuvant to enhance traditional anticancer drugs in colon cancer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Resveratrol Targets a Variety of Oncogenic and Oncosuppressive Signaling for Ovarian Cancer Prevention and Treatment
Antioxidants 2021, 10(11), 1718; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10111718 - 28 Oct 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and is also the major cause of death among women from gynecologic malignancies. A combination of surgery and chemotherapy is the major therapy for ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, despite good response rates to initial surgery and chemotherapy, most [...] Read more.
Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and is also the major cause of death among women from gynecologic malignancies. A combination of surgery and chemotherapy is the major therapy for ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, despite good response rates to initial surgery and chemotherapy, most patients relapse and have a generally poor survival rate. The present research sheds light on the therapeutic effects of multiple natural products in patients with ovarian cancer. Notably, these natural ingredients do not have adverse effects on healthy cells and tissues, indicating that natural products can serve as a safe alternative therapy for ovarian cancer. Trans-3,4,5′-Trihydroxystibene (resveratrol) is a natural product that is commonly found in the human diet and that has been shown to have anticancer effects on various human cancer cells. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the progress of resveratrol against tumor cell proliferation, metastasis, apoptosis induction, autophagy, sensitization, and antioxidation as well as anti-inflammation. It also provides information regarding the role of resveratrol analogues in ovarian cancer. A better understanding of the role of resveratrol in ovarian cancer may provide a new array for the prevention and therapy of ovarian cancer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Tocotrienols as an Anti-Breast Cancer Agent
Antioxidants 2021, 10(9), 1383; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10091383 - 29 Aug 2021
Viewed by 784
Abstract
In the past few years, breast cancer has become the most prevalent type of cancer. The majority of patients receive combinatorial chemotherapy treatments, which may result in increased risk of developing drug resistance, a reduced quality of life, and substantial side effects. Treatment [...] Read more.
In the past few years, breast cancer has become the most prevalent type of cancer. The majority of patients receive combinatorial chemotherapy treatments, which may result in increased risk of developing drug resistance, a reduced quality of life, and substantial side effects. Treatment modalities that could lessen the physical toll of standard treatments or act in synergy with chemotherapeutic treatments would benefit women worldwide. Research into tocotrienols has thus far demonstrated their potential to be such an agent, with tocotrienols surpassing the pharmacological potential of tocopherols. Further research using in vitro and preclinical breast cancer models to support clinical trials is needed. This review uses bibliometric analysis to highlight this gap in research and summarizes the current and future landscape of tocotrienols as an anti-breast cancer agent. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Research Development on Anti-Microbial and Antioxidant Properties of Camel Milk and Its Role as an Anti-Cancer and Anti-Hepatitis Agent
Antioxidants 2021, 10(5), 788; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10050788 - 17 May 2021
Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Camel milk is a rich source of vitamin C, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), beta-caseins and milk whey proteins, including lactoferrin, lysozyme, lactoperoxidase, alpha-lactalbumin and immunoglobulin. The lactoferrin plays a key role in several physiological functions, such as conferring antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory functions [...] Read more.
Camel milk is a rich source of vitamin C, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), beta-caseins and milk whey proteins, including lactoferrin, lysozyme, lactoperoxidase, alpha-lactalbumin and immunoglobulin. The lactoferrin plays a key role in several physiological functions, such as conferring antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory functions in cells. Similarly, the camel milk alpha-lactalbumin has shown greater antioxidative activity because of its higher antioxidant amino acid residues. The antioxidant properties of camel milk have also been ascribed to the structural conformation of its beta-caseins. Upon hydrolysis, the beta-caseins lead to some bioactive peptides having antioxidant activities. Consequently, the vitamin C in camel milk has a significant antioxidant effect and can be used as a source of vitamin C when the climate is harsh. Furthermore, the lysozyme and immunoglobulins in camel milk have anti-microbial and immune regulatory properties. The LAB isolated from camel milk have a protective role against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Moreover, the LAB can be used as a probiotic and may restore the oxidative status caused by various pathogenic bacterial infections. Various diseases such as cancer and hepatitis have been associated with oxidative stress. Camel milk could increase antiproliferative effects and regulate antioxidant genes during cancer and hepatitis, hence ameliorating oxidative stress. In the current review, we have illustrated the anti-microbial and antioxidant properties of camel milk in detail. In addition, the anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis properties of camel milk have also been discussed. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Application of Polypodiopsida Class in Nanotechnology–Potential towards Development of More Effective Bioactive Solutions
Antioxidants 2021, 10(5), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox10050748 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 639
Abstract
The area of phytosynthesized nanomaterials is rapidly developing, with numerous studies being published yearly. The use of plant extracts is an alternative method to reduce the toxic potential of the nanomaterials and the interest in obtaining phytosynthesized nanoparticles is usually directed towards accessible [...] Read more.
The area of phytosynthesized nanomaterials is rapidly developing, with numerous studies being published yearly. The use of plant extracts is an alternative method to reduce the toxic potential of the nanomaterials and the interest in obtaining phytosynthesized nanoparticles is usually directed towards accessible and common plant species, ferns not being explored to their real potential in this field. The developed nanoparticles could benefit from their superior antimicrobial and antioxidant properties (compared with the nanoparticles obtained by other routes), thus proposing an important alternative against health care-associated and drug-resistant infections, as well as in other types of applications. The present review aims to summarize the explored application of ferns in nanotechnology and related areas, as well as the current bottlenecks and future perspectives, as emerging from the literature data. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop