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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Selenium and Copper Nanoparticles on Yield, Antioxidant System, and Fruit Quality of Tomato Plants

1
Instituto de Agroingeniería, Universidad del Papaloapan, Loma Bonita, Oaxaca 68400, Mexico
2
Maestría en Ciencias en Horticultura, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Coahuila 25315, Mexico
3
Centro de Investigación en Química Aplicada, Saltillo, Coahuila 25294, Mexico
4
Instituto de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Tulancingo, Hidalgo 43600, Mexico
5
Departamento de Horticultura, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Coahuila 25315, Mexico
6
Departamento de Botánica, Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Coahuila 25315, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(10), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100355
Received: 31 August 2019 / Revised: 16 September 2019 / Accepted: 18 September 2019 / Published: 20 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selenium Metabolism and Accumulation in Plants)
The effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on plants are contrasting; these depend on the model plant, the synthesis of the nanoparticles (concentration, size, shape), and the forms of application (foliar, substrate, seeds). For this reason, the objective of this study was to report the impact of different concentrations of selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) NPs on yield, antioxidant capacity, and quality of tomato fruit. The different concentrations of Se and Cu NPs were applied to the substrate every 15 days (five applications). The yield was determined until day 102 after the transplant. Non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant compounds were determined in the leaves and fruits as well as the fruit quality at harvest. The results indicate that tomato yield was increased by up to 21% with 10 mg L−1 of Se NPs. In leaves, Se and Cu NPs increased the content of chlorophyll, vitamin C, glutathione, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazolin-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and phenylalanine ammonia liasa (PAL). In fruits, they increased vitamin C, glutathione, flavonoids, firmness, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity. The combination of Se and Cu NPs at optimal concentrations could be a good alternative to improve tomato yield and quality, but more studies are needed to elucidate their effects more clearly. View Full-Text
Keywords: nanoparticles; Cu NPs; Se NPs; enzymatic compounds; antioxidants; chlorophyll; lycopene nanoparticles; Cu NPs; Se NPs; enzymatic compounds; antioxidants; chlorophyll; lycopene
MDPI and ACS Style

Hernández-Hernández, H.; Quiterio-Gutiérrez, T.; Cadenas-Pliego, G.; Ortega-Ortiz, H.; Hernández-Fuentes, A.D.; Cabrera de la Fuente, M.; Valdés-Reyna, J.; Juárez-Maldonado, A. Impact of Selenium and Copper Nanoparticles on Yield, Antioxidant System, and Fruit Quality of Tomato Plants. Plants 2019, 8, 355.

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