Cancer Immunotherapy Research in Veterinary Medicine

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 14 June 2024 | Viewed by 1606

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: veterinary oncology; histopathology; veterinary general pathology; comparative pathology; cancer biomarkers; cancer immunology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: veterinary pathology; comparative pathology; veterinary oncology; histopathology; cancer immunology; cancer biomarkers; veterinary anatomic pathology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment and has become an increasingly important approach in human oncology. The main fields of immunotherapy include the study of the immune system role in tumor progression and their dynamic interaction, the tumor microenvironment, the development, and the use of therapies stimulating the immune system to elicit an anti-tumoral response. Based on the underlying mechanism, different categories of immunotherapy have been developed in cancer treatment, such as cancer vaccines, immune checkpoint inhibitors (es PD-1 and CTLA-4), adoptive transfer of engineered cells (such as T-cells, natural killer cells or macrophages), cytokine therapies, monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents, and oncolytic virotherapy.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to focus on immunotherapy approaches in veterinary medicine, involving pathological, clinical, and translational studies on immunotherapy biomarkers, immunology signaling pathways, and novel immunotherapies.

Dr. Francesca Millanta
Dr. Francesca Parisi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • immunobiomarkers
  • immunotherapy
  • immune signal pathways
  • immune system
  • veterinary oncology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

25 pages, 2846 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Nucleosome, Ferritin and LDH Levels in Blood with Clinical Response before and after Electrochemotherapy Combined with IL-12 Gene Electrotransfer for the Treatment of Mast Cell Tumours in Dogs
by Maša Vilfan, Urša Lampreht Tratar, Nina Milevoj, Alenka Nemec Svete, Maja Čemažar, Gregor Serša and Nataša Tozon
Animals 2024, 14(3), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14030438 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1160
Abstract
Electrochemotherapy (ECT) in combination with the gene electrotransfer of interleukin 12 (IL-12 GET) has been successfully used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of mast cell tumours (MCT), but the biomarkers that could predict response to this treatment have not yet been investigated. [...] Read more.
Electrochemotherapy (ECT) in combination with the gene electrotransfer of interleukin 12 (IL-12 GET) has been successfully used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of mast cell tumours (MCT), but the biomarkers that could predict response to this treatment have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma nucleosome and serum ferritin concentrations, as well as the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, in the serum of treated patients before and one and six months after treatment to evaluate their utility as potential biomarkers that could predict response to the combined treatment. The study was conducted in 48 patients with a total of 86 MCTs that we treated with the combined treatment. The blood samples used for analysing the potential predictive biomarkers were taken before treatment and one and six months after treatment, when the response to treatment was also assessed. The Nu. Q® Vet Cancer Test, the Canine Ferritin ELISA Kit, and the RX Daytona+ automated biochemical analyser were used to analyse the blood samples. The results showed that the plasma nucleosome concentration (before treatment (BT): 32.84 ng/mL (median); one month after treatment (1 M AT): 58.89 ng/mL (median); p = 0.010) and serum LDH activity (BT: 59.75 U/L (median); 1 M AT: 107.5 U/L (median); p = 0.012) increased significantly one month after treatment and that the increase correlated significantly with the presence of a more pronounced local reaction (necrosis, swelling, etc.) at that time point for both markers (nucleosome: BT (necrosis): 21.61 ng/mL (median); 1 M AT (necrosis): 69.92 ng/mL (median), p = 0.030; LDH: BT (necrosis): 54.75 U/L (median); 1 M AT (necrosis): 100.3 U/L (median), p = 0.048). Therefore, both the plasma nucleosome concentration and serum LDH activity could serve as early indicators of the effect of the treatment. In this context, the serum ferritin concentration showed no significant predictive potential for treatment response (p > 0.999 for all comparisons). In conclusion, this study provides some new and important observations on the use of predictive biomarkers in veterinary oncology. Furthermore, it emphasises the need for the continued identification and validation of potential predictive biomarkers in dogs with MCT and other malignancies undergoing ECT treatment in combination with IL-12 GET to ultimately improve treatment outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Immunotherapy Research in Veterinary Medicine)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: HER-2 and HER-3 expression in canine melanomas: correlation to prognostic parameters and possible therapeutic implications
Authors: Francesca Millanta; Francesca Parisi; Alessandro Poli; Arianna Pecorari; Luigi Aurisicchio
Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Pisa Evvivax, Rome, Italy

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