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Fibers, Volume 8, Issue 3 (March 2020) – 2 articles

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Cover Story (view full-size image) DMD map of the new silica laser-optimized multimode optical fiber with an extremely enlarged core [...] Read more.
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Cooling Methods on the Behavior of Reactive Powder Concrete Exposed to Fire Flame Effect
Fibers 2020, 8(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib8030019 - 20 Mar 2020
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Abstract
The construction of highly safe and durable buildings that can bear accident damage risks including fire, earthquake, impact, and more, can be considered to be the most important goal in civil engineering technology. An experimental investigation was prepared to study the influence of [...] Read more.
The construction of highly safe and durable buildings that can bear accident damage risks including fire, earthquake, impact, and more, can be considered to be the most important goal in civil engineering technology. An experimental investigation was prepared to study the influence of adding various percentages 0%, 1.0%, and 1.5% of micro steel fiber volume fraction (Vf) to reactive powder concrete (RPC)—whose properties are compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, and absorbed energy—after the exposure to fire flame of various burning temperatures 300, 400, and 500 °C using gradual-, foam-, and sudden-cooling methods. The outcomes of this research proved that the maximum reduction in mechanical properties is detected in case of 0% addition at burning temperature of 500 °C using sudden cooling to be 63.90%, 55.77% and 53.8% for compressive, splitting tensile, and flexural strength, respectively, while using 1.5% produced a modification in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and flexural strength to 6.67%, 4.15%, and 7.00% respectively, and 7.10 kN·mm for the absorbed energy for gradual cooling at 300 °C. From the results, the adopted cooling methods can be ordered according to their negative influence by sudden, foam, and gradual, while the optimum percentage of (Vf) is 1.5% when burning at 300 °C for all methods of cooling. 1.0% is considered the optimum percentage for all burning temperatures that exceed 400 °C using sudden-cooling method. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
New Silica Laser-Optimized Multimode Optical Fibers with Extremely Enlarged 100-μm Core Diameter for Gigabit Onboard and Industrial Networks
Fibers 2020, 8(3), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib8030018 - 17 Mar 2020
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Abstract
We present new type of silica graded index laser-optimized multimode optical fibers (LOMF) with extremely enlarged core diameter up to 100 μm and “typical” “telecommunication” cladding diameter 125 μm. This optical fiber was designed for harsh environment Gigabit onboard cable systems and industrial [...] Read more.
We present new type of silica graded index laser-optimized multimode optical fibers (LOMF) with extremely enlarged core diameter up to 100 μm and “typical” “telecommunication” cladding diameter 125 μm. This optical fiber was designed for harsh environment Gigabit onboard cable systems and industrial networks. It differs by special optimized graded refractive index profile, providing low differential mode delay (DMD) for selected guided modes. We present some results of tests, performed for manufactured pilot 520 m length of described LOMF 100/125, concerned with its geometry properties as well as key transmission parameters—attenuation and DMD map. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fibers as a Key Element of Distributed Sensor Systems)
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