Special Issue "New Directions in User-Centered Interaction Design"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Berry Eggen

Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Multimodal interaction; intelligent systems; ambient intelligence; sound and lighting; remembering; decentralized systems
Guest Editor
Dr. Saskia Bakker

Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: tangible interaction; peripheral interaction; user centered design; calm technology; classroom technology
Guest Editor
Dr. Bart Hengeveld

Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: tangible interaction, embodied interaction; ambient intelligence; expressivity; personalisation; composition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advancements in the fields of human–computer interactions (HCI) and interaction design (IxD) co-evolve with developments in other disciplines. As both HCI and IxD are multi-disciplinary in nature, the new directions they explore are strongly influenced by state-of-the-art developments in the core disciplines they seek to integrate.

In this Special Issue, we want to focus on new user-centered methods and tools that support the design of interactive systems that are based on emergent technologies currently under development in the engineering disciplines. Of special interest are methods and tools based on contemporary insights and theories from the social and behavioral sciences.

Take for example, the rise of systems of smart things, or IoT as it is called nowadays. The shift from products to smart products and, more recently, from smart products to systems of smart things clearly puts new challenges to the field of interaction design. The same holds for emerging technologies like artificial intelligence (data analytics, smart things, etc.) or smart materials. However, also new insights in human attention management that inspire new interaction paradigms, like peripheral interaction or, to name a second example, recent understandings in how constructive processes in the brain work to inform application-oriented research on preference elicitation or, for example, everyday remembering.

To take full advantage of these developments, existing user-centered engineering methods and tools need to be adapted or new ones need to be developed to support the design of systems that truly make sense to people and that show a proper balance between advanced technological possibilities and the basic cognitive and social capabilities and needs of people.

Prof. Dr. Berry Eggen
Dr. Saskia Bakker
Dr. Bart Hengeveld
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • User-Centered
  • Interaction Design
  • Methods and Tools
  • Theories
  • Emerging technologies
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Participatory Research Principles in Human-Centered Design: Engaging Teens in the Co-Design of a Social Robot
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010008
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 18 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 10 February 2019
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Abstract
Social robots are emerging as an important intervention for a variety of vulnerable populations. However, engaging participants in the design of social robots in a way that is ethical, meaningful, and rigorous can be challenging. Many current methods in human–robotic interaction rely on [...] Read more.
Social robots are emerging as an important intervention for a variety of vulnerable populations. However, engaging participants in the design of social robots in a way that is ethical, meaningful, and rigorous can be challenging. Many current methods in human–robotic interaction rely on laboratory practices, often experimental, and many times involving deception which could erode trust in vulnerable populations. Therefore, in this paper, we share our human-centered design methodology informed by a participatory approach, drawing on three years of data from a project aimed to design and develop a social robot to improve the mental health of teens. We present three method cases from the project that describe creative and age appropriate methods to gather contextually valid data from a teen population. Specific techniques include design research, scenario and script writing, prototyping, and teens as operators and collaborative actors. In each case, we describe the method and its implementation and discuss the potential strengths and limitations. We conclude by situating these methods by presenting a set of recommended participatory research principles that may be appropriate for designing new technologies with vulnerable populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in User-Centered Interaction Design)
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Open AccessArticle A Phenomenological Framework of Architectural Paradigms for the User-Centered Design of Virtual Environments
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040080
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 19 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
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Abstract
In some circumstances, immersion in virtual environments with the aid of virtual reality (VR) equipment can create feelings of anxiety in users and be experienced as something “frightening”, “oppressive”, “alienating”, “dehumanizing”, or “dystopian”. Sometimes (e.g., in exposure therapy or VR gaming), a virtual [...] Read more.
In some circumstances, immersion in virtual environments with the aid of virtual reality (VR) equipment can create feelings of anxiety in users and be experienced as something “frightening”, “oppressive”, “alienating”, “dehumanizing”, or “dystopian”. Sometimes (e.g., in exposure therapy or VR gaming), a virtual environment is intended to have such psychological impacts on users; however, such effects can also arise unintentionally due to the environment’s poor architectural design. Designers of virtual environments may employ user-centered design (UCD) to incrementally improve a design and generate a user experience more closely resembling the type desired; however, UCD can yield suboptimal results if an initial design relied on an inappropriate architectural approach. This study developed a framework that can facilitate the purposeful selection of the most appropriate architectural approach by drawing on Norberg-Schulz’s established phenomenological account of real-world architectural modes. By considering the unique possibilities for structuring and experiencing space within virtual environments and reinterpreting Norberg-Schulz’s schemas in the context of virtual environment design, a novel framework was formulated that explicates six fundamental “architectural paradigms” available to designers of virtual environments. It was shown that the application of this framework could easily be incorporated as an additional step within the UCD process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in User-Centered Interaction Design)
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Review

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Open AccessReview An Overview of Participatory Design Applied to Physical and Digital Product Interaction for Older People
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040079
Received: 14 October 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
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Abstract
An understanding of the need for user-centred and participatory design continues to gain universal momentum both in academia and industry. It is essential this momentum is maintained as the population changes and technology develops. The contribution of this work draws on research from [...] Read more.
An understanding of the need for user-centred and participatory design continues to gain universal momentum both in academia and industry. It is essential this momentum is maintained as the population changes and technology develops. The contribution of this work draws on research from different disciplines to provide the design community with new knowledge and an awareness of the diversity of user needs, particularly the needs and skills of older people. A collection of usability and accessibility guidelines are referenced in terms of their applicability toward designing interfaces and interaction for an ageing population, in conjunction with results from studies that highlight the extent to which familiarity and successful interaction with contemporary products decreases according to age and prior experience, and identifies the problems users experience during interaction with technology. The hope is that more widespread awareness of this knowledge will encourage greater understanding and assist in the development of better design methods and better on- and offline products and tools for those of any age, but particularly those within an increasingly ageing demographic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Directions in User-Centered Interaction Design)
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