Special Issue "Advanced Functional Low-dimensional Materials and Their Applications"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (4 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Zafar Iqbal
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: carbon nanotubes and related materials; and their applications in smart coatings; nanoenergetics; nanocomposites; sensors; hydrogen storage; biofuel cells and solar cells
Prof. Dr. N.M. Ravindra Nuggehalli
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, USA
Interests: 2-D materials; device integration; electronic materials; energy; hydrogen production; magnetic fields and applications; optoelectronics; semiconductors; solar cells; thermoelectrics; 3-D printing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, there has been renewed and increasing interest in various forms of carbon. While graphene has drawn the attention of the materials science community, other two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as bismuthene, germanene, phosphorene, silicene, stanene and the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDCs – MX2, M = Mo, W etc., X = S, Se, Te) monolayers have arisen as a new class of materials with unique properties at the monolayer thickness. Their electrical, electronic and optical properties are of significant importance for a variety of applications in optoelectronics, such as light emitters, detectors, and photovoltaic devices. These materials have also opened new areas of application, such as serving as topological insulators, and will, therefore, be the focus of this Special Issue. Additionally, a few reviews dealing with related one-dimensional functional carbon, boron or silicon nanotubes/nanowires and their applications will also be considered to provide a wider perspective to the field of low-dimensional materials.

Prof. Dr. Zafar Iqbal
Prof. Dr. N.M. Ravindra Nuggehalli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Graphene
  • Bismuthene
  • Germanene
  • 2D metal dicalcogenides
  • One-dimensional functional nanomaterials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dry Reforming of Methane over a Ruthenium/Carbon Nanotube Catalyst
ChemEngineering 2020, 4(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering4010016 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, CH4 dry reforming was demonstrated on a novel microwave-synthesized ruthenium (Ru)/carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst. The catalyst was tested in an isothermal laboratory-packed bed reactor, with gas analysis by gas chromatography/thermal conductivity detection. The catalyst demonstrated excellent dry-reforming activity at [...] Read more.
In this study, CH4 dry reforming was demonstrated on a novel microwave-synthesized ruthenium (Ru)/carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst. The catalyst was tested in an isothermal laboratory-packed bed reactor, with gas analysis by gas chromatography/thermal conductivity detection. The catalyst demonstrated excellent dry-reforming activity at modest temperatures (773–973 K) and pressure (3.03 × 105 Pa). Higher reaction temperatures favored increased conversion of CH4 and CO2, and increased H2/CO product ratios. Slight coke deposition, estimated by carbon balance, was observed at higher temperatures and higher feed CH4/CO2. A robust global kinetic model composed of three reversible reactions—dry reforming, reverse water gas shift, and CH4 decomposition—simulates observed outlet species concentrations and reactant conversions using this Ru/CNT catalyst over the temperature range of this study. This engineering kinetic model for the Ru/CNT catalyst predicts a somewhat higher selectivity and yield for H2, and less for CO, in comparison to previously published results for a similarly prepared Pt_Pd/CNT catalyst from our group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Low-dimensional Materials and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Preconcentration of Pb with Aminosilanized Fe3O4 Nanopowders in Environmental Water Followed by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3030074 - 16 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A new preconcentration method to determine lead in environmental waters using the aminosilanized magnetite Fe3O4 powder sorbent has been developed. The preconcentration method was combined with electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and a graphite atomizer. Trace amount of sorbent [...] Read more.
A new preconcentration method to determine lead in environmental waters using the aminosilanized magnetite Fe3O4 powder sorbent has been developed. The preconcentration method was combined with electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and a graphite atomizer. Trace amount of sorbent (3 mg) could be applied into the preconcentration of Pb. According the preconcentration, the detection limits were 14 and 19 pg·mL−1 with bare and aminosilanized Fe3O4, respectively. The effect of interferent elements such as Al, Ca, Co, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, and Zn (1000 ng·mL−1 versus Pb 1 ng·mL−1) on the preconcentration of Pb using bare magnetite was evaluated, and some elements (Al, Ni, and Zn) were found to interfere with the Pb preconcentration. The aminosilanized Fe3O4 sorbent was found to be effective in eliminating the severe interferences. The enrichment factors were 34 for the preconcentration with aminosilanized Fe3O4. The recovery of spiked Pb in the case of the sorbent with aminosilanized Fe3O4 was in the range of 75 to 110%. From the analytical data, the preconcentration technique was found to be useful for the determination of trace lead in environmental waters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Low-dimensional Materials and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ion-Liquid Based Supercapacitors with Inner Gate Diode-Like Separators
ChemEngineering 2019, 3(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering3020039 - 14 Apr 2019
Abstract
In order to minimize unintentional discharge, supercapacitors are interfaced with a membrane that separates the anode from the cathode—this membrane is called the separator. We focus here on separators, which are structured as electronic diode-like. We call an electrically structured separator “the gate”. [...] Read more.
In order to minimize unintentional discharge, supercapacitors are interfaced with a membrane that separates the anode from the cathode—this membrane is called the separator. We focus here on separators, which are structured as electronic diode-like. We call an electrically structured separator “the gate”. Through experiments, it was demonstrated that ionic liquid-filled supercapacitors, which were interfaced with gated separators exhibited a substantial capacitance (C) increase and reduction in the equivalent series resistance (ESR) compared to cells with ordinary separators. These two attributes help to increase the energy, which is stored in a cell, since for a given cell’s voltage, the dissipated energy on the cell, UR = V2/4(ESR) and the stored energy, UC = CV2/2, would increase. These were indeed ionic diodes since the order of the diode layout mattered—the diode-like structures exhibited maximum capacitance when their p-side faced the auxiliary electrode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Low-dimensional Materials and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Transfer of Graphene with Protective Oxide Layers
ChemEngineering 2018, 2(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemengineering2040058 - 03 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Transfer of graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to a substrate of choice, typically involves the deposition of a polymeric layer (for example, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS). These polymers are quite hard to remove without leaving some residues behind. One [...] Read more.
Transfer of graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to a substrate of choice, typically involves the deposition of a polymeric layer (for example, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS). These polymers are quite hard to remove without leaving some residues behind. One method to improve the graphene transfer is to coat the graphene with a thin protective oxide layer, followed by the deposition of a very thin polymer layer on top of the oxide layer (much thinner than the usual thickness), followed by a more aggressive polymeric removal method, thus leaving the graphene intact. At the same time, having an oxide layer on graphene may serve applications, such as channeled transistors or sensing devices. Here, we study the transfer of graphene with a protective thin oxide layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We follow the transfer process from the graphene growth stage through oxide deposition until completion. We report on the nucleation growth process of oxides on graphene, their resultant strain and their optical transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Low-dimensional Materials and Their Applications)
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