New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310). This special issue belongs to the section "Astronautics & Space Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021) | Viewed by 22976

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
Interests: space systems engineering; concurrent engineering; mechatronics; space manipulators; planetary rovers; space systems miniaturization; spacecraft formation flying; asteroid engineering; intelligent robot teams; reconfigurable manipulators, legged locomotion for exploratory rovers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

The evolution of space science and engineering into a new era is reaching a turning point due to the emergence of diverse global space players, in both private and public sectors, as well as the proliferation of disruptive technologies for space applications. The next phase of research and development in the field will likely lead to a transformation from “spacefaring nations” to “nations of spacecrafters”, resulting in more access to space at a lower cost and faster pace, thus leading to a surge of intimate knowledge of space and its resources.

This Special Issue presents feature papers in the form of original research articles as well as comprehensive state-of-the-art surveys, on recent scientific discoveries and technological advancements in the field. The topics include but are not limited to spacecraft miniaturization; autonomy and intelligence for space systems; spacecraft formation flying dynamics and controls; fractionated spacecraft; concurrent engineering of space systems; space manipulators; on-orbit rendezvous, servicing and assembly; space-based surveillance and in situ exploration; planetary rovers; utilization of space resources; space debris remediation and mitigation; etc.

Only submissions with a very high caliber will be selected for publication in the special issue, through a careful peer-review process on the condition of no valid rejection report from any reviewer.

Prof. Dr. M. Reza Emami
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intelligent space
  • space miniaturization
  • nanosatellite
  • microsatellite
  • satellite swarm
  • spacecraft formation
  • fractionated spacecraft
  • space systems concurrent engineering
  • space debris
  • space surveillance
  • on-orbit servicing
  • space manipulator
  • planetary rover
  • asteroid mining

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 4678 KiB  
Article
VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR) Experimental Positioning for Stratospheric Vehicles
by Lorenzo Frezza, Paolo Marzioli, Fabio Santoni and Fabrizio Piergentili
Aerospace 2021, 8(9), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8090263 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3024
Abstract
The usage of aeronautical radio-frequency navigational aids can support the future stratospheric aviation as back-up positioning systems. Although GNSS has been extensively redundant in the last years of space operations, radio NavAids can still be supportive of navigation and tracking for novel mission [...] Read more.
The usage of aeronautical radio-frequency navigational aids can support the future stratospheric aviation as back-up positioning systems. Although GNSS has been extensively redundant in the last years of space operations, radio NavAids can still be supportive of navigation and tracking for novel mission profiles. As an example, in 2016, VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR) has been proven to work well above its standard service volume limit on a stratospheric balloon flight with the STRATONAV experiment. While VOR provides the “radial” measurement, i.e., the angle between the Magnetic North and the line between the receiver and the transmitting ground station, the intersection of two or more radials at a time allows to perform ground track reconstruction for the vehicle to be tracked. This paper reports the results from the data re-processing from STRATONAV: the acquired radials have been intersected in order to achieve positioning. The radials interfacing method, the position calculation methodology, and the data acquisition strategies from STRATONAV are reported together with the data analysis results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 2211 KiB  
Article
A Comparative Analysis of Multi-Epoch Double-Differenced Pseudorange Observation and Other Dual-Satellite Lunar Global Navigation Systems
by Toshiki Tanaka, Takuji Ebinuma, Shinichi Nakasuka and Heidar Malki
Aerospace 2021, 8(7), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8070191 - 15 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2409
Abstract
In this study, dual-satellite lunar global navigation systems that consist of a constellation of two navigation satellites providing geo-spatial positioning on the lunar surface were compared. In our previous work, we proposed a new dual-satellite relative-positioning navigation method called multi-epoch double-differenced pseudorange observation [...] Read more.
In this study, dual-satellite lunar global navigation systems that consist of a constellation of two navigation satellites providing geo-spatial positioning on the lunar surface were compared. In our previous work, we proposed a new dual-satellite relative-positioning navigation method called multi-epoch double-differenced pseudorange observation (MDPO). While the mathematical model of the MDPO and its behavior under specific conditions were studied, we did not compare its performance with other dual-satellite relative-positioning navigation systems. In this paper, we performed a comparative analysis between the MDPO and other two dual-satellite navigation methods. Based on the difference in their mathematical models, as well as numerical simulation results, we developed useful insights on the system design of dual-satellite lunar global navigation systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 7207 KiB  
Article
Tuning of NASA Standard Breakup Model for Fragmentation Events Modelling
by Nicola Cimmino, Giorgio Isoletta, Roberto Opromolla, Giancarmine Fasano, Aniello Basile, Antonio Romano, Moreno Peroni, Alessandro Panico and Andrea Cecchini
Aerospace 2021, 8(7), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8070185 - 12 Jul 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4150
Abstract
The continuous growth of space debris motivates the development and the improvement of tools that support the monitoring of a more and more congested space environment. Satellite breakup models play a key role to predict and analyze orbital debris evolution, and the NASA [...] Read more.
The continuous growth of space debris motivates the development and the improvement of tools that support the monitoring of a more and more congested space environment. Satellite breakup models play a key role to predict and analyze orbital debris evolution, and the NASA Standard Breakup Model represents a widely used reference, with current activities relevant to its evolution and improvements especially towards fragmentation of small mass spacecraft. From an operational perspective, an important point for fragmentation modelling concerns the tuning of the breakup model to achieve consistency with orbital data of observed fragments. In this framework, this paper proposes an iterative approach to estimate the model inputs, and in particular, the parents’ masses involved in a collision event. The iterative logic exploits the knowledge of Two Line Elements (TLE) of the fragments at some time after the event to adjust the input parameters of the breakup model with the objective of obtaining the same number of real fragments within a certain tolerance. Atmospheric re-entry is accounted for. As a result, the breakup model outputs a set of fragments whose statistical distribution, in terms of number and size, is consistent with the catalogued ones. The iterative approach is demonstrated for two different scenarios (i.e., catastrophic collision and non-catastrophic collision) using numerical simulations. Then, it is also applied to a real collision event. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 14536 KiB  
Article
Innovative Mechanical Design Strategy for Actualizing 80 kg-Class X-Band Active SAR Small Satellite of S-STEP
by Seong-Cheol Kwon, Ji-Hae Son, Sung-Chan Song, Jin-Han Park, Kyung-Rae Koo and Hyun-Ung Oh
Aerospace 2021, 8(6), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8060149 - 26 May 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 6862
Abstract
The Small SAR Technology Experimental Project (S-STEP) mission aims to develop a new (space-based 80 kg-class active X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR)) satellite with a main imaging mode of 1 m resolution stripmap. In the S-STEP mission, to achieve the design goal of [...] Read more.
The Small SAR Technology Experimental Project (S-STEP) mission aims to develop a new (space-based 80 kg-class active X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR)) satellite with a main imaging mode of 1 m resolution stripmap. In the S-STEP mission, to achieve the design goal of developing faster, cheaper, better, and lighter small SAR satellite systems, innovative thermo-mechanical design approaches have been proposed and investigated. The major design approaches are the bus-payload integrated flat plate-type structure, multifunctional transmit/receive (TR) module, and dedicated vibration-free orbit deployer (VFOD) with the function of whole spacecraft vibration isolation. To validate the feasibility of the innovative mechanical design of S-STEP, a structural analysis considering launch and on-orbit environments is performed. In addition, development test results are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed design approach for VFOD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 4031 KiB  
Article
Recent Advances of the BIRALET System about Space Debris Detection
by Tonino Pisanu, Giacomo Muntoni, Luca Schirru, Pierluigi Ortu, Enrico Urru and Giorgio Montisci
Aerospace 2021, 8(3), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace8030086 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3315
Abstract
Space debris is internationally recognized as a planetary threat. Efforts to enhance the worldwide radar monitoring networks have been intensified in the last years. Among the new radars employed for the observations, one of the most promising is the Bistatic Radar for Low [...] Read more.
Space debris is internationally recognized as a planetary threat. Efforts to enhance the worldwide radar monitoring networks have been intensified in the last years. Among the new radars employed for the observations, one of the most promising is the Bistatic Radar for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Tracking (BIRALET), which employs the Sardinia Radio Telescope as a receiving segment. The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) has recently been proven to be a reliable instrument for space debris monitoring and, for this purpose, over the years has undergone some substantial modifications in order to be able to rise to the status of a fully functional radar receiver. However, an extensive measurement campaign, in order to assess the real potential of the radar, has never been done before. In this paper, the authors present the first real space debris measurement campaign of the SRT, made between December 2018 and October 2019 using the new dedicated channel of the P-band receiver. A total of 27 objects were correctly detected during this campaign, characterized by a radar cross section (RCS) interval between 0.13 and 13.4 m2 and a range interval between 459 and 1224 km. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Space: Advances in Space Science and Engineering)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop