Special Issue "The Importance of Physical Activity on Health"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Exercise for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Badicu Georgian

Department of Physical Education and Special Motricity, Faculty of Physical Education and Mountain Sports, Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sports activities; health promotion; methodology; pedagogics; physical fitness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity (PA) is defined as every movement produced by the skeletal muscles that moves the body and subsequently leads to a considerable increase in the energy consumption. This is in contrast to a rest period, defined by a lack of activity or daily rest. An active lifestyle is known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and is associated with lower blood pressure. It can also enhance memory and controllability, improve the lipid profile and overall wellbeing, and relieve stress and anxiety [1]. The results of numerous studies have shown that a lack of PA is a serious threat to health [2, 3]. PA carries obvious benefits for health [4–6], as exercise is an important factor for a well-functioning body. The minimum weekly global PA health recommendation consists of 150 min of moderate-intensity aerobic PA, 75 min of vigorous-intensity aerobic PA, or an equivalent combination of moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity activities [7]. This Special Issue aims to demonstrate the importance of physical activity for people's health.

Dr. Badicu Georgian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • health
  • sport
  • lifestyle
  • wellbeing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Promoting Physical Exercise Participation: The Role of Interpersonal Behaviors for Practical Implications
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020040
Received: 7 May 2019 / Revised: 11 June 2019 / Accepted: 21 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
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Abstract
The number of people engaging in physical exercise has been decreasing every year. These behaviors are known to be related with non-communicable chronic diseases and to drastically increase premature morbidity and mortality. Since “the lack of motivation” has been pointed out as one [...] Read more.
The number of people engaging in physical exercise has been decreasing every year. These behaviors are known to be related with non-communicable chronic diseases and to drastically increase premature morbidity and mortality. Since “the lack of motivation” has been pointed out as one of the main reasons for not engaging in physical exercise, several theoretical and empirical studies have been conducted aimed at understanding what influences behavior regulation. According to literature, gym exercisers who perceive exercise instructors as supportive are more likely to maintain physical exercise participation over the long-run. Supporting autonomy, competence, and relatedness should be carefully considered when interacting with health club clients as a way to promote more autonomous motivation. Overall, it seems that exercise instructors should foster a supportive environment for gym exercisers, in order to encourage exercise as a habitual behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Importance of Physical Activity on Health)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Sport Experience and Physical Activity: Event-Related Brain Potential and Task Performance Indices of Attention in Young Adults
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020033
Received: 14 May 2019 / Revised: 2 June 2019 / Accepted: 2 June 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
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Abstract
A growing body of literature demonstrates that engaging in sport regularly and maintaining an active lifestyle have a positive impact on cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sport experiences and physical activity on attention, and explore whether [...] Read more.
A growing body of literature demonstrates that engaging in sport regularly and maintaining an active lifestyle have a positive impact on cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sport experiences and physical activity on attention, and explore whether the type of sport can impact differently on the neuroelectric system using Event-Related Potentials (ERPs). Thirty-three young adults (mean age = 19.72 ± 1.25) were divided according to their sport experience into swimmers, karateka, and irregular exercisers. Participants performed auditory oddball tasks, while measures of task performance and ERPs were collected. The results indicated that exercisers, regardless of their sport experience, exhibited a larger and shorter P3 compared to irregular exercisers. However, no significant difference was observed in the reaction time (RT) between groups. No statistically significant differences in the RT and P3 were present between swimmers and karateka. These findings suggest that sport experiences, regardless of the type, are associated with a larger amount of neural attentional resources and faster stimulus evaluation speed. The results replicate previous studies that have reported improved cognitive functions in more active individuals. They further extended the current knowledge by indicating that both swimming and karate influence attention and do not differentially alter the brain response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Importance of Physical Activity on Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Cardiac Rehabilitation in Primary Care. Impact of an Intervention on Perceived Self-Efficacy
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020032
Received: 9 May 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 31 May 2019 / Published: 1 June 2019
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Abstract
Cardiac rehabilitation is cost-effective and should be considered a part of the care system provided to patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction or another heart disease. The main variable to study was the scoring, prior to and after the intervention in the [...] Read more.
Cardiac rehabilitation is cost-effective and should be considered a part of the care system provided to patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction or another heart disease. The main variable to study was the scoring, prior to and after the intervention in the General Scale of Self-Efficacy by Baessler & Schwarzer. A clinical community trial that was open controlled and randomised was used. All adult subjects of both sexes who had completed a cardiac rehabilitation program for 12 months at the reference hospital were selected and offered to participate. The psychometric variables registered were the Salamanca screening questionnaire, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Eighty-nine subjects accepted to participate in the study (93.89% response rate), with an average age of 63.01 years (SD 8.75). Once the study was concluded, the main outcome was a difference in means of 6.09 points in the General Scale of Self-Efficacy (p < 0.0053, 96% confidence interval—4.1950–10.29), showing that the group exposed to the intervention reached a higher score in the above-mentioned scale. However, there were no significant differences (t-student 0.1211; p = 0.943) after the estimation and contrast of population means for score differences between the groups regarding the Hamilton scale. Similarly, there were no significant differences between the groups regarding the means obtained in the variable score difference in the Beck Depression Inventory (t-student −0.1281; p = 0.8987). The results showed an increase in those scores related to general self-efficacy among the population that completed the intervention program, as compared to the control group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Importance of Physical Activity on Health)
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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. EISSN 2411-5142 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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