Interactions and Relationship between Marine Mammal Ecology and Human Activities

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Mammals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 780

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Aquasearch, Zone Artisanale et Commerciale (ZAC) Les Côteaux, Sainte-Luce, Martinique, France
2. Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski, Rimouski, QC, Canada
Interests: marine megafauna; bioacoustic; human activities; marine ecology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aquasearch, Zone Artisanale et Commerciale (ZAC) Les Côteaux, Sainte-Luce, Martinique, France
Interests: marine ecology; marine mammals; bioacoustic

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Studying the interactions between marine mammals and human activities is of paramount importance in the field of marine biology as these interactions have become increasingly frequent and complex due to the expansion of human activities in marine environments. Understanding these interactions is essential for a number of reasons.

Firstly, marine mammals play a crucial role in ocean ecosystems as predators, regulators of prey populations, and contributors to biodiversity. The impacts of human activities, such as noise pollution, habitat loss, and ship strikes, can disrupt these ecological roles, compromising the balance of marine ecosystems.

Secondly, many marine mammal species are indicators of the health of the oceans and, by monitoring their populations and studying their responses to human activities, scientists can gain valuable information on the overall state of the marine environment and the ways in which human disturbances impact it.

Thirdly, understanding the interactions between marine mammals and human activities is essential for the development of effective conservation strategies. By identifying the main threats and developing appropriate mitigation measures, it is possible to minimize negative impacts on these species and protect their habitats.

In short, studying the interactions between marine mammals and human activities is crucial to preserving marine biodiversity and ensuring the sustainability of ocean ecosystems for future generations.

Dr. Benjamin De Montgolfier
Dr. Marion Poupard
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • marine mammals
  • human activities
  • ecosystems
  • interactions
  • conservation
  • biodiversity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 3450 KiB  
Article
Cetacean Stranding Response Program and Spatial–Temporal Analysis in Taiwan, 1994–2018
by Lien-Siang Chou, Chiou-Ju Yao, Ming-Chih Wang, Wei-Lien Chi, Yun Ho and Wei-Cheng Yang
Animals 2024, 14(12), 1823; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14121823 - 19 Jun 2024
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Abstract
A national cetacean stranding response program in Taiwan has evolved significantly in the past three decades. Initially co-ordinated by National Taiwan University from 1994, the program transitioned to the Taiwan Cetacean Society in 1999, and local governments took on a more prominent role [...] Read more.
A national cetacean stranding response program in Taiwan has evolved significantly in the past three decades. Initially co-ordinated by National Taiwan University from 1994, the program transitioned to the Taiwan Cetacean Society in 1999, and local governments took on a more prominent role after 2009. A comprehensive stranding database (1994–2018) has been maintained, which documented 1320 stranding events involving 1698 animals from at least 27 species. The most commonly stranded species include finless porpoises, bottlenose dolphins, Kogia spp., and Risso’s dolphins. The stranding rates varied annually and seasonally, with increases noted from an average of 16 events per year for the first 3 years to 44–58 events per year between 1997 and 2015, and a sharp rise to over 90 events per year for the period of the last three years. Seasonal variations were also significant, with higher stranding rates during the northeastern monsoon (NEM, October to next April) than that during southwestern monsoon (SWM, May to September). From the aspect of distribution, more frequent and even strandings occurred along the coast of northern Taiwan, while mass strandings were concentrated in the southwestern counties during NEM. Among all strandings, 390 events (29.5%) and 660 animals (38.9%) were live ones. Under great effort in rescuing and rehabilitating 52 cases, 15 cetacean individuals have been released since 2000. Additionally, there have been 56 mass strandings involving at least 11 species since 1994, predominated by pygmy killer whales, particularly during the NEM season along the southwest coast. This study not only contributes to our understanding of the stranding patterns and diversity of the cetaceans in Taiwan, but also provides valuable insights for future conservation strategies on cetaceans in the western Pacific. Full article
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