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Arts, Volume 8, Issue 1 (March 2019)

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Open AccessArticle Art, Maths, Electronics and Micros: The Late Work of Stan Ostoja-Kotkowski
Arts 2019, 8(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010023 (registering DOI)
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
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Abstract
To date, most work on computers in art has focused on the Algorists (1960s–) and on later cyber arts (1990s–). The use of microcomputers is an underexplored area, with the 1980s constituting a particular gap in the knowledge. This article considers the case [...] Read more.
To date, most work on computers in art has focused on the Algorists (1960s–) and on later cyber arts (1990s–). The use of microcomputers is an underexplored area, with the 1980s constituting a particular gap in the knowledge. This article considers the case of Polish-Australian artist, Stan Ostoja-Kotkowski (b. 1922, d. 1994), who after early exposure to computers at the Bell Labs (1967), returned to microcomputers late in his life. He was not a programmer yet used micros in his practice from the early 1980s, first a BBC in his BP Christmas Star commission, and later a 32-bit Archimedes. This he used from 1989 until his death to produce still images with a fractal generator and the ‘paintbox’ program, “Photodesk”. Drawing on archival research and interviews, we focus on three examples of how Ostoja deployed his micro, highlighting the convergence of art, maths, electronics, and a ‘hands-on’ tinkering ethic in his practice. We argue that when considering the history of creative microcomputing, it is imperative to go beyond the field of art itself. In this case, electronics and the hobbyist computing scenes provide crucial contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Born Digital Cultural Histories)
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Open AccessArticle Communication Machines as Art
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
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Abstract
The paper presents a personal history of making machines as artworks. The particular kind of art machines that have been made since around 1970 are communication machines: ones that enable humans to interact with each other. However, they do not provide communication in [...] Read more.
The paper presents a personal history of making machines as artworks. The particular kind of art machines that have been made since around 1970 are communication machines: ones that enable humans to interact with each other. However, they do not provide communication in the normal sense, but use a small bandwidth for relatively complex connections, making the experience of the interactions the art experience. The paper concludes by explaining how it later became possible to use computer networking and the Internet to make artworks that were more complex and, in part, autonomous generative machines whilst retaining the earlier communication machine functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
Open AccessArticle On Glass, in Glass, of Glass: Some Developments in the Combination of Glass and Printmaking
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
This paper considers some examples of creative glass practice and research at the ‘overlap’ of two distinct sectors of art and design—‘glassmaking’ and ‘printmaking’. The unique properties of glass mean that printed imagery can be applied on the glass surface, encapsulated within the [...] Read more.
This paper considers some examples of creative glass practice and research at the ‘overlap’ of two distinct sectors of art and design—‘glassmaking’ and ‘printmaking’. The unique properties of glass mean that printed imagery can be applied on the glass surface, encapsulated within the glass form and can even be made of glass. Case studies are given relating to each of these areas. In particular, the article offers some reflections on the development of glass and print over the last twenty or so years. These reflections are based on the author’s perspectives as an artist, teacher, and researcher. Following a historical overview, case studies are given on the work of Kevin Petrie, Rachel Welford, Miyoung Jung, Jeffrey Sarmiento, and Kathryn Wightman. All of these makers are associated with the Glass and Ceramics Department of the University of Sunderland, UK, based in National Glass Centre, but all have made wider impacts beyond the UK. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
Open AccessArticle Blurred Boundaries: Ethnofiction and Its Impact on Postwar Japanese Cinema
Received: 24 December 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
This article explores the use of ethnofiction, a technique emerging from the field of visual anthropology, which blends documentary and fiction filmmaking for ethnographic purposes. From Imamura Shōhei’s A Man Vanishes (Ningen jōhatsu, 1967) to Hou Hsiao Hsien’s Cafe Lumieré ( [...] Read more.
This article explores the use of ethnofiction, a technique emerging from the field of visual anthropology, which blends documentary and fiction filmmaking for ethnographic purposes. From Imamura Shōhei’s A Man Vanishes (Ningen jōhatsu, 1967) to Hou Hsiao Hsien’s Cafe Lumieré (Kōhi jikō, 2003), Japanese cinema, including Japan-set and Japan-associated cinema, has employed ethnofiction filmmaking techniques to alternately exploit and circumvent the structural barriers to filmmaking found in everyday life. Yet the dominant understanding in Japanese visual ethnography positions ethnofiction as an imported genre, reaching Japan through Jean Rouch and French cinema-verité. Blending visual analysis of Imamura and Hou’s ethnofiction films with an auto-ethnographic account of my own experience of four years of visual anthropology in Kansai, I interrogate the organizational barriers constructed around geographical perception and genre definition to argue for ethnofiction as a filmmaking technique that simultaneously emerged in French cinema-verité and Japanese feature filmmaking of the 1960s. Blurring the boundaries between Japanese, French, and East Asian co-production films, and between documentary and fiction genres, allows us to understand ethnofiction as a truly global innovation, with certain regional specificities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Japanese Documentary Film)
Open AccessArticle Makers Marks: Capturing, Preserving, and Sharing the Sounds of Glassmaking
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 30 January 2019
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Abstract
The Makers Marks Collaborative, an international team of glass artists, visual designers, composers, and engineers, embarked on a project together from 2015–2016 to use the glassmaking studio as a staging ground for interdisciplinary, collaborative making. The team aimed to capture and preserve the [...] Read more.
The Makers Marks Collaborative, an international team of glass artists, visual designers, composers, and engineers, embarked on a project together from 2015–2016 to use the glassmaking studio as a staging ground for interdisciplinary, collaborative making. The team aimed to capture and preserve the sounds of traditional studio glassmaking, and then to share them outside the workshop domain through digital technologies and glass art objects. The goal was also to fulfill a public engagement grant from the Royal Academy of Engineering to highlight the engineering through the art and the engineers’ vision within the art making. The team recorded and isolated the unique sounds of the glassblowing process and its studio environment, and then used the resulting digital sound collection as the foundation for developing artistic outputs: a virtual instrument library, a glass object-instrument of performance, a series of glass objects translating selected virtual instruments, and a music composition. They questioned the nature and materiality of glass through dialogue between media and conversation among team members, while exploring the practice-based research question: “How can we embed our recorded sounds of the glassmaking process back into the glass itself?” This paper focuses on the collaborative, interdisciplinary making process of the team, the project outputs, and the metaphorical language that was a key process facilitation tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle From the Application of Printings to Metal Inclusions in Glass: Development of Techniques
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper introduces the author’s practice-based research and the developed pioneering methods of application of printing inclusions and metal inclusions in glass. It also describes and examines the problems occurring during the application of printing and metal inclusions in glass and presents methods [...] Read more.
This paper introduces the author’s practice-based research and the developed pioneering methods of application of printing inclusions and metal inclusions in glass. It also describes and examines the problems occurring during the application of printing and metal inclusions in glass and presents methods for the selection of suitable materials and techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Survival Research Laboratories: A Dystopian Industrial Performance Art
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper examines the leading role played by the American mechanical performance group Survival Research Laboratories (SRL) within the field of machine art during the late 1970s and early 1980s, and as organized under the headings of (a) destruction/survival; (b) the cyborg as [...] Read more.
This paper examines the leading role played by the American mechanical performance group Survival Research Laboratories (SRL) within the field of machine art during the late 1970s and early 1980s, and as organized under the headings of (a) destruction/survival; (b) the cyborg as a symbol of human/machine interpenetration; and (c) biomechanical sexuality. As a manifestation of the era’s “industrial” culture, moreover, the work of SRL artists Mark Pauline and Eric Werner was often conceived in collaboration with industrial musicians like Monte Cazazza and Graeme Revell, and all of whom shared a common interest in the same influences. One such influence was the novel Crash by English author J. G. Ballard, and which in turn revealed the ultimate direction in which all of these artists sensed society to be heading: towards a world in which sex itself has fallen under the mechanical demiurge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
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Open AccessArticle S-O-T Body Repairs: Narrative Pursuits
Received: 10 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper is a metaphorical extension of my practice of intertwining my conceptual/theoretical development with my personal history. Allowing the autobiographical narrative to become the driver of my practice has had a profound influence on my work. This has resulted in changes in [...] Read more.
This paper is a metaphorical extension of my practice of intertwining my conceptual/theoretical development with my personal history. Allowing the autobiographical narrative to become the driver of my practice has had a profound influence on my work. This has resulted in changes in the intention and scale of my work and new approaches to making, with a re-evaluation of the hierarchy of processes and materials. Written as a reflective case study, from a practice-led research perspective, the paper illustrates a realignment in creative methodology from a craft-based practitioner specialising in kiln-formed glass, to that of a mixed media sculptor. This transition was made in response to my desire to break free of my perceived confines as a craft practitioner, with a focus on technical excellence and the predominant language of glass, and place the concept at the forefront of my practice. This enabled me to explore the relationship of personal geographies of landscapes, to inform my prevailing concepts of corporeal vulnerabilities, in a more integral way. S-O-T Body Repairs was the title of a solo exhibition that sprang from this body of research and is discussed in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle An Empirical Approach to Colour in Glass
Received: 1 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper focuses on the characteristics and use of transparent homogenous coloured glass for cast glass sculpture. It provides an overview of glass colouring agents and their characteristics, and establishes factors that influence the appearance of colour in glass. Methods to visually evaluate [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the characteristics and use of transparent homogenous coloured glass for cast glass sculpture. It provides an overview of glass colouring agents and their characteristics, and establishes factors that influence the appearance of colour in glass. Methods to visually evaluate appropriate colour density for a given form are discussed, as well as essential characteristics that a form must possess to achieve results within a density threshold area, where coloured glass changes in value and/or hue between thick and thin sections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Refugees for Refugees: Musicians between Confinement and Perspectives
Received: 26 November 2018 / Revised: 3 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 16 January 2019
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Abstract
Driven by the solidarity movements following the “refugee crisis” of 2015, the Brussels-based non-profit organization Muziekpublique, specialized in the promotion of so-called “world music”, initiated the Refugees for Refugees project. This album and performance tour featured traditional musicians who had found asylum in [...] Read more.
Driven by the solidarity movements following the “refugee crisis” of 2015, the Brussels-based non-profit organization Muziekpublique, specialized in the promotion of so-called “world music”, initiated the Refugees for Refugees project. This album and performance tour featured traditional musicians who had found asylum in Belgium and had artistic, political, and social goals. In comparison to the other projects conducted by the organization, each step of the project benefited from exceptional coverage and financial support. At the same time, the association and the musicians were facing administrative, musical, and ethical problems they had never encountered before. Three years after its creation, the band Refugees for Refugees is still touring the Belgian and international scenes and is going to release a new album, following the will of all actors to go on with the project and demonstrating the important social mobilization it aroused. Through this case study, we aim at questioning the complexity of elaborating a project staging a common identity of “refugees” while valuing their diversity; understanding the reasons for the exceptional success the project has encountered; and determining to what extent and at what level it helped—or not—the musicians to rebuild their lives in Belgium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arts and Refugees: Multidisciplinary Perspectives)
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Open AccessArticle Tomás Saraceno’s Art Work “In Orbit” (2013) against the Backdrop of Space Architecture
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 23 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
When discussing the correlation between technological progress and the development of modern architecture, case studies from the fine arts can be instructive. This article undertakes a close architectural analysis of Tomás Saraceno’s walkable art installation “In Orbit” (2013) by releasing previously unpublished technical [...] Read more.
When discussing the correlation between technological progress and the development of modern architecture, case studies from the fine arts can be instructive. This article undertakes a close architectural analysis of Tomás Saraceno’s walkable art installation “In Orbit” (2013) by releasing previously unpublished technical specifications. A brief history of envisioned and constructed space architecture of the last hundred years—which can be divided into three phases—serves to locate the installation within the currents of predictive utopia, realized architecture and technological development. It becomes clear that Saraceno not only takes up pre-existing architectural techniques, but also develops them further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technological Progress as a Basis for Modern Architecture)
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Open AccessArticle Calligraphic Glass: Making Marks with Glass
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 31 December 2018 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
Calligraphic glass is one of the newer developments in contemporary glass art. The long-standing tradition of calligraphy is a rich source of inspiration for the glass artist, glass being a relatively new material for spontaneous mark-making. The investigation of the calligraphic quality of [...] Read more.
Calligraphic glass is one of the newer developments in contemporary glass art. The long-standing tradition of calligraphy is a rich source of inspiration for the glass artist, glass being a relatively new material for spontaneous mark-making. The investigation of the calligraphic quality of artworks ultimately leads to a discussion of human body movement, because mark-making is fundamentally a kinetic exercise. Often, the artist’s psychological and physical state is more important than the resultant marks. Building upon my doctoral research, which introduced the basic idea and techniques of ‘calligraphic lampworking’, this paper develops the discussion mainly regarding how the artist’s body movement may be manifested as spatial traces made from glass lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Leonora Carrington on and off Screen: Intertextual and Intermedial Connections between the Artist’s Creative Practice and the Medium of Film
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
This article explores the under-researched intertextual and intermedial connections between Leonora Carrington’s transdisciplinary practice and the medium of film. The analysis focuses on the artist’s cameo appearances in two 1960s Mexican productions—There Are No Thieves in This Village (Alberto Isaac 1964) and [...] Read more.
This article explores the under-researched intertextual and intermedial connections between Leonora Carrington’s transdisciplinary practice and the medium of film. The analysis focuses on the artist’s cameo appearances in two 1960s Mexican productions—There Are No Thieves in This Village (Alberto Isaac 1964) and A Pure Soul (Juan Ibáñez 1965)—which mark her creative collaborations with Surrealist filmmaker Luis Buñuel and Magic Realists Gabriel García Márquez and Carlos Fuentes. Carrington’s cameo roles are analyzed within a network of intertextual translations between her visual and literary works that often mix autobiographical and fictional motifs. Moreover, it is argued that Carrington’s cinematic mediations employ the recurring Surrealist tropes of anti-Catholic and anti-bourgeois satire. The article also investigates Carrington’s creative approach towards art directing and costume design, expressed in the Surrealist horror film The Mansion of Madness (Juan López Moctezuma 1973). The analysis examines the intermedial connections between Carrington’s practice of cinematic set design and her earlier experiments with theatrical scenography. Overall, this study aims to reveal undiscovered aspects of Leonora Carrington’s artistic identity and her transdisciplinary oeuvre. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section New Media)
Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Arts in 2018
Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
Rigorous peer-review is the corner-stone of high-quality academic publishing [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle Tools for Tooling: Digital Fabrication Technology as the Innovation Enabler
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 9 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper describes research concerning the creation of a novel sheet glass forming system based on the Reconfigurable Pin Tooling (RPT) principle. The paper will initially outline some of the theoretical and technical background for the research. These contexts particularly concern tools and [...] Read more.
This paper describes research concerning the creation of a novel sheet glass forming system based on the Reconfigurable Pin Tooling (RPT) principle. The paper will initially outline some of the theoretical and technical background for the research. These contexts particularly concern tools and innovation environments as well as a brief overview of the history of the RPT concept. A description of the development of the tooling systems through practice-based research is then provided followed by coverage of creative explorations with this new glass-forming method. Based on the results of the research, the author argues that digital fabrication technologies can provide the key toolsets for individual creative practitioners to successfully innovate through their own toolmaking projects. This argument is evidenced by artefacts (glass bowls) produced by the author using the RPT systems developed during the research; these glass bowls have been widely exhibited and received both critical as well as commercial acclaim. The article concludes with observations from this research and reflections on the findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Representing Rape Trauma in Film: Moving beyond the Event
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 9 January 2019
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Abstract
Trauma theorists foreground the unrepresentability of trauma; however, with modern innovations in visual representation, such as the photograph and cinema, depictions of trauma have begun to circulate across different mediums for a variety of audiences. These images tend to problematically present the traumatic [...] Read more.
Trauma theorists foreground the unrepresentability of trauma; however, with modern innovations in visual representation, such as the photograph and cinema, depictions of trauma have begun to circulate across different mediums for a variety of audiences. These images tend to problematically present the traumatic event rather than the effects of trauma, such as traumatic memory. Specifically, some contemporary Hollywood popular films and television series that include rape as their subject matter often include a rape scene that can evoke affects such as disgust or empathy, and while these affects can last the duration of the film, they fail to shift popular discourses about rape because affect is more productive when it focuses on effects instead of events. As trauma studies has shifted to memory studies in the Humanities, and rape has become more prominent in popular culture through the circulation of personal testimony on social media and memoir, depictions of rape in cinema have slowly started to change from presentations of rape scenes to representations of rape trauma that highlight different affects, such as shame. Using Monster (2003), Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011), Room (2015), and the television series, 13 Reasons Why (2017) and Sharp Objects (2018) as case studies, this paper argues that, for an audiovisual depiction of rape to shift popular discourses about rape, it would have to function rhetorically to widen the cultural understanding of rape trauma beyond the event, and demonstrate that rape trauma should be understood as part of the personal, unconscious, cultural, and visual mediation of traumatic memory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Memory, Affect, and Cinema)
Open AccessArticle Glass—A Material Practice in the Anthropocene
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper details and discusses Material Journey (2018), an art project by the author that was exhibited at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland (UK) from 9 June to 2 September 2018. This research project sought to interrogate the material impact of one [...] Read more.
This paper details and discusses Material Journey (2018), an art project by the author that was exhibited at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland (UK) from 9 June to 2 September 2018. This research project sought to interrogate the material impact of one art project made of glass by carefully considering the different stages of making—from design to production to the exhibition phase. The carbon footprint of an energy intensive material such as glass is often considered anathema to sustainable making practices in the field of applied arts. Whilst this paper makes the case that the material impact of individual art practices is negligible in the global context of carbon footprints, it nevertheless argues that the craft of ‘making’ has a critical role to play in the Anthropocene. Critically, this project is one of the first art projects in glass that critically examines the carbon footprint of a material practice. It is argued that this conversation is long overdue but makes the case that the tools for understanding and calculating the carbon footprint of a material practice are currently lacking and need more development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Don’t Be Afraid of the Digital
Received: 30 October 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 20 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
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Abstract
The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal started to receive born digital material in the late 1990s. Not knowing what to do with it, typically only the physical appearance was described. Since 2012, the CCA has seriously started to look into its [...] Read more.
The Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal started to receive born digital material in the late 1990s. Not knowing what to do with it, typically only the physical appearance was described. Since 2012, the CCA has seriously started to look into its born digital collections and actively started to acquire more. CCA was not very interested in how to overcome the technocratic question as to how to preserve and give access to born digital material, but wanted to understand how the digital technology has changed and shaped architecture. The curatorial approach and the investment in staff and expertise led to success: the CCA is now able to preserve its born digital collections, to describe it, to access nearly all files, to make it accessible for research, and to share this with the community. How? By just doing it, making mistakes, and learning by doing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Born Digital Cultural Histories)
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Open AccessBook Review Hip Hop Family Tree Treasury Editions: A Book Review for Art and Visual Culture Educators
Received: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 24 December 2018 / Published: 29 December 2018
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This book review examines Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree as compiled and packaged by Fantagraphics into two gift box sets featuring a total of four treasury editions of collected works. The basic premise of Hip Hop Family Tree focuses on a loose [...] Read more.
This book review examines Ed Piskor’s Hip Hop Family Tree as compiled and packaged by Fantagraphics into two gift box sets featuring a total of four treasury editions of collected works. The basic premise of Hip Hop Family Tree focuses on a loose narrative detailing the historical development of hip-hop culture as depicted in a comic book format. The review begins with a brief summary of each treasury edition with a specific focus on selected vignettes detailing the role that visual art has played in hip-hop culture. The review closes with a discussion of the overall relevance of Piskor’s work to those working in art and visual culture education. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Smart Experience in Fashion Design: A Speculative Analysis of Smart Material Systems Applications
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 29 November 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 29 December 2018
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Abstract
During the last decade, smart materials and systems have increasingly impacted several niches, including ‘one-off/limited edition experimental fashion’. As the traditional boundaries between what is art and what was not supposed to be art are now turning into osmotic membranes, we will speculatively [...] Read more.
During the last decade, smart materials and systems have increasingly impacted several niches, including ‘one-off/limited edition experimental fashion’. As the traditional boundaries between what is art and what was not supposed to be art are now turning into osmotic membranes, we will speculatively focus on how ‘smart material systems’ are highly contributing to outline a new creative landscape full of interesting and compelling issues. Introducing three different sub-niches of experimental fashion—multi-sensory dresses, empathic dresses, and bio-smart dresses—this article outlines the emergence of a new smart design scenario. Then, we critically discuss some of the implications of the developing research in terms of design thinking and design aesthetics. This paper aims to contribute to the topic of next design scenario, demonstrating how design research is increasingly affecting the extension of human perception, emotions, and the concept of ‘almost-living’ entities, projecting towards the redefinition of relationships with materials and objects. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Transforming Fashion Expression through Textile Thinking
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 24 December 2018
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Abstract
The focus of this research is on the experiences of a new fashion pedagogy linked to textile studios at Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, in Espoo, Finland. Rich practice-based research and skilled use of materials and textile techniques are elements [...] Read more.
The focus of this research is on the experiences of a new fashion pedagogy linked to textile studios at Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, in Espoo, Finland. Rich practice-based research and skilled use of materials and textile techniques are elements of transforming fashion design implemented through studio-based pedagogy. Effective learning is constructed by adding tacit and haptic knowledge of textiles into fashion expression. Furthermore, while textile design combines elements from aesthetic creativity with technical skills, this knowledge, textile thinking, can form a new grounding for fashion design. Through reflective learning, practically oriented and theoretical knowledge can be combined, and hands-on studio pedagogy has established the platform for this type of learning. Fashion students’ textile studies extend to woven fabrics and jacquards as well as knits, embroideries, prints, and other finishing techniques and aim to teach them about industrial manufacturing and provide them with an understanding of industrial processes and requirements. This research observes this transformation process of fashion expression through textile thinking based on observations, teachers’ reflections, and student interviews. Further, the learning outcomes have been reflected against the transformation of the curriculum to provide understanding for this development process. Full article
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Open AccessEssay The Mechanical Art of Laughter
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 19 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract
Our aesthetic experiences are today conditioned by machines, which operate at multiple levels: at the moment of conception of a work, at the moment of conservation and distribution of the work, and at the moment of its contemplation. For art today, it is [...] Read more.
Our aesthetic experiences are today conditioned by machines, which operate at multiple levels: at the moment of conception of a work, at the moment of conservation and distribution of the work, and at the moment of its contemplation. For art today, it is no longer a theoretical question of asking whether the machine can act with freedom in the sense of a game that remains as of yet open-ended—or if humans themselves can still so act in a world entirely conditioned by technology—because the brute fact is that machines are becoming ever more autonomous, and humans ever more dependent upon them. For some artists, therefore, the ideas of autonomy and sacralization are best addressed, not in the posing of serious questions, but rather through the subversive activity of enticing the machine to reveal its comic nature—and wherein we discover, with Bergson, the essentially rigid and mechanical nature of the humorous. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
Open AccessArticle Japan’s New Left and New Wave. An Ideology’s Perspective as an Alternative to That of National Cinema
Received: 17 October 2018 / Revised: 9 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
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Abstract
Starting from the perspective that national cinema is not a neutral concept, but rather a film expression with ideological implications, in this article I will argue that what should be analysed in films is not what connects them to certain nations, but with [...] Read more.
Starting from the perspective that national cinema is not a neutral concept, but rather a film expression with ideological implications, in this article I will argue that what should be analysed in films is not what connects them to certain nations, but with certain ideologies. Rather than claiming the national nature of a film, it is more accurate to identify for instance elements of a national ideology underlying the film. It can be more enriching to analyse different film trends that are based on their connections with different ideologies, thus stressing their political nature, rather than highlighting cultural or geographical features in order to determine the supposedly natural outline of national cinemas. From this point of view, I consider the Japanese New Wave cinema of the 1960s and early 1970s to be a reflection of Japan’s coetaneous New Left ideology. In order to illustrate this political reading of the Japanese New Wave, I focus on the analysis of a paradigmatic film: Eros + Massacre (Erosu purasu Gyakusatsu 1969), directed by Yoshida Kijū. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Japanese Transnational Cinema)
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