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Publications, Volume 12, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 8 articles

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6 pages, 245 KiB  
Communication
Book Reviews in Medical History Journals
by Ka-wai Fan
Publications 2024, 12(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020017 - 22 May 2024
Viewed by 172
Abstract
This study explores the realm of book reviews within medical history journals, an area often overlooked in the existing literature. By scrutinizing four prominent journals over a five-year period, encompassing 780 book reviews, this research elucidates prevalent trends and patterns. Findings reveal disparities [...] Read more.
This study explores the realm of book reviews within medical history journals, an area often overlooked in the existing literature. By scrutinizing four prominent journals over a five-year period, encompassing 780 book reviews, this research elucidates prevalent trends and patterns. Findings reveal disparities in review volume and author demographics, underscored by English-language dominance. Challenges such as limited word counts and evaluation dynamics emerge as impediments to review quality. Proposed enhancements include relaxing word limits, conducting reader surveys, and fostering access to non-English literature. These strategies aim to invigorate scholarly discourse, enriching the landscape of medical history research. Full article
19 pages, 539 KiB  
Article
Research Data Management in the Croatian Academic Community: A Research Study
by Radovan Vrana
Publications 2024, 12(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020016 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 827
Abstract
This paper presents the results of an empirical research study of Croatian scientists’ use and management of research data. This research study was carried out from 28 June 2023 until 31 August 2023 using an online questionnaire consisting of 28 questions. The answers [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results of an empirical research study of Croatian scientists’ use and management of research data. This research study was carried out from 28 June 2023 until 31 August 2023 using an online questionnaire consisting of 28 questions. The answers of 584 respondents working in science were filtered out for further analysis. About three-quarters of the respondents used the research data of other scientists successfully. Research data were mostly acquired from colleagues from the same department or institution. Roughly half of the respondents did not ask other scientists directly for their research data. Research data are important to the respondents mostly for raising the quality of research. Repeating someone else’s research by using their research data is still a problem. Less than one-third of the respondents provided full access to their research data mostly due to their fear of misuse. The benefits of research data sharing were recognized but few of the respondents received any reward for it. Archiving research data is a significant problem for the respondents as they dominantly use their own computers prone to failure for that activity and do not think about long-term preservation. Finally, the respondents lacked deeper knowledge of research data management. Full article
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15 pages, 1634 KiB  
Article
Fostering Open Data Practices in Research-Performing Organizations
by Claire Jean-Quartier, Harald Kleinberger-Pierer, Barbara Zach, Ilire Hasani-Mavriqi, Lea Pešec and Clara Schmikl-Reiter
Publications 2024, 12(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020015 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 570
Abstract
Open data provide the scientific community and other stakeholders with unrestricted access to data. Open data serve as a foundation for reproducing research findings, while also facilitating collaboration and enabling novel discoveries. However, open data practices are still not commonly applied. To contribute [...] Read more.
Open data provide the scientific community and other stakeholders with unrestricted access to data. Open data serve as a foundation for reproducing research findings, while also facilitating collaboration and enabling novel discoveries. However, open data practices are still not commonly applied. To contribute to the implementation of open data strategy in academia in Austria and beyond, a collection of local strategies from regional universities and higher education institutions in the Austrian provinces of Styria and Carinthia was compiled through workshop-based discussions between participants from research support service units at research-performing organizations. The collection was further organized into categories based on application time scenarios, target groups, and involved parties, as well as corresponding thematic focus. A strategic guide consisting of various measures has been developed to encourage the adoption of open data practices from an organizational standpoint. Designed for adaptability, it aims to be applicable and modifiable by all interested research and higher education institutions, regardless of their priorities and resources. Our guideline aids research organizations in crafting a tailored strategy to enhance their data dissemination practices, thereby increasing their research visibility and impact. Full article
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19 pages, 3527 KiB  
Article
Research on Disinformation in Academic Studies: Perspectives through a Bibliometric Analysis
by Nuria Navarro-Sierra, Silvia Magro-Vela and Raquel Vinader-Segura
Publications 2024, 12(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020014 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 471
Abstract
Disinformation is a phenomenon of concern to all political systems, as it poses a threat to freedom and democracy through the manipulation of public opinion aimed at eroding institutions. This paper presents a bibliometric and systematized study which allows the establishment of a [...] Read more.
Disinformation is a phenomenon of concern to all political systems, as it poses a threat to freedom and democracy through the manipulation of public opinion aimed at eroding institutions. This paper presents a bibliometric and systematized study which allows the establishment of a comprehensive view of the research and current state of academic investigations on disinformation. To this end, a content analysis of the scientific articles indexed in Scopus up to 31 December 2023 has been carried out based on three categories of analysis: journals, authors and investigations. Similarly, a systematic study of the 50 most cited articles in this sample was performed in order to gain a deeper understanding of the nature, motivations and methodological approaches of these investigations. The results indicate that disinformation is a research topic which has gained great interest in the academic community since 2018, with special mention to the impact of COVID-19 and the vaccines against this disease. Thus, it can be concluded that disinformation is an object of study which attracts significant attention and which must be approached from transdisciplinarity to respond to a phenomenon of great complexity. Full article
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10 pages, 1810 KiB  
Article
The Time from Submission to Publication in Primary Health Care Journals: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Tsung-An Chen, Ming-Hwai Lin, Yu-Chun Chen and Tzeng-Ji Chen
Publications 2024, 12(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020013 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Background: The time from submission to publication can significantly impact the speed of knowledge dissemination and is influenced by multiple factors. This research aims to investigate the time from submission to publication of journals of primary health care and to explore the factors [...] Read more.
Background: The time from submission to publication can significantly impact the speed of knowledge dissemination and is influenced by multiple factors. This research aims to investigate the time from submission to publication of journals of primary health care and to explore the factors that influence this duration. Methods: We selected journals of primary health care and extracted their impact factors, annual publication frequencies, and open access status. The time from submission to acceptance (SA lag), acceptance to publication (AP lag), and submission to publication (SP lag) were calculated. Additionally, we conducted statistical analyses to determine whether impact factors, annual publication frequencies, and journal open access status had an influence on publication time. Results: This study revealed the average SP lag was 243.4 days (interquartile range, IQR 159–306), the average SA lag was 177.8 days (IQR 99–229.3), and the average AP lag was 65.6 days (IQR 14–101). Variations were observed in SP lag, SA lag, and AP lag among different journals. SP lag generally decreased with higher impact factors. Journals with open access had longer SA lag but shorter AP lag. There was a general trend of decreasing SP lag and SA lag with an increasing number of annual publications, but no clear trend was observed for AP lag. Conclusions: Improvements are needed in reducing the duration from submission to publication for primary health care journals. Significant variation exists among journals. Additionally, factors such as the impact factor, open access status, and the number of annual publications may influence publication speed. Full article
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30 pages, 1479 KiB  
Article
Coping with the Inequity and Inefficiency of the H-Index: A Cross-Disciplinary Empirical Analysis
by Fabio Zagonari and Paolo Foschi
Publications 2024, 12(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020012 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1326
Abstract
This paper measures two main inefficiency features (many publications other than articles; many co-authors’ reciprocal citations) and two main inequity features (more co-authors in some disciplines; more citations for authors with more experience). It constructs a representative dataset based on a cross-disciplinary balanced [...] Read more.
This paper measures two main inefficiency features (many publications other than articles; many co-authors’ reciprocal citations) and two main inequity features (more co-authors in some disciplines; more citations for authors with more experience). It constructs a representative dataset based on a cross-disciplinary balanced sample (10,000 authors with at least one publication indexed in Scopus from 2006 to 2015). It estimates to what extent four additional improvements of the H-index as top-down regulations (∆Hh = Hh − Hh+1 from H1 = based on publications to H5 = net per-capita per-year based on articles) account for inefficiency and inequity across twenty-five disciplines and four subjects. Linear regressions and ANOVA results show that the single improvements of the H-index considerably and decreasingly explain the inefficiency and inequity features but make these vaguely comparable across disciplines and subjects, while the overall improvement of the H-index (H1–H5) marginally explains these features but make disciplines and subjects clearly comparable, to a greater extent across subjects than disciplines. Fitting a Gamma distribution to H5 for each discipline and subject by maximum likelihood shows that the estimated probability densities and the percentages of authors characterised by H5 ≥ 1 to H5 ≥ 3 are different across disciplines but similar across subjects. Full article
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14 pages, 1435 KiB  
Article
Application of ChatGPT in Information Literacy Instructional Design
by Jelena Madunić and Matija Sovulj
Publications 2024, 12(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020011 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1721
Abstract
Recent developments in generative artificial intelligence tools have prompted immediate reactions in the academic library community. While most studies focus on the potential impact on academic integrity, this work explored constructive applications of ChatGPT in the design of instructional materials for courses in [...] Read more.
Recent developments in generative artificial intelligence tools have prompted immediate reactions in the academic library community. While most studies focus on the potential impact on academic integrity, this work explored constructive applications of ChatGPT in the design of instructional materials for courses in academic information literacy. The starting point was the use of openly licenced information resources or content infrastructure as facilitators in the creation of educational materials. In the first phase, course teaching material was developed using a prompt engineering strategy, predefined standards, and a prompt script. As a second step, we experimented with designing a custom chatbot model connected to a pre-defined corpus of source documents. The results demonstrated that the final teaching material required careful revision and optimisation before use in an actual instructional programme. The experimental design of the custom chatbot was able to query specific user-defined documents. Taken together, these findings suggest that the strategic and well-planned use of ChatGPT technology in content creation can have substantial benefits in terms of time and cost efficiency. In the context of information literacy, the results provide a practical and innovative solution to integrate the new technology tool into instructional practices. Full article
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12 pages, 931 KiB  
Article
In-Depth Examination of Coverage Duration: Analyzing Years Covered and Skipped in Journal Indexing
by Eungi Kim
Publications 2024, 12(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications12020010 - 1 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1577
Abstract
Journals that have consistently maintained uninterrupted indexing over an extended period can be assumed to possess stability and sustainability in journal indexing. Building on this assumption, the objective of this study is to scrutinize the years omitted in the indexing of Scopus-indexed journals. [...] Read more.
Journals that have consistently maintained uninterrupted indexing over an extended period can be assumed to possess stability and sustainability in journal indexing. Building on this assumption, the objective of this study is to scrutinize the years omitted in the indexing of Scopus-indexed journals. To conduct this study, three coverage duration indicators—nyears-covered (total years covered), nyears-skipped (years skipped), and skipped/covered ratio (proportion of years skipped to total years covered)—were formulated. Data from SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) for 2022, consisting of 16,762 records (62% of downloaded data) with a coverage duration of 25 years or less, were used for this study. The results revealed that around 10% of Scopus-indexed journals experienced exclusions or coverage gaps. Longer coverage correlates positively with documents published, h-index, and citations, while skipped years decrease with these indicators. Open access (OA) journals exhibited a lower skipped/covered ratio than non-OA journals, suggesting a better sustainability of indexing than non-OA journals. Disciplinary differences in Scopus journal coverage duration revealed notable variation, suggesting that coverage duration indicators can be effectively used to evaluate journal stability within Scopus. Overall, the coverage gaps reflect Scopus’s efforts to regulate the journals it indexes. The coverage duration indicators proposed in this study can be applied to assess the stability of periodicals in any database, providing insights into the broader dynamics and quality standards maintained by a database, where the database periodically adds and removes its indexed contents. Full article
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