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Multimodal Technologies Interact., Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2019)

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Open AccessArticle Participatory Research Principles in Human-Centered Design: Engaging Teens in the Co-Design of a Social Robot
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010008
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 18 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 10 February 2019
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Abstract
Social robots are emerging as an important intervention for a variety of vulnerable populations. However, engaging participants in the design of social robots in a way that is ethical, meaningful, and rigorous can be challenging. Many current methods in human–robotic interaction rely on [...] Read more.
Social robots are emerging as an important intervention for a variety of vulnerable populations. However, engaging participants in the design of social robots in a way that is ethical, meaningful, and rigorous can be challenging. Many current methods in human–robotic interaction rely on laboratory practices, often experimental, and many times involving deception which could erode trust in vulnerable populations. Therefore, in this paper, we share our human-centered design methodology informed by a participatory approach, drawing on three years of data from a project aimed to design and develop a social robot to improve the mental health of teens. We present three method cases from the project that describe creative and age appropriate methods to gather contextually valid data from a teen population. Specific techniques include design research, scenario and script writing, prototyping, and teens as operators and collaborative actors. In each case, we describe the method and its implementation and discuss the potential strengths and limitations. We conclude by situating these methods by presenting a set of recommended participatory research principles that may be appropriate for designing new technologies with vulnerable populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in User-Centered Interaction Design)
Open AccessArticle Affective Communication between ECAs and Users in Collaborative Virtual Environments: The REVERIE European Parliament Use Case
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010007
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 10 February 2019
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Abstract
This paper discusses the enactment and evaluation of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA) capable of affective communication in Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE) for learning. The CVE discussed is a reconstruction of the European Parliament in Brussels developed using the REVERIE (Real and Virtual Engagement [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the enactment and evaluation of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA) capable of affective communication in Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE) for learning. The CVE discussed is a reconstruction of the European Parliament in Brussels developed using the REVERIE (Real and Virtual Engagement In Realistic Immersive Environment) framework. REVERIE is a framework designed to support the creation of CVEs populated by ECAs capable of natural human-like behaviour, physical interaction and engagement. The ECA provides a tour of the virtual parliament and participates in the learning activity as an intervention mechanism to engage students. The ECA is capable of immediacy behaviour (verbal and non-verbal) and interactions to support a dialogic learning scenario. The design of the ECA is grounded on a theoretical framework that addresses the required characteristics of the ECA to successfully support collaborative learning. In this paper, we discuss the Heuristic Evaluation of the REVERIE ECA which revealed a wealth of usability problems that led to the development of a list of design recommendations to improve their usability, including its immediacy behaviours and interactions. An ECA capable of effectively creating rapport should result in more positive experiences for participants and better learning results for students in dialogic learning scenarios. Future work aims to evaluate this hypothesis in real-world scenarios with teachers and students participating in a shared virtual educational experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virtual, Augmented and Mixed Reality in Improving Education)
Open AccessArticle A Survey of Assistive Technologies for Assessment and Rehabilitation of Motor Impairments in Multiple Sclerosis
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010006
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 5 February 2019
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Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that affects the central nervous system, which consists of the brain and spinal cord. Although this condition cannot be cured, proper treatment of persons with MS (PwMS) can help control and manage the relapses of several symptoms. [...] Read more.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that affects the central nervous system, which consists of the brain and spinal cord. Although this condition cannot be cured, proper treatment of persons with MS (PwMS) can help control and manage the relapses of several symptoms. In this survey article, we focus on the different technologies used for the assessment and rehabilitation of motor impairments for PwMS. We discuss sensor-based and robot-based solutions for monitoring, assessment and rehabilitation. Among MS symptoms, fatigue is one of the most disabling features, since PwMS may need to put significantly more intense effort toward achieving simple everyday tasks. While fatigue is a common symptom across several neurological chronic diseases, it remains poorly understood for various reasons, including subjectivity and variability among individuals. To this end, we also investigate recent methods for fatigue detection and monitoring. The result of this survey will provide both clinicians and researchers with valuable information on assessment and rehabilitation technologies for PwMS, as well as providing insights regarding fatigue and its effect on performance in daily activities for PwMS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive Assistive Technology)
Open AccessArticle A Low-Cost Prototype for Driver Fatigue Detection
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010005
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 28 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
Driver fatigue and inattention accounts for up to 20% of all traffic accidents, therefore any system that can warn the driver whenever fatigue occurs proves to be useful. Several systems have been devised to detect driver fatigue symptoms, such as measuring physiological parameters, [...] Read more.
Driver fatigue and inattention accounts for up to 20% of all traffic accidents, therefore any system that can warn the driver whenever fatigue occurs proves to be useful. Several systems have been devised to detect driver fatigue symptoms, such as measuring physiological parameters, which can be uncomfortable, or using a video or infrared camera pointed at the driver’s face, which in some cases, may cause privacy concerns for the driver. Usually these systems are expensive, therefore a brief discussion on low-cost fatigue detection systems is presented, followed by a proposal for a non-intrusive low-cost prototype, that aims to detect driver fatigue symptoms. The prototype consists of several sensors that monitor driver physical parameters and vehicle behaviour, with a total system price close to 30 euros. The prototype is discussed and compared with similar systems, pointing out its strengths and weaknesses. Full article
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Open AccessPerspective Improving Human–Computer Interface Design through Application of Basic Research on Audiovisual Integration and Amplitude Envelope
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010004
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 18 January 2019 / Published: 22 January 2019
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Abstract
Quality care for patients requires effective communication amongst medical teams. Increasingly, communication is required not only between team members themselves, but between members and the medical devices monitoring and managing patient well-being. Most human–computer interfaces use either auditory or visual displays, and despite [...] Read more.
Quality care for patients requires effective communication amongst medical teams. Increasingly, communication is required not only between team members themselves, but between members and the medical devices monitoring and managing patient well-being. Most human–computer interfaces use either auditory or visual displays, and despite significant experimentation, they still elicit well-documented concerns. Curiously, few interfaces explore the benefits of multimodal communication, despite extensive documentation of the brain’s sensitivity to multimodal signals. New approaches built on insights from basic audiovisual integration research hold the potential to improve future human–computer interfaces. In particular, recent discoveries regarding the acoustic property of amplitude envelope illustrate that it can enhance audiovisual integration while also lowering annoyance. Here, we share key insights from recent research with the potential to inform applications related to human–computer interface design. Ultimately, this could lead to a cost-effective way to improve communication in medical contexts—with signification implications for both human health and the burgeoning medical device industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodal Medical Alarms)
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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of MTI in 2018
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010003
Published: 9 January 2019
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Abstract
Rigorous peer-review is the corner-stone of high-quality academic publishing [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle Living and Working in a Multisensory World: From Basic Neuroscience to the Hospital
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010002
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 31 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
The intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital is an environment subjected to ceaseless noise. Patient alarms contribute to the saturated auditory environment and often overwhelm healthcare providers with constant and false alarms. This may lead to alarm fatigue and prevent optimum patient [...] Read more.
The intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital is an environment subjected to ceaseless noise. Patient alarms contribute to the saturated auditory environment and often overwhelm healthcare providers with constant and false alarms. This may lead to alarm fatigue and prevent optimum patient care. In response, a multisensory alarm system developed with consideration for human neuroscience and basic music theory is proposed as a potential solution. The integration of auditory, visual, and other sensory output within an alarm system can be used to convey more meaningful clinical information about patient vital signs in the ICU and operating room to ultimately improve patient outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodal Medical Alarms)
Open AccessArticle Embodied Engagement with Narrative: A Design Framework for Presenting Cultural Heritage Artifacts
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010001
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
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Abstract
An increasing number of museum exhibits incorporate multi-modal technologies and interactions; yet these media divert visitors’ attention away from the cultural heritage artifacts on display. This paper proposes an overarching conceptual structure for designing tangible and embodied narrative interaction with cultural heritage artifacts [...] Read more.
An increasing number of museum exhibits incorporate multi-modal technologies and interactions; yet these media divert visitors’ attention away from the cultural heritage artifacts on display. This paper proposes an overarching conceptual structure for designing tangible and embodied narrative interaction with cultural heritage artifacts within a museum exhibit so that visitors can interact with them to comprehend their cultural context. The Tangible and Embodied Narrative Framework (TENF) consists of three spectra (diegetic vs. non-diegetic, internal vs. external, and ontological vs. exploratory) and, considering how different interactions map along these three spectra, can guide designers in the way they integrate digital media, narrative, and embodiment. In this paper, we examine interactive narrative scholarship, existing frameworks for tangible and embodied interactions, and tangible and embodied narrative projects. We then describe the design of the TENF and its application to the pilot project, Mapping Place, and to the case study project, Multi-Sensory Prayer Nuts. The findings indicate that embodied engagement with artifacts through a narrative role can help visitors (1) contextualize the meaning of artifacts and (2) make personalized connections to the artifacts. Based on this work, we suggest design recommendations for tailoring the use of the TENF in the cultural heritage domain: simulate cultural practices, associate visitors with cultural perspectives, and provide simultaneous digital feedback. We conclude by describing future directions for the research, which include generating other possible projects using the TENF; collaborating with other designers and museum professionals; and exploring applications of the TENF in museum spaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Embodied and Spatial Interaction)
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Multimodal Technologies Interact. EISSN 2414-4088 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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