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Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010002

Living and Working in a Multisensory World: From Basic Neuroscience to the Hospital

1
Department of Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, 1211 21st Avenue South, Medical Arts Building, Suite 422, Nashville, TN 37212, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Health and Society, Vanderbilt University, 1211 21st Avenue South, Medical Arts Building, Suite 422, Nashville, TN 37212, USA
3
Department of Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, 465 21st AvenueSouth, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
4
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Main Office Mailbox357270, T-471 Health Sciences Center, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
5
Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1211 21st Avenue South, Medical Arts Building, Suite 422, Nashville, TN 37212, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 31 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multimodal Medical Alarms)
Full-Text   |   PDF [325 KB, uploaded 18 January 2019]

Abstract

The intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital is an environment subjected to ceaseless noise. Patient alarms contribute to the saturated auditory environment and often overwhelm healthcare providers with constant and false alarms. This may lead to alarm fatigue and prevent optimum patient care. In response, a multisensory alarm system developed with consideration for human neuroscience and basic music theory is proposed as a potential solution. The integration of auditory, visual, and other sensory output within an alarm system can be used to convey more meaningful clinical information about patient vital signs in the ICU and operating room to ultimately improve patient outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: music perception; alarm fatigue; intensive care unit; auditory icons music perception; alarm fatigue; intensive care unit; auditory icons
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Burdick, K.; Courtney, M.; Wallace, M.T.; Baum Miller, S.H.; Schlesinger, J.J. Living and Working in a Multisensory World: From Basic Neuroscience to the Hospital. Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3, 2.

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