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Open AccessArticle

Microorganisms and Biostimulants Impact on the Antioxidant Activity of Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Sprouts

1
Department of Agroecology and Crop Production, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Mickiewicza 21, 31120 Krakow, Poland
2
Department of Monogastric Animal Sciences, Division of Animal Nutrition and Food, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, 29 Klemensa Janickiego Street, 71270 Szczecin, Poland
3
The Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Niezapominajek 21, 30239 Krakow, Poland
4
Department of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, Medical College, Jagiellonian University, Medyczna 9, 30688 Krakow, Poland
5
Department of Microbiology and Biomonitoring, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Mickiewicza 21, 31120 Krakow, Poland
6
Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical College, Jagiellonian University, Medyczna 9, 30688 Krakow, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(7), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9070584
Received: 5 June 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 1 July 2020 / Published: 4 July 2020
The study analyzes the influence of plant growth promoters and biological control agents on the chemical composition and antioxidant activity (AA) in the sprouts of buckwheat. The AA of cv. Kora sprouts was higher than cv. Panda, with 110.0 µM Fe2+/g (FRAP—Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power), 52.94 µM TRX (Trolox)/g (DPPH—1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl), 182.7 µM AAE (Ascorbic Acid Equivalent)/g (Photochemiluminescence—PCL—ACW—Water-Soluble Antioxidant Capacity) and 1.250 µM TRX/g (PCL—ACL—Lipid-Soluble Antioxidant Capacity). The highest AA was found in the sprouts grown from seeds soaked in Ecklonia maxima extract and Pythium oligandrum (121.31 µM Fe2+/g (FRAP), 56.33 µM TRX/g (DPPH), 195.6 µM AAE/g (PCL—ACW) and 1.568 µM TRX/g (PCL—ACL). These values show that the antioxidant potential of buckwheat sprouts is essentially due to the predominant hydrophilic fraction of antioxidants. The AA of the sprouts was strongly correlated with total polyphenol content. View Full-Text
Keywords: antioxidant activity; Bacillus subtilis; buckwheat sprouts; Ecklonia maxima; natural nitrophenols; Pythium oligandrum antioxidant activity; Bacillus subtilis; buckwheat sprouts; Ecklonia maxima; natural nitrophenols; Pythium oligandrum
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Witkowicz, R.; Biel, W.; Skrzypek, E.; Chłopicka, J.; Gleń-Karolczyk, K.; Krupa, M.; Prochownik, E.; Galanty, A. Microorganisms and Biostimulants Impact on the Antioxidant Activity of Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Sprouts. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 584.

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