Special Issue "Plant Resistance for the Protection of Cereal Crops from Insect Pests"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael J. Stout

Department of Entomology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 2258922972
Interests: plant-insect interactions; pest management in rice; plant resistance to insects and diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Historically, plant resistance has played a prominent role in management programs for many important insect pests of cereal crops, including Hessian fly in wheat and brown planthopper in rice. However, plant resistance remains an underutilized tactic for other important pests of cereals. Exciting advances in our understanding of the regulation of plant defense responses and the biochemical and morphological bases of plant resistance to insects has opened up new directions for the use of plant resistance in pest management. This Special Issue will explore recent advances in the understanding and use of plant resistance in cereals.

Prof. Dr. Michael J. Stout
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Host-plant resistance
  • Integrated pest management
  • Induced resistance
  • Defense responses
  • Secondary metabolites
  • Antibiosis
  • Antixenosis
  • Tolerance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite in Arthropod-Resistant Rye-Wheat Translocation Lines
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 4 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (265 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The wheat curl mite, Aceria toschiella (Keifer), and a complex of viruses vectored by A. toschiella substantially reduce wheat yields in every wheat-producing continent in the world. The development of A. toschiella-resistant wheat cultivars is a proven economically and ecologically viable method [...] Read more.
The wheat curl mite, Aceria toschiella (Keifer), and a complex of viruses vectored by A. toschiella substantially reduce wheat yields in every wheat-producing continent in the world. The development of A. toschiella-resistant wheat cultivars is a proven economically and ecologically viable method of controlling this pest. This study assessed A. toschiella resistance in wheat genotypes containing the H13, H21, H25, H26, H18 and Hdic genes for resistance to the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) and in 94M370 wheat, which contains the Dn7 gene for resistance to the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov). A. toschiella populations produced on plants containing Dn7 and H21 were significantly lower than those on plants of the susceptible control and no different than those on the resistant control. Dn7 resistance to D. noxia and H21 resistance to M. destructor resulted from translocations of chromatin from rye into wheat (H21—2BS/2RL, Dn7—1BL/1RS). These results provide new wheat pest management information, indicating that Dn7 and H21 constitute resources that can be used to reduce yield losses caused by A. toschiella, M. destructor, D. noxia, and wheat streak mosaic virus infection by transferring multi-pest resistance to single sources of germplasm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Resistance for the Protection of Cereal Crops from Insect Pests)
Open AccessArticle Geographic and Research Center Origins of Rice Resistance to Asian Planthoppers and Leafhoppers: Implications for Rice Breeding and Gene Deployment
Received: 22 August 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 18 September 2017 / Published: 21 September 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1711 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study examines aspects of virulence to resistant rice varieties among planthoppers and leafhoppers. Using a series of resistant varieties, brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, virulence was assessed in seedlings and early-tillering plants at seven research centers in South and East Asia. Virulence [...] Read more.
This study examines aspects of virulence to resistant rice varieties among planthoppers and leafhoppers. Using a series of resistant varieties, brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, virulence was assessed in seedlings and early-tillering plants at seven research centers in South and East Asia. Virulence of the whitebacked planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, in Taiwan and the Philippines was also assessed. Phylogenetic analysis of the varieties using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) indicated a clade of highly resistant varieties from South Asia with two further South Asian clades of moderate resistance. Greenhouse bioassays indicated that planthoppers can develop virulence against multiple resistance genes including genes introgressed from wild rice species. Nilaparvata lugens populations from Punjab (India) and the Mekong Delta (Vietnam) were highly virulent to a range of key resistance donors irrespective of variety origin. Sogatella furcifera populations were less virulent to donors than N. lugens; however, several genes for resistance to S. furcifera are now ineffective in East Asia. A clade of International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)-bred varieties and breeding lines, without identified leafhopper-resistance genes, were highly resistant to the green leafhopper, Nephotettix virescens. Routine phenotyping during breeding programs likely maintains high levels of quantitative resistance to leafhoppers. We discuss these results in the light of breeding and deploying resistant rice in Asia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Resistance for the Protection of Cereal Crops from Insect Pests)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Volatile Semiochemical Mediated Plant Defense in Cereals: A Novel Strategy for Crop Protection
Received: 31 July 2017 / Revised: 27 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (853 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plants have evolved highly intriguing ways of defending themselves against insect attacks, including through emission of defense volatiles. These volatiles serve the plant’s defense by directly repelling phytophagous insects and/or indirectly through attracting natural enemies antagonistic to the herbivores. Several laboratory studies established [...] Read more.
Plants have evolved highly intriguing ways of defending themselves against insect attacks, including through emission of defense volatiles. These volatiles serve the plant’s defense by directly repelling phytophagous insects and/or indirectly through attracting natural enemies antagonistic to the herbivores. Several laboratory studies established the potential of improving plant resistance against insect attacks by manipulating the plant-derived volatile semiochemicals emissions. Yet, more efforts need to be conducted to translate the promising laboratory studies to fight economically-important crop pests under real field conditions. This is needed to address an increasing demand for alternative pest control options driven by ecological and environmental costs associated with the use of broad-spectrum insecticides. The practical examples discussed in this review paper demonstrate the real prospect of exploiting an inducible and constitutive plant volatile semiochemicals for developing novel and ecologically-sustainable pest management strategies to protect cereal crops from damaging insect pests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Resistance for the Protection of Cereal Crops from Insect Pests)
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