Special Issue "Large Animal Medicine: Advances in Calf Health"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Cattle".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ingrid Lorenz
Website
Guest Editor
Department Cattle Health Service, Bavarian Animal Health Service
Interests: cattle health; calf health; production diseases
Dr. Florian Trefz
Website
Guest Editor
Clinic for Ruminants, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Switzerland
Interests: calf health; internal medicine, gastrointestinal diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite a vast scientific knowledge in all areas of calf health and husbandry calf mortality and morbidity are still unacceptably high all around the world. Especially the classical multifactorial diseases diarrhea and respiratory disease cause huge economic losses to the dairy and beef industry due to calf losses, treatment costs and poor performance. We know for a long time how important colostrum management is for calf health, and still failure of passive transfer is generally found in problem herds. There has been major scientific progress in dairy calf nutrition, but the uptake of new recommendations by the industry is slow.    

In this Special Issue, we welcome original research papers and reviews dealing with all aspects of calf health and performance on individual animal or herd level. We also invite papers that help understand and bridge the knowledge-behavior gap related to calf rearing.

Dr. Ingrid Lorenz
Dr. Florian Trefz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dairy calves
  • Suckler calves
  • Diarrhea
  • Respiratory disease
  • Colostrum
  • Calf nutrition
  • Calf housing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Welfare Assessment in Calves Fattened According to the “Outdoor Veal Calf” Concept and in Conventional Veal Fattening Operations in Switzerland
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1810; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101810 - 05 Oct 2020
Abstract
The “outdoor veal calf” system was developed to encounter the demand for a veal fattening system that allows for reducing antimicrobial use without impairing animal welfare. Management improvements including direct purchase, short transportation, vaccination, three-week quarantine in individual hutches, and open-air housing in [...] Read more.
The “outdoor veal calf” system was developed to encounter the demand for a veal fattening system that allows for reducing antimicrobial use without impairing animal welfare. Management improvements including direct purchase, short transportation, vaccination, three-week quarantine in individual hutches, and open-air housing in small groups in a roofed, straw-bedded paddock with a group hutch were implemented in a prospective intervention study (1905 calves, 19 intervention and 19 control farms, over one year): antimicrobial use was five times lower in "outdoor veal" farms compared to control farms (p < 0.001), but it was crucial to ensure that antimicrobial treatment reduction was not associated with decreased animal welfare, i.e., that sick animals were not left untreated. Welfare was assessed monthly on the farms, and organs of 339 calves were examined after slaughter. Cough and nasal discharge were observed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) less often in intervention than in control farms, mortality (3.1% vs. 6.3%, p = 0.020) and lung lesion prevalence (26% vs. 46%, p < 0.001) were lower; no group difference was seen in abomasal lesion prevalence (65% vs. 72%). Thus, besides reduced antimicrobial use, calf health and welfare were improved in "outdoor veal calf" farms in comparison to traditional operations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Large Animal Medicine: Advances in Calf Health)
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