New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Advances in Companion Animal Dermatology

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2854

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Istituto Veterinario di Novara, S.P.9 Granozzo con Monticello, 28060 Novara, Italy
Interests: genetic and hereditary diseases; autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases; allergic diseases and the possible applications of dermoscopy in veterinary medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Contemporary techniques for investigating skin problems normally include several tools that facilitate the diagnostic process. Over the past several years, dermoscopy as a noninvasive, painless, easy-to-perform technique that reveals morphologic structures and aids the identification and diagnosis of a skin lesion has been widely proven to increase diagnostic accuracy. For example, its use has been traditionally demonstrated in the evaluation of all pigmented and non-pigmented skin lesions. Dermoscopic examination has rapidly expanded to diagnose other dermatological disorders as inflammatory or infectious dermatosis and as trichoscopy for dermoscopic imaging of hair and scalp diseases. Although this technique does not obviate the need for histopathological examination, it is also increasingly gaining significant appreciation in veterinary dermatology together with the growing evidence of new dynamic skin imaging equipment such as high-frequency ultrasound. The use of these advanced techniques has opened up new diagnostic horizons and expanded the possibilities for the detection of many dermatological disorders together with the discovery of a variety of new therapeutic options. Among these, photobiomodulation has been used as a form of light therapy that uses non-ionizing forms of light sources including lasers, LEDs, and broadband light, in the visible and near-infrared spectrum and that has safely implemented the transition from laboratory findings to clinical practice. This tool has demonstrated a positive effect on pain relief and inflammation, wound healing and hair growth.

The aim of this Special Issue is to explore the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches by highlighting the latest advances and moving towards new frontiers of scientific approach and intervention across multiple specialties. Finally, it also stresses the role of team-based interprofessional care.

Dr. Giordana Zanna
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • dermoscopy
  • high-frequency ultrasound
  • MRI (high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in study of the skin)
  • CAP (cold atmospheric plasma-based) skin therapy
  • photobiomodulation low-level laser therapy (LLLT)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 4234 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Impact of Near-Infrared Multiwavelength Locked System Laser Therapy on Skin Microbiome in Atopic Dogs
by Sara Muñoz Declara, Aldo D’Alessandro, Agnese Gori, Benedetta Cerasuolo, Sonia Renzi, Michele Berlanda, Eric Zini, Monica Monici, Duccio Cavalieri and Giordana Zanna
Animals 2024, 14(6), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14060906 - 14 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a newly adopted consensus term to replace the therapeutic application of low-level laser therapy. It has been suggested that PMB influences the microbiome which, in turn, has increasingly been shown to be linked with health and disease. Even though the [...] Read more.
Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a newly adopted consensus term to replace the therapeutic application of low-level laser therapy. It has been suggested that PMB influences the microbiome which, in turn, has increasingly been shown to be linked with health and disease. Even though the use of PBM has also grown dramatically in veterinary medicine, there is still a lack of evidence supporting its effect in vivo. Our objective was to investigate the impact of a dual-wavelength near-infrared laser source (Multiwavelength Locked Laser System, MLS®) on the skin microbiome in atopic dogs. Twenty adult-client-owned atopic dogs were enrolled in the study. The dogs were treated with MLS® laser therapy on one half of the abdominal region, whereas the contralateral side was left untreated and served as a control. Skin microbiome samples were collected before and after MLS® treatments, and then subjected to NGS-based ITS and 16S rRNA analysis. The results showed that while microbiome composition and diversity were not significantly affected, PBM could play a role in modulating the abundance of specific bacterial species, in particular Staphylococcus, that represent a major skin pathogenic strain. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the potential impact of MLS® laser therapy on the skin microbiome in atopic dogs. Full article
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11 pages, 6714 KiB  
Article
Efficient Topical Treatment of Canine Nodular Sebaceous Hyperplasia with a Nitric Acid and Zinc Complex Solution
by Lina Gustafsson, Alison Wilson and Kerstin Bergvall
Animals 2024, 14(4), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14040570 - 08 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Nodular sebaceous gland hyperplasia in the often middle-aged to old dog is a common, benign proliferation that results in exophytic, pink to yellow, alopecic, and often multilobulated nodules. Removal is usually carried out by surgical excision. As many old dogs have comorbidities that [...] Read more.
Nodular sebaceous gland hyperplasia in the often middle-aged to old dog is a common, benign proliferation that results in exophytic, pink to yellow, alopecic, and often multilobulated nodules. Removal is usually carried out by surgical excision. As many old dogs have comorbidities that increase the risk of anesthesia, a topical treatment is warranted. We hypothesized that the application of a solution containing nitric acid, zinc, copper, and organic acids (Verrutop®), would be a safe and efficient way to treat these nodules. Eleven dogs with a total of 29 nodules, grossly compatible with nodular sebaceous gland hyperplasia, were included in the study. Eighteen of the nodules were treated; 11 were left untreated. No anesthesia or sedation was needed. Four weeks after one application, 17/18 treated nodules had decreased by 100% in volume. There was a statistically significant difference in percentual volume change between the treated and untreated nodules from day 0 to day 28 (p < 0.0001). No serious side effects were noted. Sebaceous hyperplasia cannot always be distinguished grossly from sebaceous tumors. Cytological evaluation can be helpful, and in cases of deviant macroscopic features, local recurrence, or more aggressive behavior, the appropriate intervention would be to biopsy or excise the nodule for histopathology. Topical application of Verrutop® is an easy, low-cost, and efficient way to remove canine sebaceous gland hyperplasia with minimal side effects in cases where surgery and anesthesia are not desired. Full article
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