Previous Issue
Volume 10, September

Table of Contents

Societies, Volume 10, Issue 4 (December 2020) – 9 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Involuntary Full- and Part-Time Work: Employees’ Mental Health and the Role of Family- and Work-Related Resources
Societies 2020, 10(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040081 (registering DOI) - 24 Oct 2020
Abstract
Resources related to a good work-life balance may play an important role for the mental health of workers with involuntary working hours. This study investigates whether involuntary part-time (i.e., working part-time, but preferring full-time work) and involuntary full-time work (i.e., working full-time, but [...] Read more.
Resources related to a good work-life balance may play an important role for the mental health of workers with involuntary working hours. This study investigates whether involuntary part-time (i.e., working part-time, but preferring full-time work) and involuntary full-time work (i.e., working full-time, but preferring part-time work) are associated with a deterioration of mental health and whether family- and work-related resources buffer this association. Data were obtained from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) with baseline information on involuntary working hours and resources. This information was linked to changes in mental health two years later. We found impaired mental health for involuntary full-time male workers and increased mental health for regular part-time female workers. The mental health of involuntary full-time male workers is more vulnerable, compared to regular full-time workers, when having high non-standard work hours and when being a partner (with or without children). Involuntary part-time work is detrimental to men’s mental health when doing a high amount of household work. This study is one of the first to emphasize the mental health consequences of involuntary full-time work. Avoiding role and time conflicts between family and work roles are important for the mental health of men too. Full article
Open AccessConcept Paper
Beyond TTM and ABC: A Practice Perspective on Physical Activity Promotion for Adolescent Females from Disadvantaged Backgrounds
Societies 2020, 10(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040080 - 18 Oct 2020
Viewed by 257
Abstract
This paper builds on a growing body of literature on the promise of practice theory in understanding and promoting behavior change in society and develops upon Blue (2017) and Spotswood et al.’s (2019) rationale for evolving theories of practice into the domain of [...] Read more.
This paper builds on a growing body of literature on the promise of practice theory in understanding and promoting behavior change in society and develops upon Blue (2017) and Spotswood et al.’s (2019) rationale for evolving theories of practice into the domain of contemporary physical activity research. We begin by considering the intersectional nature of the problem. Statistics reveal that physical activity gradients exist based on gender, as well as socio-economic position. Women, girls, and disadvantaged populations report lower levels of activity than more affluent males and females. More problematic still is what StreetGames (2017) call the “double jeopardy”, where these characteristics intersect, intensifying the negative gradient. Our argument then comprises three parts. First, we provide a critical discussion of intervention studies seeking to transform exercise behavior amongst these populations. The issue we identify is that studies typically rely on behavior change models, such as the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) and the ABC framework. However, these models tend to take insufficient account of the practical and social aspects of behavior change in physical activity, and thus their subjects often succumb to value-action gaps (Shove, 2010). Second, in contrast, we propose that practice theory provides a promising alternative theoretical lens for promoting behavior change in disadvantaged and often resistant populations. Third, the paper highlights a range of conceptual considerations for exploring the relationship between young, disadvantaged women and physical activity, as well as the development of tangible solutions to improve participation. Full article
Open AccessConcept Paper
Dealignment: Class in Britain and Class in British Sociology Since 1945
Societies 2020, 10(4), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040079 - 15 Oct 2020
Viewed by 176
Abstract
This paper sets changes in Britain’s class structure since 1945 alongside the parallel sociological controversies about class. Since the 1970s, the class scheme developed by John Goldthorpe and colleagues for initial use in their study of social mobility in Britain has become sociology’s [...] Read more.
This paper sets changes in Britain’s class structure since 1945 alongside the parallel sociological controversies about class. Since the 1970s, the class scheme developed by John Goldthorpe and colleagues for initial use in their study of social mobility in Britain has become sociology’s standard template for thinking about and researching class. Versions have been adopted by the UK government and the European Union as their official socio-economic classifications. This paper does not dispute that the Goldthorpe scheme is still the best available for classifying by occupation, or that occupation remains our best single indicator of class, or that a constant class scheme must be used if the purpose is to measure trends over time in rates of relative inter-generational mobility. Despite these merits, it is argued that the sociological gaze has been weakened by failing to represent changes over time in the class structure itself and, therefore, how class is experienced in lay people’s lives. There has been a relative neglect of absolute social mobility flows (which have changed over time), and a pre-occupation with the inter-generational and a relative neglect of intra-career mobilities and immobilities. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Constitutive Practices of Public Smartphone Use
Societies 2020, 10(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040078 - 10 Oct 2020
Viewed by 287
Abstract
The smartphone has become the most ubiquitous piece of personal technology, giving it significant social importance and sociological relevance. In this article, we explore how the smartphone interacts with and impacts social interaction in the setting of the urban café. Through analyzing 52 [...] Read more.
The smartphone has become the most ubiquitous piece of personal technology, giving it significant social importance and sociological relevance. In this article, we explore how the smartphone interacts with and impacts social interaction in the setting of the urban café. Through analyzing 52 spontaneous in-depth interviews related to social interaction in cafés, we identify three categories of smartphone use in social settings: interaction suspension, deliberately shielding interaction, and accessing shareables. These categories comprise the constitutive smartphone practices that define the social order of public smartphone use within an interactionist sociological framework. Full article
Open AccessConcept Paper
The COVID-19 Contagion–Pandemic Dyad: A View from Social Sciences
Societies 2020, 10(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040077 - 06 Oct 2020
Viewed by 406
Abstract
The objective of this concept paper focuses on the relevance of the analytical potential of Social Sciences for understanding the multiple implications and challenges posed by the COVID-19 contagion–pandemic dyad. This pandemic is generating a global threat with a high number of deaths [...] Read more.
The objective of this concept paper focuses on the relevance of the analytical potential of Social Sciences for understanding the multiple implications and challenges posed by the COVID-19 contagion–pandemic dyad. This pandemic is generating a global threat with a high number of deaths and infected individuals, triggering enormous pressure on health systems. Most countries have put in place a set of procedures based on social distancing, as well as (preventive) isolation from possible infected and transmitters of the disease. This crisis has profound implications and raises issues for which the contribution of Social Sciences does not seem to be sufficiently mobilised. The contribution of Social Sciences is paramount, in terms of their knowledge and skills, to the knowledge of these problematic realities and to act in an informed way on these crises. Social Sciences are a scientific project focused on interdisciplinarity, theoretical and methodological plurality. This discussion is developed from the systems of relationships between social phenomena in the coordinates of time and place, and in the socio-historical contexts in which they are integrated. A pandemic is a complex phenomenon as it is always a point of articulation between natural and social determinations. The space of the discourse on the COVID-19 pandemic can be understood as the expression of a coalition of discourses, i.e., the interaction of various discourses, combined in re-interpretative modalities of certain realities and social phenomena. The circumstantial coalitions of interests, which shape the different discursive records and actions produced by different agents of distinct social spaces, enable the acknowledgement and legitimation of this pandemic threat and danger, and the promotion of its public management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 and Social Sciences)
Open AccessReview
Mitigating Visual Ageism in Digital Media: Designing for Dynamic Diversity to Enhance Communication Rights for Senior Citizens
Societies 2020, 10(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040076 - 01 Oct 2020
Viewed by 316
Abstract
This paper advocates for the importance of visual communication rights for older people to avoid “visual ageism,” described as media practices of visually underrepresenting older people or misrepresenting them in a prejudiced way. It aims to present a set of policy recommendations using [...] Read more.
This paper advocates for the importance of visual communication rights for older people to avoid “visual ageism,” described as media practices of visually underrepresenting older people or misrepresenting them in a prejudiced way. It aims to present a set of policy recommendations using “designing for dynamic diversity” as the leading principle. By discussing studies about the ways older people are visual represented in digital media content, the paper shows how visual communication rights for older people could help to fight “visual ageism.” It also pleads for collaborative ways to create digital visual content “together with” older people and not “for” them. Moreover, the paper makes a plea for empowering senior citizens by advocating their right of having a voice about the manner in which they are visually represented and enhancing their power to influence specifically the images representing them. Full article
Open AccessConcept Paper
A Reflexive GOAL Framework for Achieving Student-Centered Learning in European Higher Education: From Class Learning to Community Engagement
Societies 2020, 10(4), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040075 - 26 Sep 2020
Viewed by 436
Abstract
Student-centered learning (SCL) has been acknowledged and supported by research as very important for helping students develop life-long independent learning and transferable skills. Yet the implementation of SCL in European higher education has been patchy where experts in the field call for the [...] Read more.
Student-centered learning (SCL) has been acknowledged and supported by research as very important for helping students develop life-long independent learning and transferable skills. Yet the implementation of SCL in European higher education has been patchy where experts in the field call for the need for a framework that could guide higher education institutions (HEIs) in designing and implementing SCL. This paper aims to fill in this identified gap by reflecting on the basic literature and social theory to propose the reflexive GOAL (Goals (vision and objectives), Organization (structures), Actions (immersion into structures and actions), and Learning a culture (instilled through reflexivity)) framework for the implementation of SCL in higher education in its broader sense to encompass elements from in-class learning to extra-curricular and community engagement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Social Utility and Desirability of E-learning)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: A Comparison of Four European Countries with Regards to Assistive Technologies
Societies 2020, 10(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040074 - 25 Sep 2020
Viewed by 238
Abstract
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is an international treaty that aims to promote, protect and ensure the rights of persons with disabilities so that they can fully participate in society and enjoy the same freedoms and [...] Read more.
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is an international treaty that aims to promote, protect and ensure the rights of persons with disabilities so that they can fully participate in society and enjoy the same freedoms and opportunities as others. It provides an important framework for the inclusion of persons with disabilities with the help of Assistive Technologies (AT). This paper assesses and compares the implementation of the CRPD with regards to the availability of AT in four countries (Germany, Hungary, Portugal and Sweden), which to some extent represent different European regions. The paper is based on a review of relevant academic literature, the DOTCOM database and regulatory documents as well as on five validation interviews with national experts. In the countries studied, anti-discriminatory and other legislation is included at the highest level of the legal framework and contains detailed rules on definitions, remedies and legal procedures. There are specific prohibitions in several fields, such as employment, housing, and healthcare. Nonetheless, there are still cases of non-compliance with the CRPD and of laws and regulations which discriminate against persons with a disability. Additionally, there are great variations between countries. As very positive examples of favourable regulatory frameworks for furthering inclusion with the help of ATs do exist, there may be benefit in raising awareness of such examples to support other countries in developing their own measures. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Impact of Medical Brain Drain on Child Health in 188 Countries over 2000–2015
Societies 2020, 10(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10040073 - 24 Sep 2020
Viewed by 334
Abstract
Medical brain drain has been a policy concern in recent years when many countries are struggling with health workforce shortages. Some suggest that wealthy countries only exacerbate this problem by recruiting internationally trained health professionals. Little research has considered the impact of medical [...] Read more.
Medical brain drain has been a policy concern in recent years when many countries are struggling with health workforce shortages. Some suggest that wealthy countries only exacerbate this problem by recruiting internationally trained health professionals. Little research has considered the impact of medical brain drain on child health in the sending society, and the few empirical analyses that exist find no conclusive evidence. To fill this gap, I test the underlying mechanisms through which medical brain drain may affect child health in scores of countries. I use a panel dataset covering 188 countries over the period 2000–2015. The findings from fixed-effects regression models suggest that medical brain drain negatively affects child health and that there is a curvilinear relationship between the two. The effects on child health are stronger in countries approximately in the middle of the medical brain drain scale, and weaker on both ends. The implications of the findings for policy and future research are highlighted. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Back to TopTop