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Open AccessArticle

The Ethics of Representation in Light of Minamata Disease: Tsuchimoto Noriaki and His Minamata Documentaries

Independent Scholar, El Cerrito, CA 94530, USA
Received: 28 January 2019 / Revised: 25 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in the Japanese Documentary Mode)
In this paper, I will examine how Japanese documentary filmmaker Tsuchimoto Noriaki (1928–2008) tackled the issue of visual ethics through the representation of Matsunaga Kumiko and Kamimura Tomoko—two young female patients known for the symbolic roles they each played in the history of Minamata disease. I will introduce the ethical challenge Tsuchimoto encountered upon his first visit to Minamata in 1965—especially how he grappled with the question of filming subjects (shutai) who were unconscious and/or unable to express whether they approved the act of filming or not—and how such conundrums were reflected into his representation of Kumiko in her hospital bed. For the analysis of the representation of Tomoko as seen in Tsuchimoto’s documentary, I will bring in W. Eugene Smith’s photograph “Tomoko and Mother in the Bath” as a point of comparison to explore what could be an ethical representation of Minamata disease patients, including the issue of photographs that seem to beautify the tragedy. Based on the above examinations, I will argue that the challenges Tsuchimoto faced upon representing unresponsive subjects and the very struggle to find a way to capture them as humans, not as patients or victims, altered his manner of artistic and political involvement with Minamata disease. And in the current post-Fukushima era, the issue of ethical representation that he kept exploring carries even more significance upon representing disasters. View Full-Text
Keywords: Minamata disease; Tsuchimoto Noriaki; W. Eugene Smith; Ishimure Michiko; ethics of representation; The Children of Minamata are Living; Minamata: The Victims and Their World Minamata disease; Tsuchimoto Noriaki; W. Eugene Smith; Ishimure Michiko; ethics of representation; The Children of Minamata are Living; Minamata: The Victims and Their World
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MDPI and ACS Style

Inoue, M. The Ethics of Representation in Light of Minamata Disease: Tsuchimoto Noriaki and His Minamata Documentaries. Arts 2019, 8, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010037

AMA Style

Inoue M. The Ethics of Representation in Light of Minamata Disease: Tsuchimoto Noriaki and His Minamata Documentaries. Arts. 2019; 8(1):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010037

Chicago/Turabian Style

Inoue, Miyo. 2019. "The Ethics of Representation in Light of Minamata Disease: Tsuchimoto Noriaki and His Minamata Documentaries" Arts 8, no. 1: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010037

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