Special Issue "TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Anna Maria Ferrari

Department of Sciences and Methods for Engineering, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
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Interests: Life Cycle Assessment; sustainability; engineered nanomaterials; functionalized materials; inorganic synthesis
Guest Editor
Dr. Roberto Rosa

Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
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Interests: engineered nanomaterials; microwave inorganic synthesis; combustion synthesis; microwave processing of materials; environmental assessment of inorganic synthetic processes; microwave hydrothermal/solvothermal synthesis
Guest Editor
Dr. Martina Pini

University of Modena and Reggio Emilia - Department of Sciences and Methods for Engineering via Amendola, 2 - Padiglione Morselli 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Life Cycle Assessment, sustainability, nanotechnology, nanomaterials, environmental impact assessment, sustainable development, circular economy, cultural heritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of ChemEngineering, entitled “TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications” will focus on the publication of original manuscripts and critical reviews to advance the understanding of titanium dioxide or titania nanoparticles, which probably represent the most widely-investigated and applied inorganic materials, mainly due to their unique physicochemical properties. Industry is rapidly developing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) that are applied in an increasingly wide variety of consumer and industrial products. Thanks to the unique physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, it is possible to obtain innovative applications. Nanoparticles have novel properties (chemical, mechanical, optical, magnetic, etc.) compared to corresponding bulk materials, thanks to their small dimensions, which range approximately from 1 to 100 nm. Nanomaterials, and in particular nano TiO2, are currently being considered for use in modern technologies, with a huge range of applications, such as in medicine, electronics, building materials, commercial products and energy production. Design, synthesis and applications of nanotitania-based materials will be the focus of this Special Issue and particular attention will be given to contributions that will deal with aspects of sustainability in terms of lower impacts on the environment through the more efficient use of energy and resources.

Prof. Anna Maria Ferrari
Dr. Roberto Rosa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ChemEngineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • TiO2 nanoparticles
  • innovative synthesis
  • environmental assessment
  • new applications
  • green synthetic strategies
  • green chemistry
  • green engineering
  • process intensification

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium with Nanosized TiO2 in Presence of Formic Acid
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3020033
Received: 5 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 2 April 2019
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Abstract
Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were used for the photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium in the presence of formic acid. The photoreduction of Cr(VI) in the absence of formic acid was quite slow. When formic acid was added in the chromium [...] Read more.
Nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were used for the photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium in the presence of formic acid. The photoreduction of Cr(VI) in the absence of formic acid was quite slow. When formic acid was added in the chromium solution as the hole scavenger, a rapid photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) was observed, owing to the consumption of hole and the acceleration of the oxidation reaction. Furthermore, three commercial TiO2 nanoparticles (AEROXIDE® P25; Ishihara Sangyo ST-01; FUJIFILM Wako Pure Chemical Corp.) were evaluated for the photoactivity of reduction of Cr(VI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Sol-Gel Processes in Micro-Environments of Black Shale: Learning from the Industrial Production of Nanometer-Sized TiO2 Polymorphs
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3010028
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 March 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
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Abstract
Micro-environments in black shale are reactors for geochemical reactions that differ from the bulk scale. They occur in small isolated pores of several 10 s to 100 s of nanometers without or with limited ionic exchange by diffusion to the surrounding matrix. The [...] Read more.
Micro-environments in black shale are reactors for geochemical reactions that differ from the bulk scale. They occur in small isolated pores of several 10 s to 100 s of nanometers without or with limited ionic exchange by diffusion to the surrounding matrix. The example of the formation of titania polymorphs brookite (and anatase) in black shale demonstrates that pH < 4 of the pore waters or lower must prevail to enable dissolution of Ti-bearing precursors followed by the precipitation of these metastable solids. Comparably low pH is applied during the industrial production of nanometer-sized brookite or anatase by sol-gel methods. The process parameters during industrial production such as low pH, negative Eh, or low ionic strength (to promote agglomeration) allow a comparison with parameters during geochemical processes leading to titania formation in black shale. Sol-gel processes are suggested herein as key geochemical processes in micro-environments of black shale in order to understand the formation of single brookite crystals or agglomerates on a nanometer scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Multisensory Gas Chromatography for Field Analysis of Complex Gaseous Mixtures
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3010013
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 28 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
A novel approach to analysis of complex gaseous mixtures is presented. The approach is based on the utilization of a compact gas chromatograph in combination with an array of highly integrated and selective metal oxide (MOX) sensors. Thanks to the implementation of a [...] Read more.
A novel approach to analysis of complex gaseous mixtures is presented. The approach is based on the utilization of a compact gas chromatograph in combination with an array of highly integrated and selective metal oxide (MOX) sensors. Thanks to the implementation of a multisensory detector, the device collects multiple chromatograms in a single run. The sensors in the integrated MEMS platform are very distinct in their catalytic properties. Hence, the time separation by chromatographic column is complemented by catalytic separation by a multisensory detector. Furthermore, the device can perform the analysis in a broad range of concentrations, from ppb to hundreds of ppm. Low ppb and even sub-ppb levels of detection for some analytes were achieved. As a part of this effort, nanocomposite gas sensors were synthesized for selective detection of hydrogen sulfide, mercaptans, alcohols, ketones, and heavy hydrocarbons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3010007
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
Reduced graphene oxide has certain unique qualities that make them versatile for a myriad of applications. Unlike graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide is a conductive material and well suited for use in electrically conductive materials, such as solar cell devices. In this study, [...] Read more.
Reduced graphene oxide has certain unique qualities that make them versatile for a myriad of applications. Unlike graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide is a conductive material and well suited for use in electrically conductive materials, such as solar cell devices. In this study, we report on the synthesis of graphene oxide as well as the fabrication and characterization of dye-sensitized solar cells with a photoanode which is an amalgam of reduced graphene oxide and titanium dioxide. The synthesized reduced graphene oxide and the corresponding photoanode were fully characterized using Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Raman Spectrometry. The morphology of the sample was assessed using Atomic Force Microscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The photovoltaic characteristics were determined by photocurrent and photo-voltage measurements of the fabricated solar cells. The electrical impedances of both sets of devices were also evaluated. Overall, the solar to electric power efficiency of the device with reduced graphene oxide was observed to be higher (2.02%) than the device without the reduced graphene oxide (1.61%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications)
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