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Sport Experience and Physical Activity: Event-Related Brain Potential and Task Performance Indices of Attention in Young Adults

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Institute of Human and Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
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Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut 71515, Egypt
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Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut 71515, Egypt
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Faculty of Physical Education, Department of Physical Psychological and Education Sciences, Assiut University, Assiut 71515, Egypt
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020033
Received: 14 May 2019 / Revised: 2 June 2019 / Accepted: 2 June 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Importance of Physical Activity on Health)
A growing body of literature demonstrates that engaging in sport regularly and maintaining an active lifestyle have a positive impact on cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sport experiences and physical activity on attention, and explore whether the type of sport can impact differently on the neuroelectric system using Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). Thirty-three young adults (mean age = 19.72 ± 1.25) were divided according to their sport experience into swimmers, karateka, and irregular exercisers. Participants performed auditory oddball tasks, while measures of task performance and ERPs were collected. The results indicated that exercisers, regardless of their sport experience, exhibited a larger and shorter P3 compared to irregular exercisers. However, no significant difference was observed in the reaction time (RT) between groups. No statistically significant differences in the RT and P3 were present between swimmers and karateka. These findings suggest that sport experiences, regardless of the type, are associated with a larger amount of neural attentional resources and faster stimulus evaluation speed. The results replicate previous studies that have reported improved cognitive functions in more active individuals. They further extended the current knowledge by indicating that both swimming and karate influence attention and do not differentially alter the brain response. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; swimmers; karateka; ERP; P3 physical activity; swimmers; karateka; ERP; P3
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Aly, M.; A. Ahmed, M.; Hasan, A.; Kojima, H.; R. Abdelhakem, A. Sport Experience and Physical Activity: Event-Related Brain Potential and Task Performance Indices of Attention in Young Adults. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4, 33.

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