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Cosmetics, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2015) – 6 articles , Pages 1-47

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Article
Effects of Lipids and Emulsifiers on the Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Cosmetic Emulsions Containing Vitamin E
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 35-47; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010035 - 18 Mar 2015
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5114
Abstract
Sensory properties are fundamental in determining the success of a cosmetic product. In this work, we assessed the influence of different oils and emulsifiers on the physicochemical and sensory properties of anti-ageing cosmetic O/W emulsions containing vitamin E acetate as active ingredient. No [...] Read more.
Sensory properties are fundamental in determining the success of a cosmetic product. In this work, we assessed the influence of different oils and emulsifiers on the physicochemical and sensory properties of anti-ageing cosmetic O/W emulsions containing vitamin E acetate as active ingredient. No clear correlation between physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics was evidenced. Sensorial evaluation of these formulations pointed out that the emulsifier systems affected the perceived oiliness and absorbency during application of the product, thus influencing its acceptance. These results suggest the need for more detailed studies on the physicochemical factors involved in determining the consumers’ acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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Editorial
Open Peer Review: A New Challenge for Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 33-34; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010033 - 09 Mar 2015
Viewed by 4341
Abstract
Dear Readers, As part of a continued effort to improve the quality of our papers and the transparency of the publication process, Cosmetics will introduce in the near future the possibility for the Authors to choose an Open Peer Review process (OPR). OPR [...] Read more.
Dear Readers, As part of a continued effort to improve the quality of our papers and the transparency of the publication process, Cosmetics will introduce in the near future the possibility for the Authors to choose an Open Peer Review process (OPR). OPR is as a process in which the names of the authors and reviewers may be known to each other, and where review reports are published alongside the final manuscript, with the aim to facilitate discussion and clarity between the authors and the reviewer(s). Full article
Review
New Cosmetic Contact Allergens
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 22-32; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010022 - 04 Feb 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5815
Abstract
Allergic and photo-allergic contact dermatitis, and immunologic contact urticaria are potential immune-mediated adverse effects from cosmetics. Fragrance components and preservatives are certainly the most frequently observed allergens; however, all ingredients must be considered when investigating for contact allergy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What Do You Know about Cosmetics?)
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Editorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Cosmetics in 2014
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010021 - 08 Jan 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2721
Abstract
The editors of Cosmetics would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2014:[...] Full article
Review
Hormetins as Novel Components of Cosmeceuticals and Aging Interventions
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 11-20; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010011 - 06 Jan 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4199
Abstract
A promising strategy for maintaining a healthy and youthful phenotype during aging is that of mild stress-induced beneficial hormesis. The basis of hormesis lies in the molecular pathways of stress response, which are essential for the survival of a biological system by activation [...] Read more.
A promising strategy for maintaining a healthy and youthful phenotype during aging is that of mild stress-induced beneficial hormesis. The basis of hormesis lies in the molecular pathways of stress response, which are essential for the survival of a biological system by activation of maintenance and repair mechanisms in response to stress. Moderate physical exercise is the best example of a hormetin that brings about a wide range of health beneficial hormesis by first challenging the system. Similarly, other natural and synthetic hormetins can be incorporated in cosmeceutical formulations, and can help achieve benefits including maintenance of the skin structure and function. Several polyphenols, flavonoids and other components from spices, algae and other sources are potential hormetins that may act via hormesis. Stress response pathways that can be analyzed for screening potential hormetins for use in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals include heat shock response, autophagy, DNA damage response, sirtuin response, inflammatory response and oxidative stress response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue What Do You Know about Cosmetics?)
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Article
Green Polymers in Personal Care Products: Rheological Properties of Tamarind Seed Polysaccharide
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 1-10; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics2010001 - 23 Dec 2014
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 6240
Abstract
Tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) is a xyloglucan of vegetable origin, recently proposed for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical market as a “green” alternative to hyaluronic acid. In this study, TSP water dispersions, at different concentrations, were characterized by means of rheological measurements, both in [...] Read more.
Tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) is a xyloglucan of vegetable origin, recently proposed for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical market as a “green” alternative to hyaluronic acid. In this study, TSP water dispersions, at different concentrations, were characterized by means of rheological measurements, both in continuous and oscillatory flow conditions. The results were compared with those of hyaluronic acid of two different molecular weights. The results pointed out the close rheological behaviors between TSP and hyaluronic acid with comparable molecular weight. Afterwards, the structural features of binary and ternary polysaccharide associations prepared with TSP, hyaluronic acid (very high MW) and dehydropolysaccharide gum, a modified xanthan gum, with high stabilizing properties, were investigated. The rheological properties were significantly affected by the polysaccharide ratios in the mixture, suggesting that the combination of TSP with other polymers can lead to a modulation of the texture and functional properties of cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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