Special Issue "Progress in Advanced Oxidation and Biological Processes for Treatment of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joo Hwa Tay
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada
Interests: aerobic granulation; biological wastewater treatment technology; water quality protection; water reuse
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. John Albino Dominic

Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Canada
Interests: oxidative processes for micro pollutants; photochemical treatment methods; development of analytical methods for micro-pollutants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past few decades, scientific understanding of water chemistry has progressed tremendously, leading to development of state-of-the-art wastewater and water treatment technologies. However, the quality of fresh water sources has continuously deteriorated around the globe, in both industrialized and developing countries. While traditional wastewater technologies are focused on removal of suspended solids, nutrients and bacteria, occurrence of hundreds of organic contaminants in wastewater and impacted urban surface waters. These new contaminants are synthetic or naturally occurring chemicals that are not commonly monitored in the environment, but which have the potential to enter the environment and cause known or suspected adverse ecological and (or) human health effects. Collectively referred as the "Emerging Contaminants" (ECs), these contaminants mostly originate from domestic use and occur in trace concentrations ranging from pico to micrograms per liter. ECs are recalcitrant to conventional wastewater treatment process and most of them remain unaffected leading to the contamination of receiving water. This scenario leads to the need for advanced wastewater treatment process capable of removing ECs to safe guard fresh water sources. 

This Special Issue will focus on wastewater technologies specifically developed for treatment of emerging contaminants in domestic wastewater. The issue will be a collection of various original studies and reviews evaluating the efficacy of existing technologies and novel treatment technologies for treatment of ECs. Fate of ECs during conventional wastewater treatment processes will also be included. The collection will also encompass investigations that address the issue ECs in municipal sludge and biosolids and their treatment.

Prof. Dr. Joo Hwa Tay
Dr. John Albino Dominic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ChemEngineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Emerging contaminants
  • Domestic wastewater
  • Municipal sludge
  • Biosolids
  • Advanced wastewater treatment
  • Biological processes
  • Integrated technologies
  • Chemical treatment
  • Advanced oxidative processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of O3 Dose on the O3/UV Treatment Process for the Removal of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Secondary Effluent
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3020053 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
A municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a melting pot of numerous pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) together with many other substances. The removal of PPCPs using advanced oxidation processes within a WWTP is one way to reduce the amount of PPCPs [...] Read more.
A municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is a melting pot of numerous pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) together with many other substances. The removal of PPCPs using advanced oxidation processes within a WWTP is one way to reduce the amount of PPCPs that potentially enter an aquatic environment. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the ozone (O3)/UV treatment process, especially, the effects of O3 dose and reaction time, on the removal of PPCPs in the secondary effluent of a WWTP. Experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale treatment process that consisted of two flow-through reactors connected in series. Each reactor was equipped with three 65 W lamps (UV65W). The experimental variables were ozone dosage (1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 mg L−1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT; 5 and 10 min). On the basis of the PPCP concentrations after O3/UV65W treatment and their limit of detection (LOD), 38 PPCPs detected in the secondary effluent were classified into 5 groups ranging from the category of “sensitive” to O3/UV65W or “unstable” in the O3/UV65W process to the category of “insensitive” to O3/UV65W or “very stable” in the O3/UV65W process. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Removal of the Recalcitrant Artificial Sweetener Sucralose and Its By-Products from Industrial Wastewater Using Microbial Reduction/Oxidation of Iron
ChemEngineering 2018, 2(3), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering2030037 - 18 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The wastewater of the industrial production of artificial sweetener sucralose contained an average 1100 mg/L of total organic carbon (TOC) with 2100 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand and 10 mg/L of biological oxygen demand. Biodegradability of the wastewater components was low due to [...] Read more.
The wastewater of the industrial production of artificial sweetener sucralose contained an average 1100 mg/L of total organic carbon (TOC) with 2100 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand and 10 mg/L of biological oxygen demand. Biodegradability of the wastewater components was low due to chlorinated organic substances. The combined chemical and biological treatment of this wastewater in the bioreactors with hematite iron ore removed up to 70% of TOC. About 20% of TOC was removed quickly by adsorption on iron ore particles, but adsorption/precipitation of others up to 50% of TOC was due to ferrous/ferric ions and hydroxides produced during microbial reduction and dissolution of iron ore. The calculated dosage of iron ore with 150 regeneration cycles could be 46.7 g/L of wastewater. Thus, the treatment of wastewater with iron ore and iron-reducing bacteria diminished the quantity of granulated activated carbon that is used in the treatment of sucralose production wastewater by up to 70%. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop